• With advancements in sensor technology, a heterogeneous set of data, containing samples of scalar, waveform signal, image, or even structured point cloud are becoming increasingly popular. Developing a statistical model, representing the behavior of the underlying system based upon such a heterogeneous set of data can be used in monitoring, control, and optimization of the system. Unfortunately, available methods only focus on the scalar and curve data and do not provide a general framework that can integrate different sources of data to construct a model. This paper poses the problem of estimating a process output, measured by a scalar, curve, an image, or a point cloud by a set of heterogeneous process variables such as scalar process setting, sensor readings, and images. We introduce a general approach in which each set of input data (predictor) as well as the output measurements are represented by tensors. We formulate a linear regression model between the input and output tensors and estimate the parameters by minimizing a least square loss function. In order to avoid overfitting and to reduce the number of parameters to be estimated, we decompose the model parameters using several bases, spanning the input and output spaces. Next, we learn both the bases and their spanning coefficients when minimizing the loss function using an alternating least square (ALS) algorithm. We show that such a minimization has a closed-form solution in each iteration and can be computed very efficiently. Through several simulation and case studies, we evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results reveal the advantage of the proposed method over some benchmarks in the literature in terms of the mean square prediction error.
  • Multivariate functional data from a complex system are naturally high-dimensional and have complex cross-correlation structure. The complexity of data structure can be observed as that (1) some functions are strongly correlated with similar features, while some others may have almost no cross-correlations with quite diverse features; and (2) the cross-correlation structure may also change over time due to the system evolution. With this regard, this paper presents a dynamic subspace learning method for multivariate functional data modeling. In particular, we consider different functions come from different subspaces, and only functions of the same subspace have cross-correlations with each other. The subspaces can be automatically formulated and learned by reformatting the problem as a sparse regression. By allowing but regularizing the regression change over time, we can describe the cross-correlation dynamics. The model can be efficiently estimated by the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA), and the features of every subspace can be extracted using the smooth multi-channel functional PCA. Numerical studies together with case studies demonstrate the efficiency and applicability of the proposed methodology.
  • A quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulator is a novel two-dimensional quantum state of matter that features quantized Hall conductance in the absence of magnetic field, resulting from topologically protected dissipationless edge states that bridge the energy gap opened by band inversion and strong spin-orbit coupling. By investigating electronic structure of epitaxially grown monolayer 1T'-WTe2 using angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and first principle calculations, we observe clear signatures of the topological band inversion and the band gap opening, which are the hallmarks of a QSH state. Scanning tunneling microscopy measurements further confirm the correct crystal structure and the existence of a bulk band gap, and provide evidence for a modified electronic structure near the edge that is consistent with the expectations for a QSH insulator. Our results establish monolayer 1T'-WTe2 as a new class of QSH insulator with large band gap in a robust two-dimensional materials family of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs).
  • We present a novel method for estimation of the fiber orientation distribution (FOD) function based on diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (D-MRI) data. We formulate the problem of FOD estimation as a regression problem through spherical deconvolution and a sparse representation of the FOD by a spherical needlets basis that form a multi-resolution tight frame for spherical functions. This sparse representation allows us to estimate FOD by an $l_1$-penalized regression under a non-negativity constraint. The resulting convex optimization problem is solved by an alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM) algorithm. The proposed method leads to a reconstruction of the FODs that is accurate, has low variability and preserves sharp features. Through extensive experiments, we demonstrate the effectiveness and favorable performance of the proposed method compared with two existing methods. Particularly, we show the ability of the proposed method in successfully resolving fiber crossing at small angles and in automatically identifying isotropic diffusion. We also apply the proposed method to real 3T D-MRI data sets of healthy elderly individuals. The results show realistic descriptions of crossing fibers that are more accurate and less noisy than competing methods even with a relatively small number of gradient directions.
  • The high temperature superconductivity in single-unit-cell (1UC) FeSe on SrTiO3 (STO)(001) and the observation of replica bands by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) have led to the conjecture that the coupling between FeSe electron and the STO phonon is responsible for the enhancement of Tc over other FeSe-based superconductors1,2. However the recent observation of a similar superconducting gap in FeSe grown on the (110) surface of STO raises the question of whether a similar mechanism applies3,4. Here we report the ARPES study of the electronic structure of FeSe grown on STO(110). Similar to the results in FeSe/STO(001), clear replica bands are observed. We also present a comparative study of STO (001) and STO(110) bare surfaces, where photo doping generates metallic surface states. Similar replica bands separating from the main band by approximately the same energy are observed, indicating this coupling is a generic feature of the STO surfaces and interfaces. Our findings suggest that the large superconducting gaps observed in FeSe films grown on two different STO surface terminations are likely enhanced by a common coupling between FeSe electrons and STO phonons.
  • Latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) is a popular topic modeling technique in academia but less so in industry, especially in large-scale applications involving search engine and online advertising systems. A main underlying reason is that the topic models used have been too small in scale to be useful; for example, some of the largest LDA models reported in literature have up to $10^3$ topics, which cover difficultly the long-tail semantic word sets. In this paper, we show that the number of topics is a key factor that can significantly boost the utility of topic-modeling systems. In particular, we show that a "big" LDA model with at least $10^5$ topics inferred from $10^9$ search queries can achieve a significant improvement on industrial search engine and online advertising systems, both of which serving hundreds of millions of users. We develop a novel distributed system called Peacock to learn big LDA models from big data. The main features of Peacock include hierarchical distributed architecture, real-time prediction and topic de-duplication. We empirically demonstrate that the Peacock system is capable of providing significant benefits via highly scalable LDA topic models for several industrial applications.
  • In this paper, an improved scatter correction with moving beam stop array (BSA) for x-ray cone beam (CB) CT is proposed. Firstly, correlation between neighboring CB views is deduced based on John's Equation. Then, correlation-based algorithm is presented to complement the incomplete views by using the redundancy (over-determined information) in CB projections. Finally, combining the algorithm with scatter correction method using moving BSA, where part of primary radiation is blocked and incomplete projections are acquired, an improved correction method is proposed. Effectiveness and robustness is validated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation with EGSnrc on humanoid phantom.
  • In the scatter correction for x-ray Cone Beam (CB) CT, the single-scan scheme with moving Beam Stop Array (BSA) offers reliable scatter measurement with low dose, and by using Projection Correlation based View Interpolation (PC-VI), the primary fluence shaded by the moving BSA (during scatter measurement) could be recovered with high accuracy. However, the moving BSA may increase the mechanical burden in real applications. For better practicability, in this paper we proposed a PC-VI based single-scan scheme with a ring-shaped stationary BSA, which serves as a virtual moving BSA during CB scan, so the shaded primary fluence by this stationary BSA can be also well recovered by PC-VI. The principle in designing the whole system is deduced and evaluated. The proposed scheme greatly enhances the practicability of the single-scan scatter correction scheme.
  • Yeast cells produce daughter cells through a DNA replication and mitosis cycle associated with checkpoints and governed by the cell cycle regulatory network. To ensure genome stability and genetic information inheritance, this regulatory network must be dynamically robust against various fluctuations. Here we construct a simplified cell cycle model for a budding yeast to investigate the underlying mechanism that ensures robustness in this process containing sequential tasks (DNA replication and mitosis). We first establish a three-variable model and select a parameter set that qualitatively describes the yeast cell cycle process. Then, through nonlinear dynamic analysis, we demonstrate that the yeast cell cycle process is an excitable system driven by a sequence of saddle-node bifurcations with ghost effects. We further show that the yeast cell cycle trajectory is globally attractive with modularity in both state and parameter space, while the convergent manifold provides a suitable control state for cell cycle checkpoints. These results not only highlight a regulatory mechanism for executing successive cell cycle processes, but also provide a possible strategy for the synthetic network design of sequential-task processes.
  • In this paper, we present a new method to generate an instantaneous volumetric image using a single x-ray projection. To fully extract motion information hidden in projection images, we partitioned a projection image into small patches. We utilized a sparse learning method to automatically select patches that have a high correlation with principal component analysis (PCA) coefficients of a lung motion model. A model that maps the patch intensity to the PCA coefficients is built along with the patch selection process. Based on this model, a measured projection can be used to predict the PCA coefficients, which are further used to generate a motion vector field and hence a volumetric image. We have also proposed an intensity baseline correction method based on the partitioned projection, where the first and the second moments of pixel intensities at a patch in a simulated image are matched with those in a measured image via a linear transformation. The proposed method has been valid in simulated data and real phantom data. The algorithm is able to identify patches that contain relevant motion information, e.g. diaphragm region. It is found that intensity correction step is important to remove the systematic error in the motion prediction. For the simulation case, the sparse learning model reduced prediction error for the first PCA coefficient to 5%, compared to the 10% error when sparse learning is not used. 95th percentile error for the predicted motion vector is reduced from 2.40 mm to 0.92mm. In the phantom case, the predicted tumor motion trajectory is successfully reconstructed with 0.82 mm mean vector field error compared to 1.66 mm error without using the sparse learning method. The algorithm robustness with respect to sparse level, patch size, and existence of diaphragm, as well as computation time, has also been studied.
  • Quantum systems in confined geometries are host to novel physical phenomena. Examples include quantum Hall systems in semiconductors and Dirac electrons in graphene. Interest in such systems has also been intensified by the recent discovery of a large enhancement in photoluminescence quantum efficiency and a potential route to valleytronics in atomically thin layers of transition metal dichalcogenides, MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te), which are closely related to the indirect to direct bandgap transition in monolayers. Here, we report the first direct observation of the transition from indirect to direct bandgap in monolayer samples by using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy on high-quality thin films of MoSe2 with variable thickness, grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The band structure measured experimentally indicates a stronger tendency of monolayer MoSe2 towards a direct bandgap, as well as a larger gap size, than theoretically predicted. Moreover, our finding of a significant spin-splitting of 180 meV at the valence band maximum of a monolayer MoSe2 film could expand its possible application to spintronic devices.
  • Cone beam CT (CBCT) has been widely used for patient setup in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Radiation dose from CBCT scans has become a clinical concern. The purposes of this study are 1) to commission a GPU-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation package gCTD for Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) system and test the calculation accuracy, and 2) to quantitatively evaluate CBCT dose from the OBI system in typical IGRT scan protocols. We first conducted dose measurements in a water phantom. X-ray source model parameters used in gCTD are obtained through a commissioning process. gCTD accuracy is demonstrated by comparing calculations with measurements in water and in CTDI phantoms. 25 brain cancer patients are used to study dose in a standard-dose head protocol, and 25 prostate cancer patients are used to study dose in pelvis protocol and pelvis spotlight protocol. Mean dose to each organ is calculated. Mean dose to 2% voxels that have the highest dose is also computed to quantify the maximum dose. It is found that the mean dose value to an organ varies largely among patients. Moreover, dose distribution is highly non-homogeneous inside an organ. The maximum dose is found to be 1~3 times higher than the mean dose depending on the organ, and is up to 8 times higher for the entire body due to the very high dose region in bony structures. High computational efficiency has also been observed in our studies, such that MC dose calculation time is less than 5 min for a typical case.
  • Patient respiratory signal associated with the cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is important for lung cancer radiotherapy. In contrast to monitoring an external surrogate of respiration, such signal can be extracted directly from the CBCT projections. In this paper, we propose a novel local principle component analysis (LPCA) method to extract the respiratory signal by distinguishing the respiration motion-induced content change from the gantry rotation-induced content change in the CBCT projections. The LPCA method is evaluated by comparing with three state-of-the-art projection-based methods, namely, the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) method, the intensity analysis (IA) method, and the Fourier-transform based phase analysis (FT-p) method. The clinical CBCT projection data of eight patients, acquired under various clinical scenarios, were used to investigate the performance of each method. We found that the proposed LPCA method has demonstrated the best overall performance for cases tested and thus is a promising technique for extracting respiratory signal. We also identified the applicability of each existing method.
  • Simulation of x-ray projection images plays an important role in cone beam CT (CBCT) related research projects. A projection image contains primary signal, scatter signal, and noise. It is computationally demanding to perform accurate and realistic computations for all of these components. In this work, we develop a package on GPU, called gDRR, for the accurate and efficient computations of x-ray projection images in CBCT under clinically realistic conditions. The primary signal is computed by a tri-linear ray-tracing algorithm. A Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is then performed, yielding the primary signal and the scatter signal, both with noise. A denoising process is applied to obtain a smooth scatter signal. The noise component is then obtained by combining the difference between the MC primary and the ray-tracing primary signals, and the difference between the MC simulated scatter and the denoised scatter signals. Finally, a calibration step converts the calculated noise signal into a realistic one by scaling its amplitude. For a typical CBCT projection with a poly-energetic spectrum, the calculation time for the primary signal is 1.2~2.3 sec, while the MC simulations take 28.1~95.3 sec. Computation time for all other steps is negligible. The ray-tracing primary signal matches well with the primary part of the MC simulation result. The MC simulated scatter signal using gDRR is in agreement with EGSnrc results with a relative difference of 3.8%. A noise calibration process is conducted to calibrate gDRR against a real CBCT scanner. The calculated projections are accurate and realistic, such that beam-hardening artifacts and scatter artifacts can be reproduced using the simulated projections. The noise amplitudes in the CBCT images reconstructed from the simulated projections also agree with those in the measured images at corresponding mAs levels.
  • Computed tomography (CT) to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) deformable image registration (DIR) is a crucial step in adaptive radiation therapy. Current intensity-based registration algorithms, such as demons, may fail in the context of CT-CBCT DIR because of inconsistent intensities between the two modalities. In this paper, we propose a variant of demons, called Deformation with Intensity Simultaneously Corrected (DISC), to deal with CT-CBCT DIR. DISC distinguishes itself from the original demons algorithm by performing an adaptive intensity correction step on the CBCT image at every iteration step of the demons registration. Specifically, the intensity correction of a voxel in CBCT is achieved by matching the first and the second moments of the voxel intensities inside a patch around the voxel with those on the CT image. It is expected that such a strategy can remove artifacts in the CBCT image, as well as ensuring the intensity consistency between the two modalities. DISC is implemented on computer graphics processing units (GPUs) in compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming environment. The performance of DISC is evaluated on a simulated patient case and six clinical head-and-neck cancer patient data. It is found that DISC is robust against the CBCT artifacts and intensity inconsistency and significantly improves the registration accuracy when compared with the original demons.
  • While compressed sensing (CS) based reconstructions have been developed for low-dose CBCT, a clear understanding on the relationship between the image quality and imaging dose at low dose levels is needed. In this paper, we qualitatively investigate this subject in a comprehensive manner with extensive experimental and simulation studies. The basic idea is to plot image quality and imaging dose together as functions of number of projections and mAs per projection over the whole clinically relevant range. A clear understanding on the tradeoff between image quality and dose can be achieved and optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols can be developed for various imaging tasks in IGRT. Main findings of this work include: 1) Under the CS framework, image quality has little degradation over a large dose range, and the degradation becomes evident when the dose < 100 total mAs. A dose < 40 total mAs leads to a dramatic image degradation. Optimal low-dose CBCT scan protocols likely fall in the dose range of 40-100 total mAs, depending on the specific IGRT applications. 2) Among different scan protocols at a constant low-dose level, the super sparse-view reconstruction with projection number less than 50 is the most challenging case, even with strong regularization. Better image quality can be acquired with other low mAs protocols. 3) The optimal scan protocol is the combination of a medium number of projections and a medium level of mAs/view. This is more evident when the dose is around 72.8 total mAs or below and when the ROI is a low-contrast or high-resolution object. Based on our results, the optimal number of projections is around 90 to 120. 4) The clinically acceptable lowest dose level is task dependent. In our study, 72.8mAs is a safe dose level for visualizing low-contrast objects, while 12.2 total mAs is sufficient for detecting high-contrast objects of diameter greater than 3 mm.
  • Recently, X-ray imaging dose from computed tomography (CT) or cone beam CT (CBCT) scans has become a serious concern. Patient-specific imaging dose calculation has been proposed for the purpose of dose management. While Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation can be quite accurate for this purpose, it suffers from low computational efficiency. In response to this problem, we have successfully developed a MC dose calculation package, gCTD, on GPU architecture under the NVIDIA CUDA platform for fast and accurate estimation of the x-ray imaging dose received by a patient during a CT or CBCT scan. Techniques have been developed particularly for the GPU architecture to achieve high computational efficiency. Dose calculations using CBCT scanning geometry in a homogeneous water phantom and a heterogeneous Zubal head phantom have shown good agreement between gCTD and EGSnrc, indicating the accuracy of our code. In terms of improved efficiency, it is found that gCTD attains a speed-up of ~400 times in the homogeneous water phantom and ~76.6 times in the Zubal phantom compared to EGSnrc. As for absolute computation time, imaging dose calculation for the Zubal phantom can be accomplished in ~17 sec with the average relative standard deviation of 0.4%. Though our gCTD code has been developed and tested in the context of CBCT scans, with simple modification of geometry it can be used for assessing imaging dose in CT scans as well.
  • This paper is concerned with the stability of steady solutions to initial-boundary-value problems of reaction-hyperbolic systems for axonal transport. Under proper structural assumptions, we clarify the relaxation structure of the reaction-hyperbolic systems and show the time-asymptotic stability of steady solutions or relaxation boundary-layers.
  • This paper is concerned with a class of nonlinear reaction-hyperbolic systems as models for axonal transport in neuroscience. We show the global existence of entropy-satisfying BV-solutions to the initial-value problems by using hyperbolic-type methods. Moreover, we rigorously justify the limit as the biochemical processes are much faster than the transport ones.