• We present spectroscopic observations of galaxies in the fields of 10 distant clusters for which we have previously presented deep imaging with WFPC2 on board the HST. The clusters span the redshift range z=0.37-0.56 and are the subject of a detailed ground- and space-based study to investigate the evolution of galaxies as a function of environment and epoch. The data presented here include positions, photometry, redshifts, spectral line strengths and classifications for 657 galaxies in the fields of the 10 clusters. The catalog comprises 424 cluster members across the 10 clusters and 233 field galaxies, with detailed morphological information from our WFPC2 images for 204 of the cluster galaxies and 71 in the field. We illustrate some basic properties of the catalog, including correlations between the morphological and spectral properties of our large sample of cluster galaxies. A direct comparison of the spectral properties of the high redshift cluster and field populations suggest that the phenomenon of strong Balmer lines in otherwise passive galaxies (commonly called E+A, but renamed here as the k+a class) shows an order-of-magnitude increase in the rich cluster environment, compared to a more modest increase in the field population. This suggests that the process or processes involved in producing k+a galaxies are either substantially more effective in the cluster environment or that this environment prolongs the visibility of this phase. A more detailed analysis and modeling of these data will be presented in Poggianti et al. (1998).
  • We present a detailed analysis of the spectroscopic catalog of galaxies in 10 distant clusters from Dressler et al. (1999, D99). We investigate the nature of the different spectral classes defined by D99 including star forming, post-starburst and passive galaxy populations, and reproduce their basic properties using our spectral synthesis model. We attempt to identify the evolutionary pathways between the various spectral classes in order to search for the progenitors of the numerous post-starburst galaxies. The comparison of the spectra of the distant galaxy populations with samples drawn from the local Universe leads us to identify a significant population of dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies, showing both strong Balmer absorption and relatively modest [OII] emission, that we believe are the most likely progenitors of the post-starburst population. We present the differences between the field and cluster galaxies at z=0.4-0.5. We then compare the spectral and the morphological properties of the distant cluster galaxies, exploring the connection between the quenching of star formation inferred from the spectra and the strong evolution of the S0 population discussed by Dressler et al. (1997). We conclude that either two different timescales and/or two different physical processes are responsible for the spectral and the morphological transformation.
  • Using traditional morphological classifications of galaxies in 10 intermediate-redshift (z~0.5) clusters observed with WFPC-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope, we derive relations between morphology and local galaxy density similar to that found by Dressler for low-redshift clusters. Taken collectively, the `morphology-density' relationship, M-D, for these more distant, presumably younger clusters is qualitatively similar to that found for the local sample, but a detailed comparison shows two substantial differences: (1) For the clusters in our sample, the M-D relation is strong in centrally concentrated ``regular'' clusters, those with a strong correlation of radius and surface density, but nearly absent for clusters that are less concentrated and irregular, in contrast to the situation for low redshift clusters where a strong relation has been found for both. (2) In every cluster the fraction of elliptical galaxies is as large or larger than in low-redshift clusters, but the S0 fraction is 2-3 times smaller, with a proportional increase of the spiral fraction. Straightforward, though probably not unique, interpretations of these observations are (1) morphological segregation proceeds hierarchically, affecting richer, denser groups of galaxies earlier, and (2) the formation of elliptical galaxies predates the formation of rich clusters, and occurs instead in the loose-group phase or even earlier, but S0's are generated in large numbers only after cluster virialization.
  • The small scatter observed for the U-V colors of spheroidal galaxies in nearby clusters of galaxies provides a powerful constraint on the history of star formation in dense environments. However, with local data alone, it is not possible to separate models where galaxies assembled synchronously over redshifts 0<z<1 from ones where galaxies formed stochastically at much earlier times. Here we attempt to resolve this ambiguity via high precision rest-frame UV-optical photometry of a large sample of morphologically-selected spheroidal galaxies in three z~0.54 clusters which have been observed with HST. We demonstrate the robustness of using HST to conduct the morphological separation of spheroidal and disk galaxies at this redshift and use our new data to repeat the analysis conducted locally at a significant look-back time. We find a small scatter (< 0.1 mag rms) for galaxies classed as Es and E/S0s, both internally within each of the three clusters and externally from cluster to cluster. We do not find any trend for the scatter to increase with decreasing luminosity down to L = L*+3, other than can be accounted for by observational error. Neither is there evidence for a distinction between the scatter observed for galaxies classified as ellipticals and S0. Our result provides a new constraint on the star formation history of cluster spheroidals prior to z=0.5 confirming and considerably strengthening the earlier conclusions. Most of the star formation in the elliptical galaxies in dense clusters was completed before z~3 in conventional cosmologies. Although we cannot rule out the continued production of some ellipticals, our results do indicate an era of initial star formation consistent with the population of star-forming galaxies recently detected beyond z~3.
  • We present catalogs of objects detected in deep images of 11 fields in 10 distant clusters obtained using WFPC-2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The clusters span the redshift range z=0.37-0.56 and are the subject of a detailed ground- and space-based study to investigate the evolution of galaxies as a function of environment and epoch. The data presented here include positions, photometry and basic morphological information on ~9000 objects in the fields of the 10 clusters. For a brighter subset of 1857 objects in these areas we provide more detailed morphological information.
  • We present weak lensing results for 12 distant clusters determined from images obtained with the refurbished HST. We detect the signature of gravitational lensing in 11 of the 12 clusters; the clusters span nearly an order of magnitude in lensing strength. The sample thus provides an excellent database for correlating direct mass estimates from lensing with indirect ones which rely on baryonic tracers. We examine the correlation between the cluster X-ray luminosities and the mean gravitational shear strengths and develop a model which predicts the relationship expected from the properties of local clusters. After allowing for various observational effects, we find that the predicted correlation is a reasonable match to the available data, indicating that there has been little evolution in the X-ray luminosity-central mass relationship between z=0.4 and now. We discuss the implications of this result in the context of the evolution of the X-ray luminosity function found by earlier workers. The comparison between shear amplitudes and velocity dispersions, estimated from a modest sample of members, reveals a discrepancy in the sense that these velocity dispersions are typically over-estimated by factors of ~50%. This supports earlier suggestions that high dispersions measured for distant clusters may be seriously affected by both unidentified substructure and outliers. Combining our lensing masses with morphologically-based luminosity estimates, we determine mass/light ratios in solar units of M/L_V=180+/-160 h for the entire population and 620+/-250 h for the spheroidal galaxies where the evolutionary effects can be best treated. We argue that this provides an upper bound to the local cluster M/L corresponding to Omega~0.4.