• Bars are common galactic structures in the local universe that play an important role in the secular evolution of galaxies, including the Milky Way. In particular, the velocity distribution of individual stars in our galaxy is useful to shed light on stellar dynamics, and provides information complementary to that inferred from the integrated light of external galaxies. However, since a wide variety of models reproduce the distribution of velocity and the velocity dispersion observed in the Milky Way, we look for signatures of the bar on higher-order moments of the line-of-sight velocity ($V_{los}$) distribution. We make use of two different numerical simulations --one that has developed a bar and one that remains nearly axisymmetric-- to compare them with observations in the latest APOGEE data release (SDSS DR14). This comparison reveals three interesting structures that support the notion that the Milky Way is a barred galaxy. A high skewness region found at positive longitudes constrains the orientation angle of the bar, and is incompatible with the orientation of the bar at $\ell=0^\circ$ proposed in previous studies. We also analyse the $V_{los}$ distributions in three regions, and introduce the Hellinger distance to quantify the differences among them. Our results show a strong non-Gaussian distribution both in the data and in the barred model, confirming the qualitative conclusions drawn from the velocity maps. In contrast to earlier work, we conclude it is possible to infer the presence of the bar from the kurtosis distribution.
  • We present deep imaging of the most distant dwarf discovered by the Dark Energy Survey, Eridanus II (Eri II). Our Magellan/Megacam stellar photometry reaches $\sim$$3$ mag deeper than previous work, and allows us to confirm the presence of a stellar cluster whose position is consistent with Eri II's center. This makes Eri II, at $M_V=-7.1$, the least luminous galaxy known to host a (possibly central) cluster. The cluster is partially resolved, and at $M_V=-3.5$ it accounts for $\sim$$4\%$ of Eri II's luminosity. We derive updated structural parameters for Eri II, which has a half-light radius of $\sim$$280$ pc and is elongated ($\epsilon$$\sim$$0.48$), at a measured distance of $D$$\sim$$370$ kpc. The color-magnitude diagram displays a blue, extended horizontal branch, as well as a less populated red horizontal branch. A central concentration of stars brighter than the old main sequence turnoff hints at a possible intermediate-age ($\sim$$3$ Gyr) population; alternatively, these sources could be blue straggler stars. A deep Green Bank Telescope observation of Eri II reveals no associated atomic gas.
  • Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01<z<0.12$) post-starburst galaxies drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We detect CO in 17 (53%). Using CO as a tracer for molecular hydrogen, and a Galactic conversion factor, we obtain molecular gas masses of $M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for the 15 undetected galaxies range from $10^{7.7} M_\odot$ to $10^{9.7} M_\odot$, with the median more consistent with early-type galaxies than with star-forming galaxies. Upper limits on the post-starburst star formation rates (SFRs) are lower by $\sim10\times$ than for star-forming galaxies with the same $M(H_2)$. We also compare the molecular gas surface densities ($\Sigma_{\rm H_2}$) to upper limits on the SFR surface densities ($\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$), finding a significant offset, with lower $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ for a given $\Sigma_{\rm H_2}$ than is typical for star-forming galaxies. This offset from the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation suggests that post-starbursts have lower star formation efficiency, a low CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor characteristic of ULIRGs, and/or a bottom-heavy initial mass function, although uncertainties in the rate and distribution of current star formation remain.
  • Although the Planck Surveyor mission is optimized to map the cosmic microwave background anisotropies, it will also provide extremely valuable information on astrophysical phenomena. We review our present understanding of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds relevant to the mission and discuss on one side, Planck's impact on the study of their properties and, on the other side, to what extent foreground contamination may affect Planck's ability to accurately determine cosmological parameters. Planck's multifrequency surveys will be unique in their coverage of large areas of the sky (actually, of the full sky); this will extend by two or more orders of magnitude the flux density interval over which mm/sub-mm counts of extragalactic sources can be determined by instruments already available (like SCUBA) or planned for the next decade (like the LSA-MMA or the space mission FIRST), which go much deeper but over very limited areas. Planck will thus provide essential complementary information on the epoch-dependent luminosity functions. Bright radio sources will be studied over a poorly explored frequency range where spectral signatures, essential to understand the physical processes that are going on, show up. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, with its extremely rich information content, will be observed in the direction of a large number of rich clusters of Galaxies. Thanks again to its all sky coverage, Planck will provide unique information on the structure and on the emission properties of the interstellar medium in the Galaxy. At the same time, the foregrounds are unlikely to substantially limit Planck's ability to measure the cosmological signals. Even measurements of polarization of the primordial Cosmic Microwave background fluctuations appear to be feasible.