• In this work, we analyze the performance of the uplink (UL) of a massive MIMO network considering an asymptotically large number of antennas at base stations (BSs). We model the locations of BSs as a homogeneous Poisson point process (PPP) and assume that their service regions are limited to their respective Poisson-Voronoi cells (PVCs). Further, for each PVC, based on a threshold radius, we model the cell center (CC) region as the Johnson-Mehl (JM) cell of its BS while rest of the PVC is deemed as the cell edge (CE) region. The CC and CE users are located uniformly at random independently of each other in the JM cell and CE region, respectively. In addition, we consider a fractional pilot reuse (FPR) scheme where two different sets of pilot sequences are used for CC and CE users with the objective of reducing the interference due to pilot contamination for CE users. Based on the above system model, we derive analytical expressions for the UL signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio (SINR) coverage probability and average spectral efficiency (SE) for randomly selected CC and CE users. In addition, we present an approximate expression for the average cell SE. One of the key intermediate results in our analysis is the approximate but accurate characterization of the distributions of the CC and CE areas of a typical cell. Another key intermediate step is the accurate characterization of the pair correlation functions of the point processes formed by the interfering CC and CE users that subsequently enables the coverage probability analysis. From our system analysis, we present a partitioning rule for the number of pilot sequences to be used for CC and CE users as a function of threshold radius that improves the average CE user SE while achieving similar CC user SE with respect to unity pilot reuse.
  • This paper analyzes the performance of a vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) modeled as a Cox process, where the spatial layout of the roads is modeled by a Poisson line process (PLP) and the locations of nodes on each line are modeled as a 1D Poisson point process (PPP). For this setup, we characterize the success probability of a typical link and the area spectral efficiency (ASE) of the network assuming slotted ALOHA as the channel access scheme. We then concretely establish that the success probability of a typical link in a VANET modeled using a Cox process converges to that of a 1D and 2D PPP for some extreme values of the line and node densities. We also study the trends in success probability as a function of the system parameters and show that the optimum transmission probability that maximizes the ASE for this Cox process model differs significantly from those of the relatively-simpler 1D and 2D PPP models used commonly in the literature to model vehicular networks.
  • The success of Internet-of-Things (IoT) paradigm relies on, among other things, developing energy-efficient communication techniques that can enable information exchange among billions of battery-operated IoT devices. With its technological capability of simultaneous information and energy transfer, ambient backscatter is quickly emerging as an appealing solution for this communication paradigm, especially for the links with low data rate requirement. In this paper, we study signal detection and characterize exact bit error rate for the ambient backscatter system. In particular, we formulate a binary hypothesis testing problem at the receiver and analyze system performance under three detection techniques: a) mean threshold (MT), b) maximum likelihood threshold (MLT), and c) approximate MLT. Motivated by the energy-constrained nature of IoT devices, we perform the above analyses for two receiver types: i) the ones that can accurately track channel state information (CSI), and ii) the ones that cannot. Two main features of the analysis that distinguish this work from the prior art are the characterization of the exact conditional density functions of the average received signal energy, and the characterization of exact average bit error rate (BER) for this setup. The key challenge lies in the handling of correlation between channel gains of two hypotheses for the derivation of joint probability distribution of magnitude squared channel gains that is needed for the BER analysis.
  • Owing to the ubiquitous availability of radio-frequency (RF) signals, RF energy harvesting is emerging as an appealing solution for powering IoT devices. In this paper, we model and analyze an IoT network which harvests RF energy and receives information from the same wireless network. In order to enable this operation, each time slot is partitioned into charging and information reception phases. For this setup, we characterize two performance metrics: (i) energy coverage and (ii) joint signal-to-interference-plus-noise (SINR) and energy coverage. The analysis is performed using a realistic spatial model that captures the spatial coupling between the locations of the IoT devices and the nodes of the wireless network (referred henceforth as the IoT gateways), which is often ignored in the literature. In particular, we model the locations of the IoT devices using a Poisson cluster process (PCP) and assume that some of the clusters have IoT gateways (GWs) deployed at their centers while the other GWs are deployed independently of the IoT devices. The level of coupling can be controlled by tuning the fraction of total GWs that are deployed at the cluster centers. Due to the inherent intractability of computing the distribution of shot noise process for this setup, we propose two accurate approximations, using which the aforementioned metrics are characterized. Multiple system design insights are drawn from our results. For instance, we demonstrate the existence of optimal slot partitioning that maximizes the system throughput. In addition, we explore the effect of the level of coupling between the locations of the IoT devices and the GWs on this optimal slot partitioning. Particularly, our results reveal that the optimal value of time duration for the charging phase increases as the level of coupling decreases.
  • In localization, an outage occurs if the positioning error exceeds a pre-defined threshold, $\epsilon_{\rm th}$. For time-of-arrival based localization, a key factor affecting the positioning error is the relative positions of the anchors, with respect to the target location. Specifically, the positioning error is a function of (a) the distance-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the anchor-target links, and (b) the pairwise angles subtended by the anchors at the target location. From a design perspective, characterizing the distribution of the positioning error over an ensemble of target and anchor locations is essential for providing probabilistic performance guarantees against outage. To solve this difficult problem, previous works have assumed all links to have the same SNR (i.e., SNR homogeneity), which neglects the impact of distance variation among the anchors on the positioning error. In this paper, we model SNR heterogeneity among anchors using a distance-dependent pathloss model and derive an accurate approximation for the error complementary cumulative distribution function (ccdf). By highlighting the accuracy of our results, relative to previous ones that ignore SNR heterogeneity, we concretely demonstrate that SNR heterogeneity has a considerable impact on the error distribution.
  • Motivated by the need to ensure timely delivery of information (e.g., status updates) in the Internet-of-things (IoT) paradigm, this paper investigates the role of an Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) as a mobile relay to minimize the average Peak Age-of-information (PAoI) for a source-destination pair. For this setup, we formulate an optimization problem to jointly optimize the UAV's flight trajectory as well as energy and service time allocations for packet transmissions. In order to solve this non-convex problem, we propose an efficient iterative algorithm and establish its convergence analytically. Closed-form solutions for some sub-problems are also provided. One of the sub-problems we solve in this procedure is to jointly optimize the energy and service time allocations for a given trajectory of the UAV. This problem is of interest on its own right because in some cases we may not be able to alter the UAV's trajectory based on the locations of the IoT devices (especially when its primary mission is something else). Our numerical results quantify the gains that can be achieved by additionally optimizing the UAV's trajectory.
  • In this letter, we introduce a general cellular network model where i) users and BSs are distributed as two general point processes that may be coupled, ii) pathloss is assumed to follow a multi-slope power-law pathloss model, and iii) fading (power) is assumed to be independent across all wireless links. For this setup, we first obtain a set of contours representing the same meta distribution of SIR, which is the distribution of the conditional coverage probability given the point process, for different values of the parameters of the pathloss function and BS and user point processes. This general result is then specialized to 3GPP-inspired user and BS configurations obtained by combining Poisson point process (PPP) and Poisson cluster process (PCP).
  • With the increasing network densification, it has become exceedingly difficult to provide traditional fiber backhaul access to each cell site, which is especially true for small cell base stations (SBSs). The increasing maturity of millimeter wave (mmWave) communication has opened up the possibility of providing high-speed wireless backhaul to such cell sites. Since mmWave is also suitable for access links, the third generation partnership project (3GPP) is envisioning an integrated access and backhaul (IAB) architecture for the fifth generation (5G) cellular networks in which the same infrastructure and spectral resources will be used for both access and backhaul. In this paper, we develop an analytical framework for IAB-enabled cellular network using which we provide an accurate characterization of its downlink rate coverage probability. Using this, we study the performance of three backhaul bandwidth (BW) partition strategies, (i) equal partition: when all SBSs obtain equal share of the backhaul BW, (ii) instantaneous load-based partition: when the backhaul BW share of an SBS is proportional to its instantaneous load, and (iii) average load-based partition: when the backhaul BW share of an SBS is proportional to its average load. Our analysis shows that depending on the choice of the partition strategy, there exists an optimal split of access and backhaul BW for which the rate coverage is maximized. Further, there exists a critical volume of cell-load (total number of users) beyond which the gains provided by the IAB-enabled network disappear and its performance converges to that of the traditional macro-only network with no SBSs.
  • Cache-enabled Device-to-Device (D2D) communication is widely recognized as one of the key components of the emerging fifth generation (5G) cellular network architecture. However, conventional half-duplex (HD) transmission may not be sufficient to provide fast enough content delivery over D2D links in order to meet strict latency targets of emerging D2D applications. In-band full-duplex (FD), with its capability of allowing simultaneous transmission and reception, can improve spectral efficiency and reduce latency by providing more content delivery opportunities. In this paper, we consider a finite network of D2D nodes in which each node is endowed with FD capability. We first carefully list all possible operating modes for an arbitrary device using which we compute the number of devices that are actively transmitting at any given time. We then characterize network performance in terms of the success probability, which depends on the content availability, signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) distribution, as well as the operating mode of the D2D receiver. Our analysis concretely demonstrates that caching dictates the system performance in lower target SIR thresholds whereas interference dictates the performance at the higher target SIR thresholds.
  • In localization applications, the line-of-sight between anchors and targets may be blocked by obstacles in the environment. A target without line-of-sight to enough number of anchors cannot be unambiguously localized and is, therefore, said to be in a blind-spot. In this paper, we analyze the blind-spot probability of a typical target by using stochastic geometry to model the randomness in the obstacle and anchor locations. In doing so, we handle correlated anchor blocking induced by obstacles, unlike previous works that assume independent anchor blocking. We first characterize the regime over which the independent blocking assumption underestimates the blind-spot probability of the typical target, which in turn, is characterized as a function of the distribution of the unshadowed area, as seen from the target location. Since this distribution is difficult to characterize exactly, we formulate the nearest two-obstacle approximation, which is equivalent to considering correlated blocking for only the nearest two obstacles from the target and assuming independent blocking for the remaining obstacles. Based on this, we derive a closed-form (approximate) expression for the blind-spot probability, which helps determine the anchor deployment intensity needed for the blind-spot probability of a typical target to be at most a threshold, $\mu$.
  • With the increasing network densification, it has become exceedingly difficult to provide traditional fiber backhaul access to each cell site, which is especially true for small cell base stations (SBSs). The increasing maturity of millimeter wave (mmWave) communication has opened up the possibility of providing high-speed wireless backhaul to such cell sites. Since mmWave is also suitable for access links, the third generation partnership project (3GPP) is envisioning an integrated access and backhaul (IAB) architecture for the fifth generation (5G) cellular networks in which the same infrastructure and spectral resources will be used for both access and backhaul. In this paper, we develop an analytical framework for IAB-enabled cellular network using which we provide an accurate characterization of its downlink rate coverage probability. Using this, we study the performance of two backhaul bandwidth (BW) partition strategies, (i) equal partition: when all SBSs obtain equal share of the backhaul BW, and (ii) load-based partition: when the backhaul BW share of an SBS is proportional to its load. Our analysis shows that depending on the choice of the partition strategy, there exists an optimal split of access and backhaul BW for which the rate coverage is maximized. Further, there exists a critical volume of cell-load (total number of users) beyond which the gains provided by the IAB-enabled network disappear and its performance converges to that of the traditional macro-only network with no SBSs.
  • In this paper, we consider a vehicular network in which the wireless nodes are located on a system of roads. We model the roadways, which are predominantly straight and randomly oriented, by a Poisson line process (PLP) and the locations of nodes on each road as a homogeneous 1D Poisson point process (PPP). Assuming that each node transmits independently, the locations of transmitting and receiving nodes are given by two Cox processes driven by the same PLP. For this setup, we derive the coverage probability of a typical receiver, which is an arbitrarily chosen receiving node, assuming independent Nakagami-$m$ fading over all wireless channels. Assuming that the typical receiver connects to its closest transmitting node in the network, we first derive the distribution of the distance between the typical receiver and the serving node to characterize the desired signal power. We then characterize coverage probability for this setup, which involves two key technical challenges. First, we need to handle several cases as the serving node can possibly be located on any line in the network and the corresponding interference experienced at the typical receiver is different in each case. Second, conditioning on the serving node imposes constraints on the spatial configuration of lines, which require careful analysis of the conditional distribution of the lines. We address these challenges in order to accurately characterize the interference experienced at the typical receiver. We then derive an exact expression for coverage probability in terms of the derivative of Laplace transform of interference power distribution. We analyze the trends in coverage probability as a function of the network parameters: line density and node density. We also study the asymptotic behavior of this model and compare the coverage performance with that of a homogeneous 2D PPP model with the same node density.
  • In this letter, we derive the cumulative density function (CDF) of the nearest neighbor and contact distance distributions of the Matern cluster process (MCP) in R2. These results will be useful in the performance analysis of many real-world wireless networks that exhibit inter-node attraction. Using these results, we concretely demonstrate that the contact distance of the MCP stochastically dominates its nearest-neighbor distance as well as the contact distance of the homogeneous Poisson point process (PPP) with the same density.
  • In a localization network, the line-of-sight between anchors (transceivers) and targets may be blocked due to the presence of obstacles in the environment. Due to the non-zero size of the obstacles, the blocking is typically correlated across both anchor and target locations, with the extent of correlation increasing with obstacle size. If a target does not have line-of-sight to a minimum number of anchors, then its position cannot be estimated unambiguously and is, therefore, said to be in a blind-spot. However, the analysis of the blind-spot probability of a given target is challenging due to the inherent randomness in the obstacle locations and sizes. In this letter, we develop a new framework to analyze the worst-case impact of correlated blocking on the blind-spot probability of a typical target; in particular, we model the obstacles by a Poisson line process and the anchor locations by a Poisson point process. For this setup, we define the notion of the asymptotic blind-spot probability of the typical target and derive a closed-form expression for it as a function of the area distribution of a typical Poisson-Voronoi cell. As an upper bound for the more realistic case when obstacles have finite dimensions, the asymptotic blind-spot probability is useful as a design tool to ensure that the blind-spot probability of a typical target does not exceed a desired threshold, $\epsilon$.
  • This paper characterizes the statistics of effective fading gain in multi-tier cellular networks with strongest base station (BS) cell association policy. First, we derive the probability of association with the $n$-th nearest BS in the $k$-th tier. Next, we use this result to derive the probability density function (PDF) of the channel fading gain (effective fading) experienced by the user when associating with the strongest BS. Interestingly, our results show that the effective channel gain distribution solely depends upon the original channel fading and the path-loss exponent. Moreover, we show that in the case of Nakagami-$m$ fading channels (Gamma distribution), the distribution of the effective fading is also Gamma but with a gain of $\frac{\alpha}{2}$ in the shape parameter, where $\alpha$ is the path-loss exponent.
  • This paper studies the secrecy performance of a wireless network (primary network) overlaid with an ambient RF energy harvesting IoT network (secondary network). The nodes in the secondary network are assumed to be solely powered by ambient RF energy harvested from the transmissions of the primary network. We assume that the secondary nodes can eavesdrop on the primary transmissions due to which the primary network uses secrecy guard zones. The primary transmitter goes silent if any secondary receiver is detected within its guard zone. Using tools from stochastic geometry, we derive the probability of successful connection of the primary network as well as the probability of secure communication. Two conditions must be jointly satisfied in order to ensure successful connection: (i) the SINR at the primary receiver is above a predefined threshold, and (ii) the primary transmitter is not silent. In order to ensure secure communication, the SINR value at each of the secondary nodes should be less than a predefined threshold. Clearly, when more secondary nodes are deployed, more primary transmitters will remain silent for a given guard zone radius, thus impacting the amount of energy harvested by the secondary network. Our results concretely show the existence of an optimal deployment density for the secondary network that maximizes the density of nodes that are able to harvest sufficient amount of energy. Furthermore, we show the dependence of this optimal deployment density on the guard zone radius of the primary network. In addition, we show that the optimal guard zone radius selected by the primary network is a function of the deployment density of the secondary network. This interesting coupling between the two networks is studied using tools from game theory. Overall, this work is one of the few concrete works that symbiotically merge tools from stochastic geometry and game theory.
  • Ambient radio frequency (RF) energy harvesting has emerged as a promising solution for powering small devices and sensors in massive Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem due to its ubiquity and cost efficiency. In this paper, we study joint uplink and downlink coverage of cellular-based ambient RF energy harvesting IoT where the cellular network is assumed to be the only source of RF energy. We consider a time division-based approach for power and information transmission where each time-slot is partitioned into three sub-slots: (i) charging sub-slot during which the cellular base stations (BSs) act as RF chargers for the IoT devices, which then use the energy harvested in this sub-slot for information transmission and/or reception during the remaining two sub-slots, (ii) downlink sub-slot during which the IoT device receives information from the associated BS, and (iii) uplink sub-slot during which the IoT device transmits information to the associated BS. For this setup, we characterize the joint coverage probability, which is the joint probability of the events that the typical device harvests sufficient energy in the given time slot and is under both uplink and downlink signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) coverage with respect to its associated BS. This metric significantly generalizes the prior art on energy harvesting communications, which usually focused on downlink or uplink coverage separately. The key technical challenge is in handling the correlation between the amount of energy harvested in the charging sub-slot and the information signal quality (SINR) in the downlink and uplink sub-slots. Dominant BS-based approach is developed to derive tight approximation for this joint coverage probability. Several system design insights including comparison with regularly powered IoT network and throughput-optimal slot partitioning are also provided.
  • One of the principal underlying assumptions of current approaches to the analysis of heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) with random spatial models is the uniform distribution of users independent of the base station (BS) locations. This assumption is not quite accurate, especially for user-centric capacity-driven small cell deployments where low-power BSs are deployed in the areas of high user density, thus inducing a natural correlation in the BS and user locations. In order to capture this correlation, we enrich the existing K-tier Poisson Point Process (PPP) HetNet model by considering user locations as Poisson Cluster Process (PCP) with the BSs at the cluster centers. In particular, we provide the formal analysis of the downlink coverage probability in terms of a general density functions describing the locations of users around the BSs. The derived results are specialized for two cases of interest: (i) Thomas cluster process, where the locations of the users around BSs are Gaussian distributed, and (ii) Mat\'ern cluster process, where the users are uniformly distributed inside a disc of a given radius. Tight closed-form bounds for the coverage probability in these two cases are also derived. Our results demonstrate that the coverage probability decreases as the size of user clusters around BSs increases, ultimately collapsing to the result obtained under the assumption of PPP distribution of users independent of the BS locations when the cluster size goes to infinity. Using these results, we also handle mixed user distributions consisting of two types of users: (i) uniformly distributed, and (ii) clustered around certain tiers.
  • In this letter, we derive new lower bounds on the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the contact distance in the Poisson Hole Process (PHP) for two cases: (i) reference point is selected uniformly at random from $\mathbb{R}^2$ independently of the PHP, and (ii) reference point is located at the center of a hole selected uniformly at random from the PHP. While one can derive upper bounds on the CDF of contact distance by simply ignoring the effect of holes, deriving lower bounds is known to be relatively more challenging. As a part of our proof, we introduce a tractable way of bounding the effect of all the holes in a PHP, which can be used to study other properties of a PHP as well.
  • The growing complexity of heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) has necessitated a variety of user and base station (BS) configurations to be considered for realistic performance evaluation and system design. This is directly reflected in the HetNet simulation models proposed by standardization bodies, such as the third generation partnership project (3GPP). Complementary to these simulation models, stochastic geometry-based approach, modeling the locations of the users and the K tiers of BSs as independent and homogeneous Poisson point processes (PPPs), has gained prominence in the past few years. Despite its success in revealing useful insights, this PPP-based K-tier HetNet model is not rich enough to capture spatial coupling between user and BS locations that exists in real-world HetNet deployments and is included in 3GPP simulation models. In this paper, we demonstrate that modeling a fraction of users and arbitrary number of BS tiers alternatively with a Poisson cluster process (PCP) captures the aforementioned coupling, thus bridging the gap between the 3GPP simulation models and the PPP-based analytic model for HetNets. We further show that the downlink coverage probability of a typical user under maximum signal-to-interference-ratio association can be expressed in terms of the sum-product functionals over PPP, PCP, and its associated offspring point process, which are all characterized as a part of our analysis. We also show that the proposed model converges to the PPP-based HetNet model as the cluster size of the PCPs tends to infinity. Finally, we specialize our analysis based on general PCPs for Thomas and Matern cluster processes. Special instances of the proposed model closely resemble the different configurations for BS and user locations considered in 3GPP simulations.
  • This letter presents a performance comparison of two popular secrecy enhancement techniques in wireless networks: (i) creating guard zones by restricting transmissions of legitimate transmitters whenever any eavesdropper is detected in their vicinity, and (ii) adding artificial noise to the confidential messages to make it difficult for the eavesdroppers to decode them. Focusing on a noise-limited regime, we use tools from stochastic geometry to derive the secrecy outage probability at the eavesdroppers as well as the coverage probability at the legitimate users for both these techniques. Using these results, we derive a threshold on the density of the eavesdroppers below which no secrecy enhancing technique is required to ensure a target secrecy outage probability. For eavesdropper densities above this threshold, we concretely characterize the regimes in which each technique outperforms the other. Our results demonstrate that guard zone technique is better when the distances between the transmitters and their legitimate receivers are higher than a certain threshold.
  • This paper develops a new approach to the modeling and analysis of HetNets that accurately incorporates coupling across the locations of users and base stations, which exists due to the deployment of small cell base stations (SBSs) at the places of high user density (termed user hotspots in this paper). Modeling the locations of the geographical centers of user hotspots as a homogeneous Poisson Point Process (PPP), we assume that the users and SBSs are clustered around each user hotspot center independently with two different distributions. The macrocell base station (BS) locations are modeled by an independent PPP. This model is consistent with the user and SBS configurations considered by 3GPP. Using this model, we study the performance of a typical user in terms of coverage probability and throughput for two association policies: i) Policy 1, under which a typical user is served by the open-access BS that provides maximum averaged received power, and ii) Policy 2, under which the typical user is served by the small cell tier if the maximum averaged received power from the open-access SBSs is greater than a certain power threshold; and macro tier otherwise. A key intermediate step in our analysis is the derivation of distance distributions from a typical user to the open-access and closed-access interfering SBSs. Our analysis demonstrates that as the number of SBSs reusing the same resource block increases, coverage probability decreases whereas throughput increases. Therefore, contrary to the usual assumption of orthogonal channelization, it is reasonable to assign the same resource block to multiple SBSs in a given cluster as long as the coverage probability remains acceptable. This approach to HetNet modeling and analysis significantly generalizes the state-of-the-art approaches that are based on modeling the locations of BSs and users by independent PPPs.
  • Heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) usually exhibit spatial separation amongst base stations (BSs) of different types (termed tiers in this paper). For instance, operators will usually not deploy a picocell in close proximity to a macrocell, thus inducing separation amongst the locations of pico and macrocells. This separation has recently been captured by modeling the small cell locations by a Poisson Hole Process (PHP) with the hole centers being the locations of the macrocells. Due to the presence of exclusion zones, the analysis of the resulting model is significantly more complex compared to the more popular Poisson Point Process (PPP) based models. In this paper, we derive a tight bound on the distribution of the distance of a typical user to the closest point of a PHP. Since the exact distribution of this distance is not known, it is often approximated in the literature. For this model, we then provide tight characterization of the downlink coverage probability for a typical user in a two-tier closed-access HCN under two cases: (i) typical user is served by the closest macrocell, and (ii) typical user is served by its closest small cell. The proposed approach can be extended to analyze other relevant cases of interest, e.g., coverage in a PHP-based open access HCN.
  • Caching popular content in the storage of small cells is being considered as an efficient technique to complement limited backhaul of small cells in ultra-dense heterogeneous cellular networks. Limited storage capacity of the small cells renders it important to determine the optimal set of files (cache) to be placed on each small cell. In contrast to prior works on optimal caching, in this work we study the effect of retransmissions on the optimal cache placement policy for both static and mobile user scenarios. With the popularity of files modeled as a Zipf distribution and a maximum n transmissions, i.e., n-1 retransmissions, allowed to receive each file, we determine the optimal caching probability of the files that maximizes the hit probability. Our closed-form optimal solutions concretely demonstrate that the optimal caching probabilities are very sensitive to the number of retransmissions.
  • The growing complexity of heterogeneous cellular networks (HetNets) has necessitated the need to consider variety of user and base station (BS) configurations for realistic performance evaluation and system design. This is directly reflected in the HetNet simulation models considered by standardization bodies, such as the third generation partnership project (3GPP). Complementary to these simulation models, stochastic geometry based approach modeling the user and BS locations as independent and homogeneous Poisson point processes (PPPs) has gained prominence in the past few years. Despite its success in revealing useful insights, this PPP-based model is not rich enough to capture all the spatial configurations that appear in real world HetNet deployments (on which 3GPP simulation models are based). In this paper, we bridge the gap between the 3GPP simulation models and the popular PPP-based analytical model by developing a new unified HetNet model in which a fraction of users and some BS tiers are modeled as Poisson cluster processes (PCPs). This model captures both non-uniformity and coupling in the BS and user locations. For this setup, we derive exact expression for downlink coverage probability under maximum signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) cell association model. As intermediate results, we define and evaluate sum-product functionals for PPP and PCP. Special instances of the proposed model are shown to closely resemble different configurations considered in 3GPP HetNet models. Our results concretely demonstrate that the performance trends are highly sensitive to the assumptions made on the user and SBS configurations.