• The modification of the effect of interactions of a particle as a function of its pre- and postselected states is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The universality property of this modification in the case of local interactions of a spatially pre- and postselected particle has been found. It allowed to define an operational approach for characterization of the presence of a quantum particle in a particular place: the way it modifies the effect of local interactions. The experiment demonstrating this universality property provides an efficient interferometric alignment method, in which the beam on a single detector throughout one phase scan yields all misalignment parameters.
  • Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum properties, such as entanglement, may exhibit entirely different behavior to purely classical systems. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph and coworkers [T C Ralph, G J Milburn, and T Downes, Phys. Rev. A, 79(2):22121, 2009, T C Ralph and J Pienaar, New Journal of Physics, 16(8):85008, 2014], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Space QUEST (Space - Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission schema.
  • Efficient coupling of single quantum emitters to guided optical modes of integrated optical devices is of high importance for applications in quantum information science as well as in the field of sensing. Here we present the design and fabrication of a platform for on-chip experiments based on dielectric optical single-mode waveguides(Ta2O5 on SiO2). The design of the waveguide is optimized for broadband (600-800 nm) evanescent coupling to a single quantum emitter (expected efficiency: up to 36%) and efficient off-chip coupling to single-mode optical fibers using inverted tapers. First test samples exhibit propagation losses below 1.8 dB/mm and off-chip coupling efficiencies exceeding 57%. These results are promising for efficient coupling of solid state quantum emitters like NV- and SiV-centers to a single optical mode of a nanoscale waveguide.
  • An experimental test of Bell's inequality allows ruling out any local-realistic description of nature by measuring correlations between distant systems. While such tests are conceptually simple, there are strict requirements concerning the detection efficiency of the involved measurements, as well as the enforcement of spacelike separation between the measurement events. Only very recently could both loopholes be closed simultaneously. Here we present a statistically significant, event-ready Bell test based on combining heralded entanglement of atoms separated by $398\,\mathrm{m}$ with fast and efficient measurements of the atomic spin states closing essential loopholes. We obtain a violation with $S=2.221\pm0.033$ (compared to the maximal value of 2 achievable with models based on local hidden variables) which allows us to refute the hypothesis of local-realism with a significance level $P<2.57\cdot10^{-9}$.
  • Autocorrelation is a common method to estimate the duration of ultra-short laser pulses. In the ultra-violet (UV) regime it is increasingly challenging to employ the standard process of second harmonic generation, most prominently due to absorption in nonlinear crystals at very short wavelengths. Here we show how to utilize spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) to generate an autocorrelation signal for UV pulses in the infrared. Our method utilizes the $n^{\text{th}}$ order emission of the SPDC process, which occurs for low pumping powers proportional to the $n^{\text{th}}$ power of the UV intensity. Thus, counting $2n$ down-converted photons directly yields the $n^{\text{th}}$-order autocorrelation. The method, now with detection of near infrared photons with high efficiency, is applied here to the first direct measurement of ultra-short UV-pulses (approximately $176\, \text{fs}$, center wavelength $390\, \text{nm}$) inside a UV enhancement cavity.
  • Quantum communication is a prime space technology application and offers near-term possibilities for long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) and experimental tests of quantum entanglement. However, there exists considerable developmental risks and subsequent costs and time required to raise the technological readiness level of terrestrial quantum technologies and to adapt them for space operations. The small-space revolution is a promising route by which synergistic advances in miniaturization of both satellite systems and quantum technologies can be combined to leap-frog conventional space systems development. Here, we outline a recent proposal to perform orbit-to-ground transmission of entanglement and QKD using a CubeSat platform deployed from the International Space Station (ISS). This ambitious mission exploits advances in nanosatellite attitude determination and control systems (ADCS), miniaturised target acquisition and tracking sensors, compact and robust sources of single and entangled photons, and high-speed classical communications systems, all to be incorporated within a 10 kg 6 litre mass-volume envelope. The CubeSat Quantum Communications Mission (CQuCoM) would be a pathfinder for advanced nanosatellite payloads and operations, and would establish the basis for a constellation of low-Earth orbit trusted-nodes for QKD service provision.
  • A genuinely $N$-partite entangled state may display vanishing $N$-partite correlations measured for arbitrary local observables. In such states the genuine entanglement is noticeable solely in correlations between subsets of particles. A straightforward way to obtain such states for odd $N$ is to design an `anti-state' in which all correlations between an odd number of observers are exactly opposite. Evenly mixing a state with its anti-state then produces a mixed state with no $N$-partite correlations, with many of them genuinely multiparty entangled. Intriguingly, all known examples of `entanglement without correlations' involve an \emph{odd} number of particles. Here we further develop the idea of anti-states, thereby shedding light on the different properties of even and odd particle systems. We conjecture that there is no anti-state to any pure even-$N$-party entangled state making the simple construction scheme unfeasable. However, as we prove by construction, higher-rank examples of `entanglement without correlations' for arbitrary even $N$ indeed exist. These classes of states exhibit genuine entanglement and even violate an $N$-partite Bell inequality, clearly demonstrating the non-classical features of these states as well as showing their applicability for quantum communication complexity tasks.
  • We argue that the modification proposed by Li et al. [Chin. Phys. Lett. 32, 050303 (2015)] to the experiment of Danan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240402 (2013)] does not test the past of the photon as characterised by local weak traces. Instead of answering the questions: (i) Were the photons in A? (ii) Were the photons in B? (iii) Were the photons in C? the proposed experiment measures a degenerate operator answering the questions: (i) Were the photons in A? (ii) Were the photons in B and C together? A negative answer to the last question does not tell us if photons were present in B or C. A simple variation of the modified experiment does provide good evidence for the past of the photon in agreement with the results Danan et al. obtained.
  • It is argued that a weak value of an observable is a robust property of a single pre- and post-selected quantum system rather than a statistical property. During an infinitesimal time a system with a given weak value affects other systems as if it were in an eigenstate with eigenvalue equal to the weak value. This differs significantly from the action of a system pre-selected only and possessing a numerically equal expectation value. The weak value has a physical meaning beyond a conditional average of a pointer in the weak measurement procedure. The difference between the weak value and the expectation value has been demonstrated on the example of photon polarization. In addition, the weak values for systems pre- and post-selected in mixed states are considered.
  • Certifying entanglement of a multipartite state is generally considered as a demanding task. Since an $N$ qubit state is parametrized by $4^{N}-1$ real numbers, one might naively expect that the measurement effort of generic entanglement detection also scales exponentially with $N$. Here, we introduce a general scheme to construct efficient witnesses requiring a constant number of measurements independent of the number of qubits for states like, e.g., Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states, cluster states and Dicke states. For four qubits, we apply this novel method to experimental realizations of the aforementioned states and prove genuine four-partite entanglement with two measurement settings only.
  • We experimentally demonstrate the propagation of long-range surface plasmon-polaritons in a nobel metal stripe waveguide at an optical wavelength of 780 nm. To minimize propagation damping the lithographically structured waveguide is produced from a thin gold stripe embedded in a dielectric polymer. Our waveguide geometry supports a symmetric fundamental and anti-symmetric first order mode. For the fundamental mode we measure a propagation loss of $(6.12^{+0.66} _{-0.54})$ dB/mm, in good agreement with numerical simulations using a vectorial eigenmode solver. Our results are a promising starting point for coupling fluorescence of individual solid state quantum emitters to integrated plasmonic waveguide structures.
  • The statistical nature of measurements alone easily causes unphysical estimates in quantum state tomography. We show that multinomial or Poissonian noise results in eigenvalue distributions converging to the Wigner semicircle distribution for already a modest number of qubits. This enables to specify the number of measurements necessary to avoid unphysical solutions as well as a new approach to obtain physical estimates.
  • Wire-grid polarisers are versatile and scalable components which can be engineered to achieve small sizes and extremely high extinction ratios. Yet the measured performances are always significantly below the predicted values obtained from numerical simulations. Here we report on a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental performances. We show that the discrepancy can be explained by the true shape of the plasmonic structures. Taking into account the fabrication details, a new optimisation model enables us to achieve excellent agreement with the observed response and to re-optimise the grating parameters to ensure experimental extinction ratios well above 1,000 at 850 nm.
  • Non-classical correlations between measurement results make entanglement the essence of quantum physics and the main resource for quantum information applications. Surprisingly, there are $n$-particle states which do not exhibit $n$-partite correlations at all but still are genuinely $n$-partite entangled. We introduce a general construction principle for such states, implement them in a multiphoton experiment and analyze their properties in detail. Remarkably, even without $n$-partite correlations, these states do violate Bell inequalities showing that there is no classical, i.e., local realistic model describing their properties.
  • The appealing feature of quantum key distribution (QKD), from a cryptographic viewpoint, is the ability to prove the information-theoretic security (ITS) of the established keys. As a key establishment primitive, QKD however does not provide a standalone security service in its own: the secret keys established by QKD are in general then used by a subsequent cryptographic applications for which the requirements, the context of use and the security properties can vary. It is therefore important, in the perspective of integrating QKD in security infrastructures, to analyze how QKD can be combined with other cryptographic primitives. The purpose of this survey article, which is mostly centered on European research results, is to contribute to such an analysis. We first review and compare the properties of the existing key establishment techniques, QKD being one of them. We then study more specifically two generic scenarios related to the practical use of QKD in cryptographic infrastructures: 1) using QKD as a key renewal technique for a symmetric cipher over a point-to-point link; 2) using QKD in a network containing many users with the objective of offering any-to-any key establishment service. We discuss the constraints as well as the potential interest of using QKD in these contexts. We finally give an overview of challenges relative to the development of QKD technology that also constitute potential avenues for cryptographic research.
  • Quantum state tomography suffers from the measurement effort increasing exponentially with the number of qubits. Here, we demonstrate permutationally invariant tomography for which, contrary to conventional tomography, all resources scale polynomially with the number of qubits both in terms of the measurement effort as well as the computational power needed to process and store the recorded data. We demonstrate the benefits of combining permutationally invariant tomography with compressed sensing by studying the influence of the pump power on the noise present in a six-qubit symmetric Dicke state, a case where full tomography is possible only for very high pump powers.
  • Common tools for obtaining physical density matrices in experimental quantum state tomography are shown here to cause systematic errors. For example, using maximum likelihood or least squares optimization for state reconstruction, we observe a systematic underestimation of the fidelity and an overestimation of entanglement. A solution for this problem can be achieved by a linear evaluation of the data yielding reliable and computational simple bounds including error bars.
  • A diamond nano-crystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center is optically selected with a confocal scanning microscope and positioned deterministically onto the subwavelength-diameter waist of a tapered optical fiber (TOF) with the help of an atomic force microscope. Based on this nano-manipulation technique we experimentally demonstrate the evanescent coupling of single fluorescence photons emitted by a single NV-center to the guided mode of the TOF. By comparing photon count rates of the fiber-guided and the free-space modes and with the help of numerical FDTD simulations we determine a lower and upper bound for the coupling efficiency of (9.5+/-0.6)% and (10.4+/-0.7)%, respectively. Our results are a promising starting point for future integration of single photon sources into photonic quantum networks and applications in quantum information science.
  • Experimental procedures are presented for the rapid detection of entanglement of unknown arbitrary quantum states. The methods are based on the entanglement criterion using accessible correlations and the principle of correlation complementarity. Our first scheme essentially establishes the Schmidt decomposition for pure states, with few measurements only and without the need for shared reference frames. The second scheme employs a decision tree to speed up entanglement detection. We analyze the performance of the methods using numerical simulations and verify them experimentally for various states of two, three and four qubits.
  • We introduce an experimental procedure for the detection of quantum entanglement of an unknown quantum state with as few measurements as possible. The method requires neither a priori knowledge of the state nor a shared reference frame between the observers. The scheme starts with local measurements, possibly supplemented with suitable filtering, that can be regarded as calibration. Consecutive correlation measurements enable detection of the entanglement of the state. We utilize the fact that the calibration stage essentially establishes the Schmidt decomposition for pure states. Alternatively we develop a decision tree which reveals entanglement within few steps. These methods are illustrated and verified experimentally for various two-qubit entangled states.
  • Feasible tomography schemes for large particle numbers must possess, besides an appropriate data acquisition protocol, also an efficient way to reconstruct the density operator from the observed finite data set. Since state reconstruction typically requires the solution of a non-linear large-scale optimization problem, this is a major challenge in the design of scalable tomography schemes. Here we present an efficient state reconstruction scheme for permutationally invariant quantum state tomography. It works for all common state-of-the-art reconstruction principles, including, in particular, maximum likelihood and least squares methods, which are the preferred choices in today's experiments. This high efficiency is achieved by greatly reducing the dimensionality of the problem employing a particular representation of permutationally invariant states known from spin coupling combined with convex optimization, which has clear advantages regarding speed, control and accuracy in comparison to commonly employed numerical routines. First prototype implementations easily allow reconstruction of a state of 20 qubits in a few minutes on a standard computer.
  • We present a simple but highly efficient source of polarization-entangled photons based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in bulk periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate crystals (PPKTP) pumped by a 405 nm laser diode. Utilizing one of the highest available nonlinear coefficients in a non-degenerate, collinear type-0 phase-matching configuration, we generate polarization entanglement via the crossed-crystal scheme and detect 0.64 million photon pair events/s/mW, while maintaining an overlap fidelity with the ideal Bell state of 0.98 at a pump power of 0.025 mW.
  • The Fisher information $F$ gives a limit to the ultimate precision achievable in a phase estimation protocol. It has been shown recently that the Fisher information for a linear two-mode interferometer cannot exceed the number of particles if the input state is separable. As a direct consequence, with such input states the shot-noise limit is the ultimate limit of precision. In this work, we go a step further by deducing bounds on $F$ for several multiparticle entanglement classes. These bounds imply that genuine multiparticle entanglement is needed for reaching the highest sensitivities in quantum interferometry. We further compute similar bounds on the average Fisher information $\bar F$ for collective spin operators, where the average is performed over all possible spin directions. We show that these criteria detect different sets of states and illustrate their strengths by considering several examples, also using experimental data. In particular, the criterion based on $\bar F$ is able to detect certain bound entangled states.
  • Multi-photon interference reveals strictly non-classical phenomena. Its applications range from fundamental tests of quantum mechanics to photonic quantum information processing, where a significant fraction of key experiments achieved so far comes from multi-photon state manipulation. We review the progress, both theoretical and experimental, of this rapidly advancing research. The emphasis is given to the creation of photonic entanglement of various forms, tests of the completeness of quantum mechanics (in particular, violations of local realism), quantum information protocols for quantum communication (e.g., quantum teleportation, entanglement purification and quantum repeater), and quantum computation with linear optics. We shall limit the scope of our review to "few photon" phenomena involving measurements of discrete observables.
  • We experimentally demonstrate a general criterion to identify entangled states useful for the estimation of an unknown phase shift with a sensitivity higher than the shot-noise limit. We show how to exploit this entanglement on the examples of a maximum likelihood as well as of a Bayesian phase estimation protocol. Using an entangled four-photon state we achieve a phase sensitivity clearly beyond the shot-noise limit. Our detailed comparison of methods and quantum states for entanglement enhanced metrology reveals the connection between multiparticle entanglement and sub-shot-noise uncertainty, both in a frequentist and in a Bayesian phase estimation setting.