• We compare analytical computations with numerical simulations for dark-matter clustering, in general relativity and in the normal branch of DGP gravity (nDGP). Our analytical frameword is the Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure (EFTofLSS), which we use to compute the one-loop dark-matter power spectrum, including the resummation of infrared bulk displacement effects. We compare this to a set of 20 COLA simulations at redshifts $z = 0$, $z=0.5$, and $z =1$, and fit the free parameter of the EFTofLSS, called the speed of sound, in both $\Lambda$CDM and nDGP at each redshift. At one-loop at $z = 0$, the reach of the EFTofLSS is $k_{\rm reach}\approx 0.14 \, h { \rm Mpc^{-1}}$ for both $\Lambda$CDM and nDGP. Along the way, we compare two different infrared resummation schemes and two different treatments of the time dependence of the perturbative expansion, concluding that they agree to approximately $1\%$ over the scales of interest. Finally, we use the ratio of the COLA power spectra to make a precision measurement of the difference between the speeds of sound in $\Lambda$CDM and nDGP, and verify that this is proportional to the modification of the linear coupling constant of the Poisson equation.
  • The effect of massive neutrinos on the growth of cold dark matter perturbations acts as a scale-dependent Newton's constant and leads to scale-dependent growth factors just as we often find in models of gravity beyond General Relativity. We show how to compute growth factors for $\Lambda$CDM and general modified gravity cosmologies combined with massive neutrinos in Lagrangian perturbation theory for use in COLA and extensions thereof. We implement this together with the grid-based massive neutrino method of Brandbyge and Hannestad in $\texttt{MG-PICOLA}$ and compare COLA simulations to full $\it N$-body simulations of $\Lambda$CDM and $f(R)$ gravity with massive neutrinos. Our implementation is computationally cheap if the underlying cosmology already has scale-dependent growth factors and it is shown to be able to produce results that match $\it N$-body to percent level accuracy for both the total and CDM matter power-spectra up to $k\lesssim 1 h/$Mpc.
  • We present a general parallelized and easy-to-use code to perform numerical simulations of structure formation using the COLA (COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration) method for cosmological models that exhibit scale-dependent growth at the level of first and second order Lagrangian perturbation theory. For modified gravity theories we also include screening using a fast approximate method that covers all the main examples of screening mechanisms in the literature. We test the code by comparing it to full simulations of two popular modified gravity models, namely $f(R)$ gravity and nDGP, and find good agreement in the modified gravity boost-factors relative to $\Lambda$CDM even when using a fairly small number of COLA time steps.
  • We elucidate the importance of the consistent treatment of gravity-model specific non-linearities when estimating the growth of cosmological structures from redshift space distortions (RSD). Within the context of standard perturbation theory (SPT), we compare the predictions of two theoretical templates with redshift space data from COLA (COmoving Lagrangian Acceleration) simulations in the normal branch of DGP gravity (nDGP) and General Relativity (GR). Using COLA for these comparisons is validated using a suite of full N-body simulations for the same theories. The two theoretical templates correspond to the standard general relativistic perturbation equations and those same equations modelled within nDGP. Gravitational clustering non-linear effects are accounted for by modelling the power spectrum up to one loop order and redshift space clustering anisotropy is modelled using the Taruya, Nishimichi and Saito (TNS) RSD model. Using this approach, we attempt to recover the simulation's fiducial logarithmic growth parameter $f$. By assigning the simulation data with errors representing an idealised survey with a volume of $10\mbox{Gpc}^3/h^3$, we find the GR template is unable to recover fiducial $f$ to within 1$\sigma$ at $z=1$ when we match the data up to $k_{\rm max}=0.195h$/Mpc. On the other hand, the DGP template recovers the fiducial value within $1\sigma$. Further, we conduct the same analysis for sets of mock data generated for generalised models of modified gravity using SPT, where again we analyse the GR template's ability to recover the fiducial value. We find that for models with enhanced gravitational non-linearity, the theoretical bias of the GR template becomes significant for stage IV surveys. Thus, we show that for the future large data volume galaxy surveys, the self-consistent modelling of non-GR gravity scenarios will be crucial in constraining theory parameters.
  • An important indicator of modified gravity is the effect of the local environment on halo properties. This paper examines the influence of the local tidal structure on the halo mass function, the halo orientation, spin and the concentration-mass relation. We generalise the excursion set formalism to produce a halo mass function conditional on large-scale structure. Our model agrees well with simulations on large scales at which the density field is linear or weakly non-linear. Beyond this, our principal result is that $f(R)$ does affect halo abundances, the halo spin parameter and the concentration-mass relationship in an environment-independent way, whereas we find no appreciable deviation from $\Lambda$CDM for the mass function with fixed environment density, nor the alignment of the orientation and spin vectors of the halo to the eigenvectors of the local cosmic web. There is a general trend for greater deviation from $\Lambda$CDM in underdense environments and for high-mass haloes, as expected from chameleon screening.
  • We use cosmological hydrodynamical simulations to study the effect of screened modified gravity models on the mass estimates of galaxy clusters. In particular, we focus on two novel aspects: (i) we study modified gravity models in which baryons and dark matter are coupled with different strengths to the scalar field, and, (ii) we put the simulation results into the greater context of a general screened-modified gravity parametrization. We have compared the mass of clusters inferred via lensing versus the mass inferred via kinematical measurements as a probe of violations of the equivalence principle at Mpc scales. We find that estimates of cluster masses via X-ray observations is mainly sensitive to the coupling between the scalar degree of freedom and baryons - while the kinematical mass is mainly sensitive to the coupling to dark matter. Therefore, the relation between the two mass estimates is a probe of a possible non-universal coupling between the scalar field, the standard model fields, and dark matter. Finally, we used observational data of kinetic, thermal and lensing masses to place constraints on deviations from general relativity on cluster scales for a general parametrization of screened modified gravity theories which contains $f(R)$ and Symmetron models. We find that while the kinematic mass can be used to place competitive constraints, using thermal measurements is challenging as a potential non-thermal contribution is degenerate with the imprint of modified gravity.
  • Despite its continued observational successes, there is a persistent (and growing) interest in extending cosmology beyond the standard model, $\Lambda$CDM. This is motivated by a range of apparently serious theoretical issues, involving such questions as the cosmological constant problem, the particle nature of dark matter, the validity of general relativity on large scales, the existence of anomalies in the CMB and on small scales, and the predictivity and testability of the inflationary paradigm. In this paper, we summarize the current status of $\Lambda$CDM as a physical theory, and review investigations into possible alternatives along a number of different lines, with a particular focus on highlighting the most promising directions. While the fundamental problems are proving reluctant to yield, the study of alternative cosmologies has led to considerable progress, with much more to come if hopes about forthcoming high-precision observations and new theoretical ideas are fulfilled.
  • We have investigated structure formation in the $\gamma$ gravity $f(R)$ model with {\it N}-body simulations. The $\gamma$ gravity model is a proposal which, unlike other viable $f(R)$ models, not only changes the gravitational dynamics, but can in principle also have signatures at the background level that are different from those obtained in $\Lambda$CDM (Cosmological constant, Cold Dark Matter). The aim of this paper is to study the nonlinear regime of the model in the case where, at late times, the background differs from $\Lambda$CDM. We quantify the signatures produced on the power spectrum, the halo mass function, and the density and velocity profiles. To appreciate the features of the model, we have compared it to $\Lambda$CDM and the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$ models. For the considered set of parameters we find that the screening mechanism is ineffective, which gives rise to deviations in the halo mass function that disagree with observations. This does not rule out the model per se, but requires choices of parameters such that $|f_{R0}|$ is much smaller, which would imply that its cosmic expansion history cannot be distinguished from $\Lambda$CDM at the background level.
  • One century after its formulation, Einstein's general relativity has made remarkable predictions and turned out to be compatible with all experimental tests. Most of these tests probe the theory in the weak-field regime, and there are theoretical and experimental reasons to believe that general relativity should be modified when gravitational fields are strong and spacetime curvature is large. The best astrophysical laboratories to probe strong-field gravity are black holes and neutron stars, whether isolated or in binary systems. We review the motivations to consider extensions of general relativity. We present a (necessarily incomplete) catalog of modified theories of gravity for which strong-field predictions have been computed and contrasted to Einstein's theory, and we summarize our current understanding of the structure and dynamics of compact objects in these theories. We discuss current bounds on modified gravity from binary pulsar and cosmological observations, and we highlight the potential of future gravitational wave measurements to inform us on the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime.
  • A number of alternatives to general relativity exhibit gravitational screening in the non-linear regime of structure formation. We describe a set of algorithms that can produce weak lensing maps of large scale structure in such theories and can be used to generate mock surveys for cosmological analysis. By analysing a few basic statistics we indicate how these alternatives can be distinguished from general relativity with future weak lensing surveys.
  • Modified gravity models require a screening mechanism to be able to evade the stringent constraints from local gravity experiments and, at the same time, give rise to observable astrophysical and cosmological signatures. Such screened modified gravity models necessarily have dynamics determined by complex nonlinear equations that usually need to be solved on a model-by-model basis to produce predictions. This makes testing them a cumbersome process. In this paper, we investigate whether there is a common signature for all the different models that is suitable to testing them on cluster scales. To do this we propose an observable related to the fifth force, which can be observationally related to the ratio of dynamical-to-lensing mass of a halo, and then show that the predictions for this observable can be rescaled to a near universal form for a large class of modified gravity models. We demonstrate this using the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$, the Symmetron, the nDGP, and the Dilaton models, as well as unifying parametrizations. The universal form is determined by only three quantities: a strength, a mass, and a width parameter. We also show how these parameters can be derived from a specific theory. This self-similarity in the predictions can hopefully be used to search for signatures of modified gravity on cluster scales in a model-independent way.
  • Self-consistent ${\it N}$-body simulations of modified gravity models are a key ingredient to obtain rigorous constraints on deviations from General Relativity using large-scale structure observations. This paper provides the first detailed comparison of the results of different ${\it N}$-body codes for the $f(R)$, DGP, and Symmetron models, starting from the same initial conditions. We find that the fractional deviation of the matter power spectrum from $\Lambda$CDM agrees to better than $1\%$ up to $k \sim 5-10~h/{\rm Mpc}$ between the different codes. These codes are thus able to meet the stringent accuracy requirements of upcoming observational surveys. All codes are also in good agreement in their results for the velocity divergence power spectrum, halo abundances and halo profiles. We also test the quasi-static limit, which is employed in most modified gravity ${\it N}$-body codes, for the Symmetron model for which the most significant non-static effects among the models considered are expected. We conclude that this limit is a very good approximation for all of the observables considered here.
  • We propose a simple and computationally fast method for performing N-body simulations for a large class of modified gravity theories with a screening mechanism such as chameleons, symmetrons and galileons. By combining the linear Klein-Gordon equation with a screening factor, calculated from analytical solutions of spherical symmetric configurations, we obtain a modified field equation whose solution is exact in the linear regime while at the same time takes screening into account on non-linear scales. The resulting modified field equation remains linear and can be solved just as quickly as the Poisson equation without any of the convergence problems that can arise when solving the full equation. We test our method with N-body simulations and find that it compares remarkably well with full simulations well into the non-linear regime.
  • Theories of modified gravity, in both the linear and fully non-linear regime, are often studied under the assumption that the evolution of the new (often scalar) degree of freedom present in the theory is quasi-static. This approximation significantly simplifies the study of the theory, and one often has good reason to believe that it should hold. Nevertheless it is a crucial assumption that should be explicitly checked whenever possible. In this paper we do so for the Vainshtein mechanism. By solving for the full spatial and time evolution of the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati and the Cubic Galileon model, in a spherical symmetric spacetime, we are able to demonstrate that the Vainshtein solution is a stable attractor and forms no matter what initial conditions we take for the scalar field. Furthermore,the quasi-static approximation is also found to be a very good approximation whenever it exists. For the best-fit Cubic Galileon model, however, we find that for deep voids at late times, the numerical solution blows up at the same time as the quasi-static solution ceases to exist. We argue that this phenomenon is a true instability of the model.
  • In this paper we present the first results from implementing two scalar-tensor modified gravity theories, the symmetron and the Hu-Sawicki $f(R)$-gravity model, into a hydrodynamic N-body code with dark matter particles and a baryonic ideal gas. The study is a continuation of previous work where the symmetron and $f(R)$ have been successfully implemented in the RAMSES code, but for dark matter only. By running simulations, we show that the deviation from $\Lambda$CDM in these models for the gas density profiles are significantly lower than the dark matter equivalents. When it comes to the matter power-spectrum we find that hydrodynamic simulations agree very well with dark matter only simulations as long as we consider scales larger than $k\sim 0.5$ h/Mpc. In general the effects of modified gravity on the baryonic gas is found to not always mirror the effects it has on the dark matter. The largest signature is found when considering temperature profiles. We find that the gas temperatures in the modified gravity model studied here show deviations, when compared to $\Lambda$CDM, that can be a factor of a few larger than the deviations found in density profiles and power spectra.
  • Screened modified gravity predicts potentially large signatures in the peculiar velocity field that makes it an interesting probe to test gravity on cosmological scales. We investigate the signatures induced by the Symmetron and a Chameleon $f(R)$ model in the peculiar velocity field using $N$-body simulations. By studying fifth force and halo velocity profiles we identify three general categories of effects found in screened modified gravity models: a fully screened regime where we recover $\Lambda$CDM to high precision, an unscreened regime where the fifth force is in full operation, and, a partially screened regime where screening occurs in the inner part of a halo, but the fifth force is active at larger radii. These three regimes can be pointed out very clearly by analyzing the deviation in the maximum cluster velocity. Observationally, the partially screened regime is of particular interest since an uniform increase of the gravitational force - as present in the unscreened regime - is degenerate with the (dynamical) halo mass estimate, and, thus, hard to detect.
  • Several extensions of the standard cosmological model include scalar fields as new degrees of freedom in the underlying gravitational theory. A particular class of these scalar field theories include screening mechanisms intended to hide the scalar field below observational limits in the solar system, but not on galactic scales, where data still gives freedom to find possible signatures of their presence. In order to make predictions to compare with observations coming from galactic and clusters scales (i.e. in the non-linear regime of cosmological evolution), cosmological N-body simulations are needed, for which codes that can solve for the scalar field must be developed. We present a new implementation of scalar-tensor theories of gravity which include screening mechanisms. The code is based in the already existing code RAMSES, to which we have added a non-linear multigrid solver that can treat a large class of scalar tensor theories of modified gravity. We present details of the implementation and the tests that we made to it. As application of the new code, we have studied the influence that two particular modified gravity theories, the symmetron and $f(R)$ gravity, have on the shape of cluster sized dark matter halos and found consistent results with previous estimations made with a static analysis.
  • We investigate the variation of the fine-structure constant, {\alpha}, in symmetron models using N-body simulations in which the full spatial distribution of {\alpha} at different redshifts has been calculated. In particular, we obtain simulated sky maps for this variation, and determine its power spectrum. We find that in high-density regions of space (such as deep inside dark matter halos) the value of {\alpha} approaches the value measured on Earth. In the low-density outskirts of halos the scalar field value can approach the symmetry breaking value and leads to significantly different values of {\alpha}. If the scalar-photon coupling strength {\beta}{\gamma} is of order unity we find that the variation of {\alpha} inside dark matter halos can be of the same magnitude as the recent claims by Webb et al. of a dipole variation. Importantly, our results also show that with low-redshift symmetry breaking these models exhibit some dependence of {\alpha} on lookback time (as opposed to a pure spatial dipole) which could in principle be detected by sufficiently accurate spectroscopic measurements, such as those of ALMA and the ELT-HIRES.
  • The Layzer-Irvine equation describes energy conservation for a pressure less fluid interacting though quasi-Newtonian gravity in an expanding Universe. We here derive a Layzer-Irvine equation for scalar field theories where the scalar field is coupled to the matter fields, and show applications of this equation by applying it to N-body simulations of modified gravity theories. There it can be used as both a dynamical test of the accuracy of the solution and the numerical implementation when solving the equation of motion. We also present an equation that can be used as a new static test for an arbitrary matter distribution. This allows us to test the N- body scalar field solver using a matter distribution which resembles what we actually encounter in numerical simulations.
  • In this work we systematically study the linear and nonlinear structure formation in chameleon theories of modified gravity, using a generic parameterisation which describes a large class of models using only 4 parameters. For this we have modified the N-body simulation code ECOSMOG to perform a total of 65 simulations for different models and parameter values, including the default LCDM. These simulations enable us to explore a significant portion of the parameter space. We have studied the effects of modified gravity on the matter power spectrum and mass function, and found a rich and interesting phenomenology where the difference with the LCDM paradigm cannot be reproduced by a linear analysis even on scales as large as k~0.05h/Mpc, since the latter incorrectly assumes that the modification of gravity depends only on the background matter density. Our results show that the chameleon screening mechanism is significantly more efficient than other mechanisms such as the dilaton and symmetron, especially in high-density regions and at early times, and can serve as a guidance to determine the parts of the chameleon parameter space which are cosmologically interesting and thus merit further studies in the future.
  • We study the linear and nonlinear structure formation in the dilaton and symmetron models of modified gravity using a generic parameterisation which describes a large class of scenarios using only a few parameters, such as the coupling between the scalar field and the matter, and the range of the scalar force on very large scales. For this we have modified the N-body simulation code ECOSMOG, which is a variant of RAMSES working in modified gravity scenarios, to perform a set of 110 simulations for different models and parameter values, including the default LCDM. These simulations enable us to explore a large portion of the parameter space. We have studied the effects of modified gravity on the matter power spectrum and mass function, and found a rich and interesting phenomenology where the difference with the LCDM template cannot be reproduced by a linear analysis even on scales as large as k~0.05 h/Mpc. Our results show the full effect of screening on nonlinear structure formation and the associated deviation from LCDM. We also investigate how differences in the force mediated by the scalar field in modified gravity models lead to qualitatively different features for the nonlinear power spectrum and the halo mass function, and how varying the individual model parameters changes these observables. The differences are particularly large in the nonlinear power spectra whose shapes for f(R), dilaton and symmetron models vary greatly, and where the characteristic bump around 1 h/Mpc of f(R) models is preserved for symmetrons, whereas an increase on much smaller scales is particular to symmetrons. No bump is present for dilatons where a flattening of the power spectrum takes place on small scales. These deviations from LCDM and the differences between modified gravity models, such as dilatons and symmetrons, could be tested with future surveys.
  • We consider modified gravity models driven by a scalar field whose effects are screened in high density regions due to the presence of non-linearities in its interaction potential and/or its coupling to matter. Our approach covers chameleon, f(R) gravity, dilaton and symmetron models and allows a unified description of all these theories. We find that the dynamics of modified gravity are entirely captured by the time variation of the scalar field mass and its coupling to matter evaluated at the cosmological minimum of its effective potential, where the scalar field sits since an epoch prior to Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. This new parameterisation of modified gravity allows one to reconstruct the potential and coupling to matter and therefore to analyse the full dynamics of the models, from the scale dependent growth of structures at the linear level to non-linear effects requiring N-body simulations. This procedure is illustrated with explicit examples of reconstruction for chameleon, dilaton, f(R) and symmetron models.
  • Recently, a supersymmetric model of dark energy coupled to cold dark matter, the supersymmetron, has been proposed. In the absence of cold dark matter, the supersymmetron field converges to a supersymmetric minimum with a vanishing cosmological constant. When cold dark matter is present, the supersymmetron evolves to a matter dependent minimum where its energy density does not vanish and could lead to the present acceleration of the Universe. The supersymmetron generates a short ranged fifth force which evades gravitational tests. It could lead to observable signatures on structure formation due to a very strong coupling to dark matter. We investigate the cosmological evolution of the field, focusing on the linear perturbations and the spherical collapse and find that observable modifications in structure formation can indeed exist. Unfortunately, we find that when the growth-rate of perturbations is in agreement with observations, an additional cosmological constant is required to account for dark energy. In this case, effects on large scale structures are still present at the non-linear level which are investigated using the spherical collapse approach.
  • We investigate the environment dependence of dark matter halos in the symmetron modified gravity scenario. The symmetron is one of three known mechanisms for screening a fifth-force and thereby recovering General Relativity in dense environments. The effectiveness of the screening depends on both the mass of the object and the environment it lies in. Using high-resolution N-body simulations we find a significant difference, which depends on the halos mass and environment, between the lensing and dynamical masses of dark matter halos similar to the f(R) modified gravity. The symmetron can however yield stronger signatures due to a freedom in the strength of the coupling to matter.
  • Scalar fields, strongly coupled to matter, can be present in nature and still be invisible to local experiments if they are subject to a screening mechanism. The symmetron is one such mechanism which relies on restoration of a spontaneously broken symmetry in regions of high density to shield the scalar fifth force. We have investigated structure formation in the symmetron model by using N-body simulations and find strong observable signatures in both the linear and nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the halo mass function. The mechanism for suppressing the scalar fifth force in high density regions is also found to work very well.