• We consider subregion complexity within the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. We rewrite the volume proposal, according to which the complexity of a reduced density matrix is given by the spacetime volume contained inside the associated Ryu-Takayanagi (RT) surface, in terms of an integral over the curvature. Using the Gauss-Bonnet theorem we evaluate this quantity for general entangling regions and temperature. In particular, we find that the discontinuity that occurs under a change in the RT surface is given by a fixed topological contribution, independent of the temperature or details of the entangling region. We offer a definition and interpretation of subregion complexity in the context of tensor networks, and show numerically that it reproduces the qualitative features of the holographic computation in the case of a random tensor network using its relation to the Ising model. Finally, we give a prescription for computing subregion complexity directly in CFT using the kinematic space formalism, and use it to reproduce some of our explicit gravity results obtained at zero temperature. We thus obtain a concrete matching of results for subregion complexity between the gravity and tensor network approaches, as well as a CFT prescription.
  • We investigate a dynamically adapting tuning scheme for microtonal tuning of musical instruments, allowing the performer to play music in just intonation in any key. Unlike other methods, which are based on a procedural analysis of the chordal structure, the tuning scheme continually solves a system of linear equations without making explicit decisions. In complex situations, where not all intervals of a chord can be tuned according to just frequency ratios, the method automatically yields a tempered compromise. We outline the implementation of the algorithm in an open-source software project that we have provided in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the tuning method.
  • For a bipartite quantum system consisting of subsystems A and B it was shown by Zhang et al. (Physics Letters A 376 (2012) 3588-3592) that the amount of classical correlations, which is used to define the quantum discord, is known to be bounded from above by the minimum of the von Neumann entropies of the subsystems A and B. We provide an alternative proof that is shorter and more transparent as it works without defining correlation matrices.
  • In this paper we study the one-dimensional Kardar-Parisi-Zhang equation (KPZ) with correlated noise by field-theoretic dynamic renormalization group techniques (DRG). We focus on spatially correlated noise where the correlations are characterized by a "sinc"-profile in Fourier-space with a certain correlation length $\xi$. The influence of this correlation length on the dynamics of the KPZ equation is analyzed. It is found that its large-scale behavior is controlled by the "standard" KPZ fixed point, i.e. in this limit the KPZ system forced by "sinc"-noise with arbitrarily large but finite correlation length $\xi$ behaves as if it were excited with pure white noise. A similar result has been found by Mathey et al. [Phys.Rev.E 95, 032117] in 2017 for a spatial noise correlation of Gaussian type ($\sim e^{-x^2/(2\xi^2)}$), using a different method. These two findings together suggest that the KPZ dynamics is universal with respect to the exact noise structure, provided the noise correlation length $\xi$ is finite.
  • Based on the algebraic theory of signal processing, we recursively decompose the discrete sine transform of first kind (DST-I) into small orthogonal block operations. Using a diagrammatic language, we then second-quantize this decomposition to construct a tensor network implementing the DST-I for fermionic modes on a lattice. The complexity of the resulting network is shown to scale as $\frac 54 n \log n$ (not considering swap gates), where $n$ is the number of lattice sites. Our method provides a systematic approach of generalizing Ferris' spectral tensor network for non-trivial boundary conditions.
  • We study the dynamics of an initially thermalized spin chain in the quantum XY-model, after sudden coupling to a heat bath of lower temperature at one end of the chain. In the semi-classical limit we see an exponential decay of the system-bath heatflux by exact solution of the reduced dynamics. In the full quantum description however, we numerically find the heatflux to reach intermediate plateaus where it is approximately constant -- a phenomenon that we attribute to the finite speed of heat transport via spin waves.
  • Self-similar dynamical processes are characterized by a growing length scale $\xi$ which increases with time as $\xi \sim t^{1/z}$, where z is the dynamical exponent. The best known example is a simple random walk with z=2. Usually such processes are assumed to take place on a static background. In this paper we address the question what changes if the background itself evolves dynamically. As an example we consider a random walk on an isotropically and homogeneously inflating space. For an exponentially fast expansion it turns out that the self-similar properties of the random walk are destroyed. For an inflation with power-law characteristics, however, self-similarity is preserved provided that the exponent controlling the growth is small enough. The resulting probability distribution is analyzed in terms of cumulant ratios. Moreover, the dynamical exponent z is found to change continuously with the control exponent.
  • Western music is predominantly based on the equal temperament with a constant semitone frequency ratio of $2^{1/12}$. Although this temperament has been in use since the 19th century and in spite of its high degree of symmetry, various musicians have repeatedly expressed their discomfort with the harmonicity of certain intervals. Recently it was suggested that this problem can be overcome by introducing a modified temperament with a constant but slightly increased frequency ratio. In this paper we confirm this conjecture quantitatively. Using entropy as a measure for harmonicity, we show numerically that the harmonic optimum is in fact obtained for frequency ratios larger than $2^{1/12}$. This suggests that the equal temperament should be replaced by a harmonized temperament as a new standard.
  • The temporal evolution of the entanglement between two qubits evolving by random interactions is studied analytically and numerically. Two different types of randomness are investigated. Firstly we analyze an ensemble of systems with randomly chosen but time-independent interaction Hamiltonians. Secondly we consider the case of a temporally fluctuating Hamiltonian, where the unitary evolution can be understood as a random walk on the SU (4) group manifold. As a by-product we compute the metric tensor and its inverse as well as the Laplace-Beltrami for SU (4).
  • In this paper we discuss the meaning of the Schnakenberg formula for entropy production in non-equilibrium systems. To this end we consider a non-equilibrium system as part of a larger isolated system which includes the environment. We prove that the Schnakenberg formula provides only a lower bound to the actual entropy production in the environment. This is also demonstrated in the simplest example of a three-state clock model.
  • The synchronization properties of two self-sustained quantum oscillators are studied in the Wigner representation. Instead of considering the quantum limit of the quantum van-der-Pol master equation we derive the quantum master equation directly from a suitable Hamiltonian. Moreover, the oscillators are coupled in incorporating an additional phase factor which shows up in the mutual correlations.
  • We study a two-level system controlled in a discrete feedback loop, modeling both the system and the controller in terms of stochastic Markov processes. We find that the extracted work, which is known to be bounded from above by the mutual information acquired during measurement, has to be compensated by an additional energy supply during the measurement process itself, which is bounded by the same mutual information from below. Our results confirm that the total cost of operating an information engine is in full agreement with the conventional second law of thermodynamics. We also consider the efficiency of the information engine as function of the cycle time and discuss the operating condition for maximal power generation. Moreover, we find that the entropy production of our information engine is maximal for maximal efficiency, in sharp contrast to conventional reversible heat engines.
  • The framework of generalized probabilistic theories is a powerful tool for studying the foundations of quantum physics. It provides the basis for a variety of recent findings that significantly improve our understanding of the rich physical structure of quantum theory. This review paper tries to present the framework and recent results to a broader readership in an accessible manner. To achieve this, we follow a constructive approach. Starting from few basic physically motivated assumptions we show how a given set of observations can be manifested in an operational theory. Furthermore, we characterize consistency conditions limiting the range of possible extensions. In this framework classical and quantum theory appear as special cases, and the aim is to understand what distinguishes quantum mechanics as the fundamental theory realized in nature. It turns out non-classical features of single systems can equivalently result from higher dimensional classical theories that have been restricted. Entanglement and non-locality, however, are shown to be genuine non-classical features.
  • We propose an alternative method to compute the entropy production of a classical underdamped nonequilibrium system in a continuous phase space. This approach has the advantage that it is not necessary to distinguish between even and odd-parity variables. We show that the method leads to the same local entropy production as in previous studies while the differential entropy production along a stochastic trajectory turns out to be different. This demonstrates that the differential entropy production in continuous phase space systems is not uniquely defined.
  • We study a non-conserved one-dimensional stochastic process which involves two species of particles $A$ and $B$. The particles diffuse asymmetrically and react in pairs as $A\emptyset\leftrightarrow AA\leftrightarrow BA \leftrightarrow A\emptyset$ and $B\emptyset \leftrightarrow BB \leftrightarrow AB \leftrightarrow B\emptyset$. We show that the stationary state of the model can be calculated exactly by using matrix product techniques. The model exhibits a phase transition at a particular point in the phase diagram which can be related to a condensation transition in a particular zero-range process. We determine the corresponding critical exponents and provide a heuristic explanation for the unusually strong corrections to scaling seen in the vicinity of the critical point.
  • We introduce a finite-time detailed fluctuation theorem for the environmental entropy of the form $\tilde P(\Delta S_{env}) = e^{\Delta S_{env}} \tilde P(-\Delta S_{env})$ for an appropriately weighted probability density of the external entropy production in the environment. The fluctuation theorem is valid for nonequilibrium systems with constant rates starting with an arbitrary initial probability distribution. We discuss the implication of this new relation for the case of a temperature quench in classical equilibrium systems. The fluctuation theorem is tested numerically for a Markov jump process with six states and for a surface growth model.
  • A two-dimensional easy-plane ferromagnetic substrate, interacting with a dipolar tip which is magnetised perpendicular with respect to the easy plane is studied numerically by solving the Landau-Lifshitz Gilbert equation. Due to the symmetry of the dipolar field of the tip, in addition to the collinear structure a magnetic vortex structure becomes stable. It is robust against excitations caused by the motion of the tip. We show that for high excitations the system may perform a transition between the two states. The influence of domain walls, which may also induce this transition, is examined.
  • In statistical physics entropy is usually introduced as a global quantity which expresses the amount of information that would be needed to specify the microscopic configuration of a system. However, for lattice models with infinitely many possible configurations per lattice site it is also meaningful to introduce entropy as a local observable that describes the information content of a single lattice site. Likewise, the mutual information can be interpreted as a two-point correlation function. Studying a particular growth model we demonstrate that the mutual information exhibits scaling properties that are consistent with the established phenomenological scaling picture.
  • In nature stationary nonequilibrium systems cannot exist on their own, rather they need to be driven from outside in order to keep them away from equilibrium. While the internal mean entropy of such stationary systems is constant, the external drive will on average increase the entropy in the environment. This external entropy production is usually quantified by a simple formula, stating that each microscopic transition of the system between two configurations $c \to c'$ with rate $w_{c\to c'}$ changes the entropy in the environment by $\Delta S_{\rm env} = {\ln w_{c \to c'}}-{\ln w_{c' \to c}}$. According to this formula irreversible transitions $c \to c'$ with a vanishing backward rate $w_{c'\to c}=0$ would produce an infinite amount of entropy. However, in experiments designed to mimic such processes, a divergent entropy production, that would cause an infinite increase of heat in the environment, is not seen. The reason is that in an experimental realization the backward process can be suppressed but its rate always remains slightly positive, resulting in a finite entropy production. The paper discusses how this entropy production can be estimated and specifies a lower bound depending on the observation time.
  • The quantum entanglement $E$ of a bipartite quantum Ising chain is compared with the mutual information $I$ between the two parts after a local measurement of the classical spin configuration. As the model is conformally invariant, the entanglement measured in its ground state at the critical point is known to obey a certain scaling form. Surprisingly, the mutual information of classical spin configurations is found to obey the same scaling form, although with a different prefactor. Moreover, we find that mutual information and the entanglement obey the inequality $I\leq E$ in the ground state as well as in a dynamically evolving situation. This inequality holds for general bipartite systems in a pure state and can be proven using similar techniques as for Holevo's bound.
  • We study a two-dimensional kinetic Ising model with Swendsen-Wang dynamics, replacing the usual percolation on top of Ising clusters by explosive percolation. The model exhibits a reversible first-order phase transition with hysteresis. Surprisingly, at the transition flanks the global bond density seems to be equal to the percolation thresholds.
  • Fixed-energy sandpiles with stochastic update rules are known to exhibit a nonequilibrium phase transition from an active phase into infinitely many absorbing states. Examples include the conserved Manna model, the conserved lattice gas, and the conserved threshold transfer process. It is believed that the transitions in these models belong to an autonomous universality class of nonequilibrium phase transitions, the so-called Manna class. Contrarily, the present numerical study of selected (1+1)-dimensional models in this class suggests that their critical behavior converges to directed percolation after very long time, questioning the existence of an independent Manna class.
  • The human sense of hearing perceives a combination of sounds 'in tune' if the corresponding harmonic spectra are correlated, meaning that the neuronal excitation pattern in the inner ear exhibits some kind of order. Based on this observation it is suggested that musical instruments such as pianos can be tuned by minimizing the Shannon entropy of suitably preprocessed Fourier spectra. This method reproduces not only the correct stretch curve but also similar pitch fluctuations as in the case of high-quality aural tuning.
  • We study the entropy production of a microscopic model for nonequilibrium wetting. We show that, in contrast to the equilibrium case, a bound interface in a nonequilibrium steady state produces entropy. Interestingly, in some regions of the phase diagram a bound interface produces more entropy than a free interface. Moreover, by solving exactly a four-site system, we find that the first derivative of the entropy production with respect to the control parameter displays a discontinuity at the critical point of the wetting transition.
  • We investigate a new symmetry of the large deviation function of certain time-integrated currents in non-equilibrium systems. The symmetry is similar to the well-known Gallavotti-Cohen-Evans-Morriss-symmetry for the entropy production, but it concerns a different functional of the stochatic trajectory. The symmetry can be found in a restricted class of Markov jump processes, where the network of microscopic transitions has a particular structure and the transition rates satisfy certain constraints. We provide three physical examples, where time-integrated observables display such a symmetry. Moreover, we argue that the origin of the symmetry can be traced back to time-reversal if stochastic trajectories are grouped appropriately.