• We report the design, fabrication and characterization of ultralight highly emissive metaphotonic structures with record-low mass/area that emit thermal radiation efficiently over a broad spectral (2 to 35 microns) and angular (0-60 degrees) range. The structures comprise one to three pairs of alternating nanometer-scale metallic and dielectric layers, and have measured effective 300 K hemispherical emissivities of 0.7 to 0.9. To our knowledge, these structures, which are all subwavelength in thickness are the lightest reported metasurfaces with comparable infrared emissivity. The superior optical properties, together with their mechanical flexibility, low outgassing, and low areal mass, suggest that these metasurfaces are candidates for thermal management in applications demanding of ultralight flexible structures, including aerospace applications, ultralight photovoltaics, lightweight flexible electronics, and textiles for thermal insulation.
  • The incorporation of electrically tunable materials into photonic structures such as waveguides and metasurfaces enables dynamic control of light propagation by an applied potential. While many materials have been shown to exhibit electrically tunable permittivity and dispersion, including transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) and III-V semiconductors and quantum wells, these materials are all optically isotropic in the propagation plane. In this work, we report the first known example of electrically tunable linear dichroism, observed here in few-layer black phosphorus (BP), which is a promising candidate for multi-functional, broadband, tunable photonic elements. We measure active modulation of the linear dichroism from the mid-infrared to visible frequency range, which is driven by anisotropic quantum-confined Stark and Burstein-Moss effects, and field-induced forbidden-to-allowed optical transitions. Moreover, we observe high BP absorption modulation strengths, approaching unity for certain thicknesses and photon energies.
  • Single-photon and correlated two-photon sources are important elements for optical information systems. Nonlinear downconversion light sources are robust and stable emitters of single photons and entangled photon pairs. However, the rate of downconverted light emission, dictated by the properties of low-symmetry nonlinear crystals, is typically very small, leading to significant constrains in device design and integration. In this paper, we show that the principles for spontaneous emission control (i.e. Purcell effect) of isolated emitters in nanoscale structures, such as metamaterials, can be generalized to describe the enhancement of nonlinear light generation processes such as parametric down conversion. We develop a novel theoretical framework for quantum nonlinear emission in a general anisotropic, dispersive and lossy media. We further find that spontaneous parametric downconversion in media with hyperbolic dispersion is broadband and phase-mismatch-free. We predict a 1000-fold enhancement of the downconverted emission rate with up to 105 photon pairs per second in experimentally realistic nanostructures. Our theoretical formalism and approach to Purcell enhancement of nonlinear optical processes, provides a framework for description of quantum nonlinear optical phenomena in complex nanophotonic structures.
  • Traditional concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems utilize multijunction cells to minimize thermalization losses, but cannot efficiently capture diffuse sunlight, which contributes to a high levelized cost of energy (LCOE) and limits their use to geographical regions with high direct sunlight insolation. Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harness light generated by luminophores embedded in a light-trapping waveguide to concentrate light onto smaller cells. LSCs can absorb both direct and diffuse sunlight, and thus can operate as flat plate receivers at a fixed tilt and with a conventional module form factor. However, current LSCs experience significant power loss through parasitic luminophore absorption and incomplete light trapping by the optical waveguide. Here we introduce a tandem LSC device architecture that overcomes both of these limitations, consisting of a PLMA polymer layer with embedded CdSe/CdS quantum dot (QD) luminophores and InGaP micro-cells, which serve as a high bandgap absorber on top of a conventional Si photovoltaic. We experimentally synthesize CdSe/CdS QDs with exceptionally high quantum-yield (99%) and ultra-narrowband emission optimally matched to fabricated III-V InGaP micro-cells. Using a Monte Carlo ray-tracing model, we show the radiative limit power conversion efficiency for a module with these components to be 30.8% diffuse sunlight conditions. These results indicate that a tandem LSC-on-Si architecture could significantly improve upon the efficiency of a conventional Si photovoltaic module with simple and straightforward alterations of the module lamination steps of a Si photovoltaic manufacturing process, with promise for widespread module deployment across diverse geographical regions and energy markets.
  • 2D materials provide a platform for strong light--matter interactions, creating wide-ranging design opportunities via new-material discoveries and new methods for geometrical structuring. We derive general upper bounds to the strength of such light--matter interactions, given only the optical conductivity of the material, including spatial nonlocality, and otherwise independent of shape and configuration. Our material figure of merit shows that highly doped graphene is an optimal material at infrared frequencies, whereas single-atomic-layer silver is optimal in the visible. For quantities ranging from absorption and scattering to near-field spontaneous-emission enhancements and radiative heat transfer, we consider canonical geometrical structures and show that in certain cases the bounds can be approached, while in others there may be significant opportunity for design improvement. The bounds can encourage systematic improvements in the design of ultrathin broadband absorbers, 2D antennas, and near-field energy harvesters.
  • Plasmonic hot carrier devices extract excited carriers from metal nanostructures before equilibration, and have the potential to surpass semiconductor light absorbers. However their efficiencies have so far remained well below theoretical limits, which necessitates quantitative prediction of carrier transport and energy loss in plasmonic structures to identify and overcome bottlenecks in carrier harvesting. Here, we present a theoretical and computational framework, Non-Equilibrium Scattering in Space and Energy (NESSE), to predict the spatial evolution of carrier energy distributions that combines the best features of phase-space (Boltzmann) and particle-based (Monte Carlo) methods. Within the NESSE framework, we bridge first-principles electronic structure predictions of plasmon decay and carrier collision integrals at the atomic scale, with electromagnetic field simulations at the nano- to mesoscale. Finally, we apply NESSE to predict spatially-resolved energy distributions of photo-excited carriers that impact the surface of experimentally realizable plasmonic nanostructures at length scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of nanometers, enabling first-principles design of hot carrier devices.
  • We report experimental measurements for ultrathin (< 15 nm) van der Waals heterostructures exhibiting external quantum efficiencies exceeding 50%, and show that these structures can achieve experimental absorbance > 90%. By coupling electromagnetic simulations and experimental measurements, we show that pn WSe2/MoS2 heterojunctions with vertical carrier collection can have internal photocarrier collection efficiencies exceeding 70%.
  • Recent rapid progress in efficiencies for solar water splitting by photoelectrochemical devices has enhanced its prospects to enable storable renewable energy. Efficient solar fuel generators all use tandem photoelectrode structures, and advanced integrated devices incorporate corrosion protection layers as well as heterogeneous catalysts. Realization of near thermodynamic limiting performance requires tailoring the energy band structure of the photoelectrode and also the optical and electronic properties of the surface layers exposed to the electrolyte. Here, we report a monolithic device architecture that exhibits reduced surface reflectivity in conjunction with metallic Rh nanoparticle catalyst layers that minimize parasitic light absorption. Additionally, the anatase TiO2 protection layer on the photocathode creates a favorable internal band alignment for hydrogen evolution. An initial solar-to-hydrogen efficiency of 19.3 % is obtained in acidic electrolyte and an efficiency of 18.5 % is achieved at neutral pH condition (under simulated sunlight).
  • Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a promising two-dimensional insulator with a large band gap and low density of charged impurities that is isostructural and isoelectronic with graphene. Here we report the chemical and atomic-scale structure of CVD-grown wafer-scale (~25 cm2) h-BN sheets ranging in thickness from 1-20 monolayers. Atomic-scale images of h-BN on Au and graphene/Au substrates obtained by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) reveal high h-BN crystalline quality in monolayer samples. Further characterization of 1-20 monolayer samples indicates uniform thickness for wafer-scale areas; this thickness control is a result of precise control of the precursor flow rate, deposition temperature and pressure. Raman and infrared spectroscopy indicate the presence of B-N bonds and reveal a linear dependence of thickness with growth time. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows the film stoichiometry, and the B/N atom ratio in our films is 1 + 0.6% across the range of thicknesses. Electrical current transport in metal/insulator/metal (Au/h-BN/Au) heterostructures indicates that our CVD-grown h-BN films can act as excellent tunnel barriers with a high hard-breakdown field strength. Our results suggest that large-area h-BN films are structurally, chemically and electronically uniform over the wafer scale, opening the door to pervasive application as a dielectric in layered nanoelectronic and nanophotonic heterostructures.
  • Harnessing artificial optical magnetism requires rather complex two- and three-dimensional structures, examples include split-ring and fishnet metamaterials and nanoparticles with non-trivial magnetic properties. By contrast, dielectric properties can be tailored even in planar and pattern-free, one-dimensional (1D) arrangements, for example metal/dielectric multilayer metamaterials. These systems are extensively investigated due to their hyperbolic and plasmonic response, which, however, is considered to be limited to TM polarization, based on the general consensus that they do not possess interesting magnetic properties. In this work, we tackle these two seemingly unrelated issues simultaneously, by proposing conceptually and demonstrating experimentally a mechanism for artificial magnetism in planar, 1D metamaterials. We show experimentally that the magnetic response of metal/high-index dielectric hyperbolic metamaterials can be anisotropic, leading to frequency regimes of magnetic hyperbolic dispersion. We investigate the implications of our results for TE polarization and show that such systems can support TE interface-bound states, analogous to their TM counterparts, surface plasmon polaritons. Our results simplify the structural complexity for tailoring artificial magnetism in lithography-free systems and generalize the concept of plasmonic and hyperbolic properties to encompass both TE and TM polarizations at optical frequencies.
  • Graphene nanostructures that support surface plasmons have been utilized to create a variety of dynamically tunable light modulators, motivated by theoretical predictions of the potential for unity absorption in resonantly-excited monolayer graphene sheets. Until now, the generally low efficiencies of tunable resonant graphene absorbers have been limited by the mismatch between free-space photons and graphene plasmons. Here, we develop nanophotonic structures that overcome this mismatch and demonstrate electronically tunable perfect absorption achieved with patterned graphenes covering less than 10% of the surface. Experimental measurements reveal 96.9% absorption in the graphene plasmonic nanostructure at 1,389 cm$^{-1}$, with an on/off modulation efficiency of 95.9% in reflection. An analytic effective surface admittance model elucidates the origin of perfect absorption, which is design for critical coupling between free-space modes and the graphene plasmonic nanostructures.
  • We demonstrate three-dimensional (3-D) nanoimprint lithography using master samples initially structured by two-photon lithography. Complex geometries like micro prisms, micro parabolic concentrators, micro lenses and other micrometer sized objects with nanoscale features are three-dimensionally fabricated using two-photon lithography. Stamps made out of polydimethylsiloxane are then cast using the two-photon lithographically structured samples as master samples. Hereby, expensive serial nano 3-D printing is transformed into scalable parallel 3-D nanoimprint lithography. Furthermore, the transition from two-photon lithography to imprint lithography increases the freedom in substrate and ink choice significantly. We demonstrate printing on textured surfaces as well as residue-free printing with silver ink using capillary action.
  • Metasurfaces offer significant potential to control far-field light propagation through the engineering of amplitude, polarization, and phase at an interface. We report here phase modulation of an electronically reconfigurable metasurface and demonstrate its utility for mid-infrared beam steering. Using a gate-tunable graphene-gold resonator geometry, we demonstrate highly tunable reflected phase at multiple wavelengths and show up to 237{\deg} phase modulation range at an operating wavelength of 8.50 {\mu}m. We observe a smooth monotonic modulation of phase with applied voltage from 0{\deg} to 206{\deg} at a wavelength of 8.70 {\mu}m. Based on these experimental data, we demonstrate with antenna array calculations an average beam steering efficiency of 50% for reflected light for angles up to 30{\deg}, relative to an ideal metasurface, confirming the suitability of this geometry for reconfigurable mid-infrared beam steering devices.
  • We report measurements of the infrared optical response of thin black phosphorus under field-effect modulation. We interpret the observed spectral changes as a combination of an ambipolar Burstein-Moss (BM) shift of the absorption edge due to band-filling under gate control, and a quantum confined Franz-Keldysh (QCFK) effect, phenomena which have been proposed theoretically to occur for black phosphorus under an applied electric field. Distinct optical responses are observed depending on the flake thickness and starting carrier concentration. Transmission extinction modulation amplitudes of more than two percent are observed, suggesting the potential for use of black phosphorus as an active material in mid-infrared optoelectronic modulator applications.
  • Ultrafast pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanostructures probe the non-equilibrium behavior of excited carriers, which involves several competing effects obscured in typical empirical analyses. Here we present pump-probe measurements of plasmonic nanoparticles along with a complete theoretical description based on first-principles calculations of carrier dynamics and optical response, free of any fitting parameters. We account for detailed electronic-structure effects in the density of states, excited carrier distributions, electron-phonon coupling, and dielectric functions which allow us to avoid effective electron temperature approximations. Using this calculation method, we obtain excellent quantitative agreement with spectral and temporal features in transient-absorption measurements. In both our experiments and calculations, we identify the two major contributions of the initial response with distinct signatures: short-lived highly non-thermal excited carriers and longer-lived thermalizing carriers.
  • We report mid-infrared spectroscopy measurements of an electrostatically gated topological insulator, in which we observe several percent modulation of transmittance and reflectance of (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films as gating shifts the Fermi level. Infrared transmittance measurements of gated (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 films were enabled by use of an epitaxial lift-off method for large-area transfer of topological insulator films from infrared-absorbing SrTiO3 growth substrates to thermal oxidized silicon substrates. We combine these optical experiments with transport measurements and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to identify the observed spectral modulation as a gate-driven transfer of spectral weight between both bulk and topological surface channels and interband and intraband channels. We develop a model for the complex permittivity of gated (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3, and find a good match to our experimental data. These results open the path for layered topological insulator materials as a new candidate for tunable infrared optics and highlight the possibility of switching topological optoelectronic phenomena between bulk and spin-polarized surface regimes.
  • We demonstrate near unity, broadband absorbing optoelectronic devices using sub-15 nm thick transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) of molybdenum and tungsten as van der Waals semiconductor active layers. Specifically, we report that near-unity light absorption is possible in extremely thin (< 15 nm) Van der Waals semiconductor structures by coupling to strongly damped optical modes of semiconductor/metal heterostructures. We further fabricate Schottky junction devices using these highly absorbing heterostructures and characterize their optoelectronic performance. Our work addresses one of the key criteria to enable TMDCs as potential candidates to achieve high optoelectronic efficiency.
  • Ultrafast laser measurements probe the non-equilibrium dynamics of excited electrons in metals with increasing temporal resolution. Electronic structure calculations can provide a detailed microscopic understanding of hot electron dynamics, but a parameter-free description of pump-probe measurements has not yet been possible, despite intensive research, because of the phenomenological treatment of electron-phonon interactions. We present ab initio predictions of the electron-temperature dependent heat capacities and electron-phonon coupling coefficients of plasmonic metals. We find substantial differences from free-electron and semi-empirical estimates, especially in noble metals above transient electron temperatures of 2000 K, because of the previously-neglected strong dependence of electron-phonon matrix elements on electron energy. We also present first-principles calculations of the electron-temperature dependent dielectric response of hot electrons in plasmonic metals, including direct interband and phonon-assisted intraband transitions, facilitating complete theoretical predictions of the time-resolved optical probe signatures in ultrafast laser experiments.
  • Photodetectors are typically based on photocurrent generation from electron-hole pairs in semiconductor structures and on bolometry for wavelengths that are below bandgap absorption. In both cases, resonant plasmonic and nanophotonic structures have been successfully used to enhance performance. In this work, we demonstrate subwavelength thermoelectric nanostructures designed for resonant spectrally selective absorption, which creates large enough localized temperature gradients to generate easily measureable thermoelectric voltages. We show that such structures are tunable and are capable of highly wavelength specific detection, with an input power responsivity of up to 119 V/W (referenced to incident illumination), and response times of nearly 3 kHz, by combining resonant absorption and thermoelectric junctions within a single structure, yielding a bandgap-independent photodetection mechanism. We report results for both resonant nanophotonic bismuth telluride-antimony telluride structures and chromel-alumel structures as examples of a broad class of nanophotonic thermoelectric structures useful for fast, low-cost and robust optoelectronic applications such as non-bandgap-limited hyperspectral and broad-band photodetectors.
  • A gyroid structure is a distinct morphology that is triply periodic and consists of minimal isosurfaces containing no straight lines. We have designed and synthesized amorphous silicon (a-Si) mid-infrared gyroid photonic crystals that exhibit a complete bandgap in infrared spectroscopy measurements. Photonic crystals were synthesized by deposition of a-Si/Al2O3 coatings onto a sacrificial polymer scaffold defined by two-photon lithography. We observed a 100% reflectance at 7.5 \mum for single gyroids with a unit cell size of 4.5 \mum, in agreement with the photonic bandgap position predicted from full-wave electromagnetic simulations, whereas the observed reflection peak shifted to 8 um for a 5.5 \mum unit cell size. This approach represents a simulation-fabrication-characterization platform to realize three-dimensional gyroid photonic crystals with well-defined dimensions in real space and tailored properties in momentum space.
  • Light trapping in planar ultrathin-film solar cells is limited due to a small number of optical modes available in the thin-film slab. A nanostructured thin-film design could surpass this limit by providing broadband increase in the local density of states in a subwavelength volume and maintaining efficient coupling of light. Here we report a broadband metasurface design, enabling efficient and broadband absorption enhancement by direct coupling of incoming light to resonant modes of subwavelength-scale Mie nanoresonators defined in the thin-film active layer. Absorption was investigated both theoretically and experimentally in prototypes consisting of lithographically patterned, two-dimensional periodic arrays of silicon nanoresonators on silica substrates. A crossed trapezoid resonator shape of rectangular cross section is used to excite broadband Mie resonances across the visible and near-IR spectra. Our numerical simulations, optical absorption measurements and photocurrent spectral response measurements demonstrate that crossed trapezoidal Mie resonant structures enable angle-insensitive, broadband absorption. A short circuit current density of 12.0 mA/cm2 is achieved in 210 nm thick patterned Si films, yielding a 4-fold increase compared to planar films of the same thickness. It is suggested that silicon metasurfaces with Mie resonator arrays can provide useful insights to guide future ultrathin-film solar cell designs incorporating nanostructured thin active layers.
  • Metasurfaces composed of planar arrays of sub-wavelength artificial structures show promise for extraordinary light manipulation; they have yielded novel ultrathin optical components such as flat lenses, wave plates, holographic surfaces and orbital angular momentum manipulation and detection over a broad range of electromagnetic spectrum. However the optical properties of metasurfaces developed to date do not allow for versatile tunability of reflected or transmitted wave amplitude and phase after fabrication, thus limiting their use in a wide range of applications. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a gate-tunable metasurface that enables dynamic electrical control of the phase and amplitude of the plane wave reflected from the metasurface. Tunability arises from field-effect modulation of the complex refractive index of conducting oxide layers incorporated into metasurface antenna elements which are configured in a reflectarray geometry. We measure a phase shift of {\pi} and ~ 30% change in the reflectance by applying 2.5 V gate bias. Additionally, we demonstrate modulation at frequencies exceeding 10 MHz, and electrical switching of +/-1 order diffracted beams by electrical control over subgroups of metasurface elements, a basic requirement for electrically tunable beam-steering phased array metasurfaces. The proposed tunable metasurface design with high optical quality and high speed dynamic phase modulation suggests applications in next generation ultrathin optical components for imaging and sensing technologies, such as reconfigurable beam steering devices, dynamic holograms, tunable ultrathin lens, nano-projectors, and nanoscale spatial light modulators. Importantly, our design allows complete integration with electronics and hence electrical addressability of individual metasurface elements.
  • We study cooperative behavior of quantum dipole emitters coupled to a rectangular waveguide with dielectric core and silver cladding. We investigate cooperative emission and inter-emitter entanglement generation phenomena for emitters whose resonant frequencies are near the frequency cutoff of the waveguide, where the waveguide effectively behaves as zero-index metamaterial. We show that coupling emitters to a zero-index waveguide allows one to relax the constraint on precision positioning of emitters for observing inter-emitter entanglement generation and extend the spatial scale at which the superradiance can be observed.
  • We demonstrate that use of the field effect to tune the effective optical parameters of a layered hyperbolic metamaterial leads to topological transitions in its dispersion characteristics in the optical regime. Field effect gating electrically modulates the permittivity in transparent conductive oxides via changes in the carrier density. These permittivity changes lead to active extreme modulation of ~200% of the effective electromagnetic parameters along with active control of the anisotropic dispersion surface of hyperbolic metamaterials and enable the opening and closing of photonic band gaps.
  • We present a general method for retrieving the effective tensorial permittivity of any uniaxially anisotropic metamaterial. By relaxing the usually imposed condition of non-magnetic metal/dielectric metamaterials, we also retrieve the permeability tensor and show that hyperbolic metamaterials exhibit a strong diamagnetic response in the visible regime. We obtain global material parameters, directly measurable with spectroscopic ellipsometry and distinguishable from mere wave parameters, by using the generalized dispersion equation for uniaxial crystals along with existing homogenization methods. Our method is analytically and experimentally verified for Ag/SiO2 planar metamaterials with varying number of layers and compared to the effective medium theory. We also propose an experimental method for retrieving material parameters using methods other than ellipsometry.