• We performed the new JVLA full polarization observations at 40-48 GHz (6.3-7.5 mm) towards the nearby ($d$ $=$147$\pm$3.4 pc) Class 0 YSO IRAS 16293-2422, and compare with the previous SMA observations reported by Rao et al. (2009; 2014). We observed the quasar J1407+2827 which is weakly polarized and can be used as a leakage term calibrator for $<$9 GHz observations, to gauge the potential residual polarization leakage after calibration. We did not detect Stokes Q, U, and V intensities from the observations of J1407+2827, and constrain (3-$\sigma$) the residual polarization leakage after calibration to be $\lesssim$0.3\%. We detect linear polarization from one of the two binary components of our target source, IRAS\,16293-2422\,B. The derived polarization position angles from our observations are in excellent agreement with those detected from the previous observations of the SMA, implying that on the spatial scale we are probing ($\sim$50-1000 au), the physical mechanisms for polarizing the continuum emission do not vary significantly over the wavelength range of $\sim$0.88-7.5 mm. We hypothesize that the observed polarization position angles trace the magnetic field which converges from large scale to an approximately face-on rotating accretion flow. In this scenario, magnetic field is predominantly poloidal on $>$100 au scales, and becomes toroidal on smaller scales. However, this interpretation remains uncertain due to the high dust optical depths at the central region of IRAS\,16293-2422\,B and the uncertain temperature profile. We suggest that dust polarization at wavelengths comparable or longer than 7\,mm may still trace interstellar magnetic field. Future sensitive observations of dust polarization in the fully optically thin regime will have paramount importance for unambiguously resolving the magnetic field configuration.
  • Filamentary structures are ubiquitous in high-mass star-forming molecular clouds. Their relation with high-mass star formation is still to be understood. Here we report interferometric observations toward 8 filamentary high-mass star-forming clouds. A total of 50 dense cores are identified in these clouds, most of which present signatures of high-mass star formation. Five of them are not associated with any star formation indicators, hence are prestellar core candidates. Evolutionary phases of these cores and their linewidths, temperatures, NH$_3$ abundances, and virial parameters are found to be correlated. In a sub-sample of 4 morphologically well-defined filaments, we find that their fragmentation can not be solely explained by thermal or turbulence pressure support. We also investigate distributions of gas temperatures and non-thermal motions along the filaments, and find a spatial correlation between non-thermal linewidths and star formation activities. We find evidence of gas flows along these filaments, and derive an accretion rate along filaments of $\sim$10$^{-4}$ M$_\odot$ yr$^{-1}$. These results suggest a strong relationship between massive filaments and high-mass star formation, through i) filamentary fragmentation in very early evolutionary phases to form dense cores, ii) accretion flows along filaments that are important for the growth of dense cores and protostars, and iii) enhancement of non-thermal motion in the filaments by the feedback or accretion during star formation.
  • Young stellar objects (YSOs) may undergo periods of active accretion (outbursts), during which the protostellar accretion rate is temporarily enhanced by a few orders of magnitude. Whether or not these accretion outburst YSOs possess similar dust/gas reservoirs to each other, and whether or not their dust/gas reservoirs are similar as quiescent YSOs, are issues not yet clarified. The aim of this work is to characterize the millimeter thermal dust emission properties of a statistically significant sample of long and short duration accretion outburst YSOs (i.e., FUors and EXors) and the spectroscopically identified candidates of accretion outbursting YSOs (i.e., FUor-like objects). We have carried out extensive Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations mostly at $\sim$225 GHz (1.33 mm) and $\sim$272 GHz (1.10 mm), from 2008 to 2017. We covered accretion outburst YSOs located at $<$1 kpc distances from the solar system. We analyze all the existing SMA data of such objects, both published and unpublished, in a coherent way to present a millimeter interferometric database of 29 objects. We obtained 21 detections at $>$3-$\sigma$ significance. Detected sources except for the two cases of V883 Ori and NGC 2071 MM3 were observed with $\sim$1$"$ angular resolution. Overall our observed targets show a systematically higher millimeter luminosity distribution than those of the $M_{*}>$0.3 $M_{\odot}$ Class II YSOs in the nearby ($\lesssim$400 pc) low-mass star-forming molecular clouds (e.g., Taurus, Lupus, Upp Scorpio, and Chameleon I). In addition, at 1 mm our observed confirmed binaries or triple-system sources are systematically fainter than the rest of the sources even though their 1 mm fluxes are broadly distributed. We may have detected $\sim$30-60\% millimeter flux variability from V2494 Cyg and V2495 Cyg, from the observations separated by $\sim$1 year.
  • The protoplanetary disk around HL Tau is so far the youngest candidate of planet formation, and it is still embedded in a protostellar envelope with a size of thousands of au. In this work, we study the gas kinematics in the envelope and its possible influence on the embedded disk. We present our new ALMA cycle 3 observational results of HL Tau in the 13CO (2-1) and C18O (2-1) emission at resolutions of 0.8" (110 au), and we compare the observed velocity pattern with models of different kinds of gas motions. Both the 13CO and C18O emission lines show a central compact component with a size of 2" (280 au), which traces the protoplanetary disk. The disk is clearly resolved and shows a Keplerian motion, from which the protostellar mass of HL Tau is estimated to be 1.8+/-0.3 M$_\odot$, assuming the inclination angle of the disk to be 47 deg from the plane of the sky. The 13CO emission shows two arc structures with sizes of 1000-2000 au and masses of 3E-3 M$_\odot$ connected to the central disk. One is blueshifted and stretches from the northeast to the northwest, and the other is redshifted and stretches from the southwest to the southeast. We find that simple kinematical models of infalling and (counter-)rotating flattened envelopes cannot fully explain the observed velocity patterns in the arc structures. The gas kinematics of the arc structures can be better explained with three-dimensional infalling or outflowing motions. Nevertheless, the observed velocity in the northwestern part of the blueshifted arc structure is ~60-70% higher than the expected free-fall velocity. We discuss two possible origins of the arc structures: (1) infalling flows externally compressed by an expanding shell driven by XZ Tau and (2) outflowing gas clumps caused by gravitational instabilities in the protoplanetary disk around HL Tau.
  • We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz towards the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern towards the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km/s, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with MHD simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (~0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V towards the higher-density hot core region (~0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.
  • We are motivated by the recent measurements of dust opacity indices beta around young stellar objects (YSOs), which suggest that efficient grain growth may have occurred earlier than the Class I stage. The present work makes use of abundant archival interferometric observations at submillimeter,millimeter, and centimeter wavelength bands to examine grain growth signatures in the dense inner regions (<1000 AU) of nine Class 0 YSOs. A systematic data analysis is performed to derive dust temperatures, optical depths, and dust opacity indices based on single-component modified black body fittings to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The fitted dust opacity indices (beta) are in a wide range of 0.3 to 2.0 when single-component SED fitting is adopted. Four out of the nine observed sources show beta lower than 1.7, the typical value of the interstellar dust. Low dust opacity index (or spectral index) values may be explained by the effect of dust grain growth, which makes beta<1.7. Alternatively, the very small observed values of beta may be interpreted by the presence of deeply embedded hot inner disks, which only significantly contribute to the observed fluxes at long wavelength bands. This possibility can be tested by the higher angular resolution imaging observations of ALMA, or more detailed sampling of SEDs in the millimeter and centimeter bands. The beta values of the remaining five sources are close to or consistent with 1.7, indicating that grain growth would start to significantly reduce the values of beta no earlier than the late-Class 0 stage for these YSOs.
  • We have modified the iterative procedure introduced by Lin et al. (2016), to systematically combine the submm images taken from ground based (e.g., CSO, JCMT, APEX) and space (e.g., Herschel, Planck) telescopes. We applied the updated procedure to observations of three well studied Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs): G11.11-0.12, G14.225-0.506 and G28.34+0.06, and then performed single-component, modified black-body fits to derive $\sim$10$"$ resolution dust temperature and column density maps. The derived column density maps show that these three IRDCs exhibit complex filamentary structures embedding with rich clumps/cores. We compared the column density probability distribution functions (N-PDFs) and two-point correlation (2PT) functions of the column density field between these IRDCs with several OB cluster-forming regions. Based on the observed correlation and measurements, and complementary hydrodynamical simulations for a 10$^{4}$ $\rm M_{\odot}$ molecular cloud, we hypothesize that cloud evolution can be better characterized by the evolution of the (column) density distribution function and the relative power of dense structures as a function of spatial scales, rather than merely based on the presence of star-forming activity. Based on the small analyzed sample, we propose four evolutionary stages, namely: {\it cloud integration, stellar assembly, cloud pre-dispersal and dispersed-cloud.} The initial {\it cloud integration} stage and the final {\it dispersed cloud} stage may be distinguished from the two intermediate stages by a steeper than $-$4 power-law index of the N-PDF. The {\it cloud integration} stage and the subsequent {\it stellar assembly} stage are further distinguished from each other by the larger luminosity-to-mass ratio ($>$40 $\rm L_{\odot}/M_{\odot}$) of the latter.
  • We recently reported a population of protostellar candidates in the 20 km s$^{-1}$ cloud in the Central Molecular Zone of the Milky Way, traced by H$_2$O masers in gravitationally bound dense cores. In this paper, we report high-angular-resolution ($\sim$3'') molecular line studies of the environment of star formation in this cloud. Maps of various molecular line transitions as well as the continuum at 1.3 mm are obtained using the Submillimeter Array. Five NH$_3$ inversion lines and the 1.3 cm continuum are observed with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The interferometric observations are complemented with single-dish data. We find that the CH$_3$OH, SO, and HNCO lines, which are usually shock tracers, are better correlated spatially with the compact dust emission from dense cores among the detected lines. These lines also show enhancement in intensities with respect to SiO intensities toward the compact dust emission, suggesting the presence of slow shocks or hot cores in these regions. We find gas temperatures of $\gtrsim$100 K at 0.1-pc scales based on RADEX modelling of the H$_2$CO and NH$_3$ lines. Although no strong correlations between temperatures and linewidths/H$_2$O maser luminosities are found, in high-angular-resolution maps we notice several candidate shock heated regions offset from any dense cores, as well as signatures of localized heating by protostars in several dense cores. Our findings suggest that at 0.1-pc scales in this cloud star formation and strong turbulence may together affect the chemistry and temperature of the molecular gas.
  • We report ALMA Cycle 2 observations of 230 GHz (1.3 mm) dust continuum emission, and $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O J = 2-1 line emission, from the Upper Scorpius transitional disk [PZ99] J160421.7-213028, with an angular resolution of ~0".25 (35 AU). Armed with these data and existing H-band scattered light observations, we measure the size and depth of the disk's central cavity, and the sharpness of its outer edge, in three components: sub-$\mu$m-sized "small" dust traced by scattered light, millimeter-sized "big" dust traced by the millimeter continuum, and gas traced by line emission. Both dust populations feature a cavity of radius $\sim$70 AU that is depleted by factors of at least 1000 relative to the dust density just outside. The millimeter continuum data are well explained by a cavity with a sharp edge. Scattered light observations can be fitted with a cavity in small dust that has either a sharp edge at 60 AU, or an edge that transitions smoothly over an annular width of 10 AU near 60 AU. In gas, the data are consistent with a cavity that is smaller, about 15 AU in radius, and whose surface density at 15 AU is $10^{3\pm1}$ times smaller than the surface density at 70 AU; the gas density grades smoothly between these two radii. The CO isotopologue observations rule out a sharp drop in gas surface density at 30 AU or a double-drop model as found by previous modeling. Future observations are needed to assess the nature of these gas and dust cavities, e.g., whether they are opened by multiple as-yet-unseen planets or photoevaporation.
  • We resolved FU Ori at 29-37 GHz using the JVLA with $\sim$0$''$.07 resolution, and performed the complementary JVLA 8-10 GHz observations, the SMA 224 GHz and 272 GHz observations, and compared with archival ALMA 346 GHz observations to obtain the SEDs. Our 8-10 GHz observations do not find evidence for the presence of thermal radio jets, and constrain the radio jet/wind flux to at least 90 times lower than the expected value from the previously reported bolometric luminosity-radio luminosity correlation. The emission at $>$29 GHz may be dominated by the two spatially unresolved sources, which are located immediately around FU Ori and its companion FU Ori S, respectively. Their deconvolved radii at 33 GHz are only a few au. The 8-346 GHz SEDs of FU Ori and FU Ori S cannot be fit by constant spectral indices (over frequency). The more sophisticated models for SEDs suggest that the $>$29 GHz emission is contributed by a combination of free-free emission from ionized gas, and thermal emission from optically thick and optically thin dust components. We hypothesize that dust in the innermost parts of the disks ($\lesssim$0.1 au) has been sublimated, and thus the disks are no more well shielded against the ionizing photons. The estimated overall gas and dust mass based on SED modeling, can be as high as a fraction of a solar mass, which is adequate for developing disk gravitational instability. Our present explanation for the observational data is that the massive inflow of gas and dust due to disk gravitational instability or interaction with a companion/intruder, was piled up at the few au scale due to the development of a deadzone with negligible ionization. The piled up material subsequently triggered the thermal and the MRI instabilities when the ionization fraction in the inner sub-au scale region exceeded a threshold value, leading to the high protostellar accretion rate.
  • We introduce a new stacking method in Keplerian disks that (1) enhances signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) of detected molecular lines and (2) that makes visible otherwise undetectable weak lines. Our technique takes advantage of the Keplerian rotational velocity pattern. It aligns spectra according to their different centroid velocities at their different positions in a disk and stacks them. After aligning, the signals are accumulated in a narrower velocity range as compared to the original line width without alignment. Moreover, originally correlated noise becomes de-correlated. Stacked and aligned spectra, thus, have a higher S/N. We apply our method to ALMA archival data of DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), N2D+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2), (3_2,2-2_2,1), and (3_2,1-2_2,0) in the protoplanetary disk around HD 163296. As a result, (1) the S/N of the originally detected DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), and H2CO (3_0,3-2_0,2) and N2D+ (3-2) lines are boosted by a factor of >4-5 at their spectral peaks, implying one order of magnitude shorter integration times to reach the original S/N; and (2) the previously undetectable spectra of the H2CO (3_2,2-2_2,1) and (3_2,1-2_2,0) lines are materialized at more than 3 sigma. These dramatically enhanced S/N allow us to measure intensity distributions in all lines with high significance. The principle of our method can not only be applied to Keplerian disks but also to any systems with ordered kinematic patterns.
  • Gravitational collapse of molecular cloud or cloud core/clump may lead to the formation of geometrically flattened, rotating accretion flow surrounding the new born star or star cluster. Gravitational instability may occur in such accretion flow when the gas to stellar mass ratio is high (e.g. over $\sim$10\%). This paper takes the OB cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4 as an example. We introduce the enclosed gas mass around its central ultra compact (UC) H\textsc{ii} region, addresses the gravitational stability of the accreting gas, and outline the observed potential signatures of gravitational instability. The position-velocity (PV) diagrams of various molecular gas tracers on G10.6-0.4 consistently show asymmetry in the spatial and the velocity domain. We deduce the morphology of the dense gas accretion flow by modeling velocity distribution of the azimuthally asymmetric gas structures, and by directly de-projecting the PV diagrams. We found that within the 0.3 pc radius, an infall velocity of 1-2 km\,s$^{-1}$ may be required to explain the observed PV diagrams. In addition, the velocity distribution traced in the PV diagrams can be interpreted by spiral arm-like structures, which may be connected with exterior infalling gas filaments. The morphology of dense gas structures we propose appears very similar to the spatially resolved gas structures around the OB cluster-forming region G33.92+0.11 with similar gas mass and size, which however is likely to be approximately in a face-on projection. The dense gas accretion flow around G10.6-0.4 appears to be Toomre unstable, which is consistent with the existence of large-scale spiral arm-like structures, and the formation of localize gas condensations.
  • We have developed an iterative procedure to systematically combine the millimeter and submillimeter images of OB cluster-forming molecular clouds, which were taken by ground based (CSO, JCMT, APEX, IRAM-30m) and space telescopes (Herschel, Planck). For the seven luminous ($L$$>$10$^{6}$ $L_{\odot}$) Galactic OB cluster-forming molecular clouds selected for our analyses, namely W49A, W43-Main, W43-South, W33, G10.6-0.4, G10.2-0.3, G10.3-0.1, we have performed single-component, modified black-body fits to each pixel of the combined (sub)millimeter images, and the Herschel PACS and SPIRE images at shorter wavelengths. The $\sim$10$"$ resolution dust column density and temperature maps of these sources revealed dramatically different morphologies, indicating very different modes of OB cluster-formation, or parent molecular cloud structures in different evolutionary stages. The molecular clouds W49A, W33, and G10.6-0.4 show centrally concentrated massive molecular clumps that are connected with approximately radially orientated molecular gas filaments. The W43-Main and W43-South molecular cloud complexes, which are located at the intersection of the Galactic near 3-kpc (or Scutum) arm and the Galactic bar, show a widely scattered distribution of dense molecular clumps/cores over the observed $\sim$10 pc spatial scale. The relatively evolved sources G10.2-0.3 and G10.3-0.1 appear to be affected by stellar feedback, and show a complicated cloud morphology embedded with abundant dense molecular clumps/cores. We find that with the high angular resolution we achieved, our visual classification of cloud morphology can be linked to the systematically derived statistical quantities (i.e., the enclosed mass profile, the column density probability distribution function, the two-point correlation function of column density, and the probability distribution function of clump/core separations).
  • We present new JVLA observations of the high-mass cluster-forming region W51A from 2 to 16 GHz with resolution ${\theta}_{fwhm} \approx$ 0.3 - 0.5". The data reveal a wealth of observational results: (1) Currently-forming, very massive (proto-O) stars are traced by o-H2CO $2_{1,1}-2_{1,2}$ emission, suggesting that this line can be used efficiently as a massive protostar tracer. (2) There is a spatially distributed population of $\sim$mJy continuum sources, including hypercompact H ii regions and candidate colliding wind binaries, in and around the W51 proto-clusters. (3) There are two clearly detected protoclusters, W51e and W51 IRS2, that are gas-rich but may have most of their mass in stars within their inner $\sim$ 0.05 pc. The majority of the bolometric luminosity in W51 most likely comes from a third population of OB stars between these clusters. The presence of a substantial population of exposed O-stars coincident with a population of still-forming massive stars, along with a direct measurement of the low mass loss rate via ionized gas outflow from W51 IRS2, together imply that feedback is ineffective at halting star formation in massive protoclusters. Instead, feedback may shut off the large-scale accretion of diffuse gas onto the W51 protoclusters, implying that they are evolving towards a state of gas exhaustion rather than gas expulsion. Recent theoretical models predict gas exhaustion to be a necessary step in the formation of gravitationally bound stellar clusters, and our results provide an observational validation of this process.
  • Our aim is to characterize the polarized continuum emission properties including intensity, polarization position angle, and polarization percentage of Sgr A* at $\sim$100 (3.0 mm), $\sim$230 (1.3 mm), $\sim$345 (0.87 mm), $\sim$500 (0.6 mm), and $\sim$700 GHz (0.43 mm). We report continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at the above frequency bands, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We measured flux densities of Sgr A* from ALMA single pointing and mosaic observations. We performed sinusoidal fittings to the observed (XX-YY)/I intensity ratios, to derive the polarization position angles and polarization percentages. We successfully detect polarized continuum emission from all observed frequency bands. We observed lower Stokes I intensity at $\sim$700 GHz than that at $\sim$500 GHz, which suggests that emission at $\gtrsim$500 GHz is from optically thin part of a synchrotron emission spectrum. Both the Stokes I intensity and the polarization position angle at our highest observing frequency of $\sim$700 GHz, may be varying with time. However, we do not yet detect variation in the polarization percentage at $>$500 GHz. The polarization percentage at $\sim$700 GHz is likely lower than that at $\sim$500 GHz. By comparing the $\sim$500 GHz and $\sim$700 GHz observations with the observations at lower frequency bands, we suggest that the intrinsic polarization position angle of Sgr A* is varying with time. This paper also reports the measurable polarization properties from the observed calibration quasars. The future simultaneous multi-frequency polarization observations are required for clarifying the time and frequency variation of polarization position angle and polarization percentage.
  • We report linearly polarized continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We used the observations of the likely unpolarized continuum emission of Titan, and the observations of C\textsc{i} line emission, to gauge the degree of spurious polarization. The Stokes I flux of 3.6$\pm$0.72 Jy during our run is consistent with extrapolations from the previous, lower frequency observations. We found that the continuum emission of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz shows large amplitude differences between the XX and the YY correlations. The observed intensity ratio between the XX and YY correlations as a function of parallactic angle may be explained by a constant polarization position angle of $\sim$158$^{\circ}$$\pm$3$^{\circ}$. The fitted polarization percentage of Sgr A* during our observational period is 14\%$\pm$1.2\%. The calibrator quasar J1744-3116 we observed at the same night can be fitted to Stokes I = 252 mJy, with 7.9\%$\pm$0.9\% polarization in position angle P.A. = 4.1$^{\circ}$$\pm$4.2$^{\circ}$. The observed polarization percentage and polarization position angle in the present work appear consistent with those expected from longer wavelength observations in the period of 1999-2005. In particular, the polarization position angle at 492 GHz, expected from the previously fitted 167$^{\circ}$$\pm$7$^{\circ}$ intrinsic polarization position angle and (-5.6$\pm$0.7)$\times$10$^{5}$ rotation measure, is 155$^{+9}_{-8}$, which is consistent with our new measurement of polarization position angle within 1$\sigma$. The polarization percentage and the polarization position angle may be varying over the period of our ALMA 12m Array observations, which demands further investigation with future polarization observations.
  • Protostellar (class 0/I) disks, having masses comparable to those of their nascent host stars, and fed continuously from their natal infalling envelopes, are prone to gravitational instability (GI). Motivated by advances in near-infrared (NIR) adaptive optics imaging and mm-wave interferometry, we explore the observational signatures of GI in disks, using hydrodynamical and Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations to synthesize NIR scattered light images and mm dust continuum maps. Spiral arms induced by GI, located at disk radii of hundreds of AUs, are local overdensities and have their photospheres displaced to higher altitudes above the disk midplane, arms therefore scatter more NIR light from their central stars than inter-arm regions, and are detectable at distances up to 1 kpc by Gemini/GPI, VLT/SPHERE, and Subaru/HiCIAO/SCExAO. By contrast, collapsed clumps formed by disk fragmentation have such strong local gravitational fields that their scattering photospheres are at lower altitudes, such fragments appear fainter than their surroundings in NIR scattered light. Spiral arms and streamers recently imaged in four FU Ori systems at NIR wavelengths resemble GI-induced structures and support the interpretation that FUors are gravitationally unstable protostellar disks. At mm wavelengths, both spirals and clumps appear brighter in thermal emission than the ambient disk and can be detected by ALMA at distances up to 0.4 kpc with one-hour integration times at ~0.1 arcsec resolution. Collapsed fragments having masses >=1 MJ can be detected by ALMA within ~10 minutes.
  • We present monitoring observations of the active T Tauri star RW Aur, from 2010 October to 2015 January, using optical high-resolution (R>10000) spectroscopy with CFHT-ESPaDOnS. Optical photometry in the literature shows bright, stable fluxes over most of this period, with lower fluxes (by 2-3 mag.) in 2010 and 2014. In the bright period our spectra show clear photospheric absorption, complicated variation in the Ca II 8542 A emission}profile shapes, and a large variation in redshifted absorption in the O I 7772 and 8446 A and He I 5876 A lines, suggesting unstable mass accretion during this period. In contrast, these line profiles are relatively uniform during the faint periods, suggesting stable mass accretion. During the faint periods the photospheric absorption lines are absent or marginal, and the averaged Li I profile shows redshifted absorption due to an inflow. We discuss (1) occultation by circumstellar material or a companion and (2) changes in the activity of mass accretion to explain the above results, together with near-infrared and X-ray observations from 2011-2015. Neither scenario can simply explain all the observed trends, and more theoretical work is needed to further investigate their feasibilities.
  • We have analyzed the HCO+ (1-0) data of the Class I-II protostar, HL Tau, obtained from the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array long baseline campaign. We generated the HCO+ image cube at an angular resolution of ~0.07 (~10 AU), and performed azimuthal averaging on the image cube to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio and measure the radial profile of the HCO+ integrated intensity. Two gaps at radii of ~28 AU and ~69 AU and a central cavity are identified in the radial intensity profile. The inner HCO+ gap is coincident with the millimeter continuum gap at a radius of 32 AU. The outer HCO+ gap is located at the millimeter continuum bright ring at a radius of 69 AU and overlaps with the two millimeter continuum gaps at radii of 64 AU and 74 AU. On the contrary, the presence of the central cavity is likely due to the high optical depth of the 3 mm continuum emission and not the depletion of the HCO+ gas. We derived the HCO+ column density profile from its intensity profile. From the column density profile, the full-width-half-maximum widths of the inner and outer HCO+ gaps are both estimated to be ~14 AU, and their depths are estimated to be ~2.4 and ~5.0. These results are consistent with the expectation from the gaps opened by forming (sub-)Jovian mass planets, while placing tight constraints on the theoretical models solely incorporating the variation of dust properties and grain sizes.
  • Young stellar objects (YSOs) may not accumulate their mass steadily, as was previously thought, but in a series of violent events manifesting themselves as sharp stellar brightening. These events can be caused by fragmentation due to gravitational instabilities in massive gaseous disks surrounding young stars, followed by migration of dense gaseous clumps onto the star. We report our high angular resolution, coronagraphic near-infrared polarization imaging observations using the High Contrast Instrument for the Subaru Next Generation Adaptive Optics (HiCIAO) of the Subaru 8.2 m Telescope, towards four YSOs which are undergoing luminous accretion outbursts. The obtained infrared images have verified the presence of several hundred AUs scale arms and arcs surrounding these YSOs. In addition, our hydrodynamics simulations and radiative transfer models further demonstrate that these observed structures can indeed be explained by strong gravitational instabilities occurring at the beginning of the disk formation phase. The effect of those tempestuous episodes of disk evolution on star and planet formation remains to be understood.
  • We report new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), 0$"$.5 angular resolution observations of linearly polarized continuum emission at 6.9 mm, towards the Class 0 young stellar object (YSO) NGC1333 IRAS4A. This target source is a collapsing dense molecular core, which was resolved at short wavelengths to have hourglass shaped B-field configuration. We compare these 6.9 mm observations with previous polarization Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 0.88 mm, which have comparable angular resolution ($\sim$0$"$7). We found that at the same resolution, the observed polarization position angles at 6.9 mm are slightly deviated from those observed at 0.88 mm. Due to the lower optical depth of the emission at 6.9 mm, and the potential effect of dust grain growth, the new JVLA observations are likely probing B-field alignments in regions interior to those sampled by the previous polarization observations at higher frequencies. Our understanding can be improved by more sensitive observations, and observations for the more extended spatial scales.
  • We are performing a series of observations with ground-based telescopes toward Planck Galactic cold clumps (PGCCs) in the $\lambda$ Orionis complex in order to systematically investigate the effects of stellar feedback. In the particular case of PGCC G192.32-11.88, we discovered an extremely young Class 0 protostellar object (G192N) and a proto-brown dwarf candidate (G192S). G192N and G192S are located in a gravitationally bound bright-rimmed clump. The velocity and temperature gradients seen in line emission of CO isotopologues indicate that PGCC G192.32-11.88 is externally heated and compressed. G192N probably has the lowest bolometric luminosity ($\sim0.8$ L$_{\sun}$) and accretion rate (6.3$\times10^{-7}$ M$_{\sun}$~yr$^{-1}$) when compared with other young Class 0 sources (e.g. PACS Bright Red sources (PBRs)) in the Orion complex. It has slightly larger internal luminosity ($0.21\pm0.01$ L$_{\sun}$) and outflow velocity ($\sim$14 km~s$^{-1}$) than the predictions of first hydrostatic cores (FHSCs). G192N might be among the youngest Class 0 sources, which are slightly more evolved than a FHSC. Considering its low internal luminosity ($0.08\pm0.01$ L$_{\odot}$) and accretion rate (2.8$\times10^{-8}$ M$_{\sun}$~yr$^{-1}$), G192S is an ideal proto-brown dwarf candidate. The star formation efficiency ($\sim$0.3\%-0.4\%) and core formation efficiency ($\sim$1\%) in PGCC G192.32-11.88 are significantly smaller than in other giant molecular clouds or filaments, indicating that the star formation therein is greatly suppressed due to stellar feedback.
  • We report Submillimeter Array (SMA) 1.3 mm high angular resolution observations towards the four EXor type outbursting young stellar objects (YSOs) VY Tau, V1118 Ori, V1143 Ori, and NY Ori. The data mostly show low dust masses $M_{dust}$ in the associated circumstellar disks. Among the sources, NY Ori possesses a relatively massive disk with $M_{dust} \sim 9 \times 10^{-4}$ $M_{\odot}$. V1118 Ori has a marginal detection equivalent to $M_{dust} \sim 6 \times 10^{-5}$ $M_{\odot}$. V1143 Ori has a non-detection also equivalent to $M_{dust} < 6 \times 10^{-5}$ $M_{\odot}$. For the nearest source VY Tau, we get a surprising non-detection which provides a stringent upper limit $M_{dust} < 6 \times 10^{-6}$ $M_{\odot}$. We interpret our findings as suggesting that the gas and dust reservoirs that feed the short duration, repetitive optical outbursts seen in some EXors may be limited to the small scale, innermost region of their circumstellar disks. This hot dust may have escaped our detection limits. Follow-up, more sensitive millimeter observations are needed to improve our understanding of the triggering mechanisms of EXor type outbursts.
  • Ground-based observations at terahertz (THz) frequencies are a newly explorable area of astronomy for the next ten years. We discuss science cases for a first-generation 10-m class THz telescope, focusing on the Greenland Telescope as an example of such a facility. We propose science cases and provide quantitative estimates for each case. The largest advantage of ground-based THz telescopes is their higher angular resolution (~ 4 arcsec for a 10-m dish), as compared to space or airborne THz telescopes. Thus, high-resolution mapping is an important scientific argument. In particular, we can isolate zones of interest for Galactic and extragalactic star-forming regions. The THz windows are suitable for observations of high-excitation CO lines and [N II] 205 um lines, which are scientifically relevant tracers of star formation and stellar feedback. Those lines are the brightest lines in the THz windows, so that they are suitable for the initiation of ground-based THz observations. THz polarization of star-forming regions can also be explored since it traces the dust population contributing to the THz spectral peak. For survey-type observations, we focus on ``sub-THz'' extragalactic surveys, whose uniqueness is to detect galaxies at redshifts z ~ 1--2, where the dust emission per comoving volume is the largest in the history of the Universe. Finally we explore possibilities of flexible time scheduling, which enables us to monitor active galactic nuclei, and to target gamma-ray burst afterglows. For these objects, THz and submillimeter wavelength ranges have not yet been explored.
  • This paper discusses compelling science cases for a future long-baseline interferometer operating at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths, like the proposed Next Generation Vary Large Array (ngVLA). We report on the activities of the Cradle of Life science working group, which focused on the formation of low- and high-mass stars, the formation of planets and evolution of protoplanetary disks, the physical and compositional study of Solar System bodies, and the possible detection of radio signals from extraterrestrial civilizations. We propose 19 scientific projects based on the current specification of the ngVLA. Five of them are highlighted as possible Key Science Projects: (1) Resolving the density structure and dynamics of the youngest HII regions and high-mass protostellar jets, (2) Unveiling binary/multiple protostars at higher resolution, (3) Mapping planet formation regions in nearby disks on scales down to 1 AU, (4) Studying the formation of complex molecules, and (5) Deep atmospheric mapping of giant planets in the Solar System. For each of these projects, we discuss the scientific importance and feasibility. The results presented here should be considered as the beginning of a more in-depth analysis of the science enabled by such a facility, and are by no means complete or exhaustive.