• The rate at which massive stars eject mass in stellar winds significantly influences their evolutionary path. Cosmic rates of nucleosynthesis, explosive stellar phenomena, and compact object genesis depend on this poorly known facet of stellar evolution. We employ an unexploited observational technique for measuring the mass-loss rates of O- and early-B stars. Our approach, which has no adjustable parameters, uses the principle of pressure equilibrium between the stellar wind and the ambient interstellar medium for a high-velocity star generating an infrared bowshock nebula. Results for twenty bowshock-generating stars show good agreement with two sets of theoretical predictions for O5--O9.5 main-sequence stars, yielding $\dot M=$1.3$\times$10$^{-6}$ to 2$\times$10$^{-9}$ solar masses per year. Although $\dot M$ values derived for this sample are smaller than theoretical expectations by a factor of about two, this discrepancy is greatly reduced compared to canonical mass-loss methods. Bowshock-derived mass-loss rates are factors of ten smaller than H$\alpha$-based measurements (uncorrected for clumping) for similar stellar types and are nearly an order of magnitude larger than P$^{4+}$ and some other UV absorption-line-based diagnostics. Ambient interstellar densities of at least several cm$^{-3}$ appear to be required for formation of a prominent infrared bowshock nebula. $\dot M$ measurements for early-B stars are not yet compelling owing to the small number in our sample and the lack of clear theoretical predictions in the regime of lower stellar luminosities. These results may constitute a partial resolution of the extant "weak-wind problem" for late-O stars. The technique shows promise for determining mass-loss rates in the weak-wind regime.
  • We present the first identification of a candidate precursor for an imminent red nova. Our prediction is based on the example of the precursor to the red nova V1309 Sco, which was retrospectively found to be a contact binary with an exponentially decreasing period. We explore the use of this distinctive timing signature to identify precursors, developing the observational and analysis steps needed. We estimate that our Galaxy has roughly 1-10 observable precursors. Specifically, we lay out the observational case for KIC 9832227, which we identified as a tentative candidate two years ago (Molnar et al. 2015, AAS Meeting Abstracts 415.05). Orbital timing over the past two years has followed the tentative exponential fit. As of late 2015, the period time derivative went beyond the range found in other systems (dP/dt < 1x10^{-8}), a necessary criterion for a serious candidate. We estimate time of merger is the year 2022.2(7). Double absorption line spectra confirm directly the 0.458 d light curve period is a contact binary system and yield a mass ratio m_B/m_A = 0.228(3). Closer analysis of the Kepler timing data shows evidence of a component C with orbital period P_C = 590(8) days and m_C x sin i_C = 0.11 solar masses. An alternative interpretation of the long term timing trend, light travel time delay due to orbit around a distant component D, is ruled out by the spectroscopic data for any nondegenerate star. Additional measurements are needed to test further the merging hypothesis and to utilize fully this fortuitous opportunity.
  • We identify 709 arc-shaped mid-infrared nebula in 24 micron Spitzer Space Telescope or 22 micron Wide Field Infrared Explorer surveys of the Galactic Plane as probable dusty interstellar bowshocks powered by early-type stars. About 20% are visible at 8 microns or shorter mid-infrared wavelengths as well. The vast majority (660) have no previous identification in the literature. These extended infrared sources are strongly concentrated near Galactic mid-Plane with an angular scale height of ~0.6 degrees. All host a symmetrically placed star implicated as the source of a stellar wind sweeping up interstellar material. These are candidate "runaway" stars potentially having high velocities in the reference frame of the local medium. Among the 286 objects with measured proper motions, we find an unambiguous excess having velocity vectors aligned with the infrared morphology --- kinematic evidence that many of these are "runaway" stars with large peculiar motions responsible for the bowshock signature. We discuss a population of "in-situ" bowshocks (103 objects) that face giant HII regions where the relative motions between the star and ISM may be caused by bulk outflows from an overpressured bubble. We also identify 58 objects that face 8 micron bright-rimmed clouds and apparently constitute a sub-class of in-situ bowshocks where the stellar wind interacts with a photo-evaporative flow from an eroding molecular cloud interface (i.e., "PEF bowshocks"). Orientations of the arcuate nebulae exhibit a correlation over small angular scales, indicating that external influences such as HII regions are responsible for producing some bowshock nebulae. However, the vast majority of this sample appear to be isolated (499 objects) from obvious external influences.
  • We have implemented upgrades to the University of Wyoming's Red Buttes Observatory (RBO) to allow remote and autonomous operations using the 0.6 m telescope. Detailed descriptions of hardware and software components provide sufficient information to guide upgrading similarly designed telescopes. We also give a thorough description of the automated and remote operation modes with intent to inform the construction of routines elsewhere. Because the upgrades were largely driven by the intent to perform exoplanet transit photometry, we discuss how this science informed the automation process. A sample exoplanet transit observation serves to demonstrate RBO's capability to perform precision photometry. The successful upgrades have equipped a legacy observatory for a new generation of automated and rapid-response observations.
  • Upgrades at the 2.3 meter Wyoming Infrared Observatory telescope have provided the capability for fully-remote operations by a single operator from the University of Wyoming campus. A line-of-sight 300 Megabit/s 11 GHz radio link provides high-speed internet for data transfer and remote operations that include several real-time video feeds. Uninterruptable power is ensured by a 10 kVA battery supply for critical systems and a 55 kW autostart diesel generator capable of running the entire observatory for up to a week. Construction of a new four-element prime-focus corrector with fused-silica elements allows imaging over a 40' field-of-view with a new 4096x4096 UV-sensitive prime-focus camera and filter wheel. A new telescope control system facilitates the remote operations model and provides 20'' rms pointing over the usable sky. Taken together, these improvements pave the way for a new generation of sky surveys supporting space-based missions and flexible-cadence observations advancing emerging astrophysical priorities such as planet detection, quasar variability, and long-term time-domain campaigns.
  • New deep optical and near-infrared imaging is combined with archival ultraviolet and infrared data for fifteen nearby galaxies mapped in the Spitzer Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These images are particularly deep and thus excellent for studying the low surface brightness outskirts of these disk-dominated galaxies with stellar masses ranging between 10^8 and 10^11 Msun. The spectral energy distributions derived from this dataset are modeled to investigate the radial variations in the galaxy colors and star formation histories. Taken as a whole, the sample shows bluer and younger stars for larger radii until reversing near the optical radius, whereafter the trend is for redder and older stars for larger galacto-centric distances. These results are consistent with an inside-out disk formation scenario coupled with an old stellar outer disk population formed through radial migration and/or the cumulative history of minor mergers and accretions of satellite dwarf galaxies. However, these trends are quite modest and the variation from galaxy to galaxy is substantial. Additional data for a larger sample of galaxies are needed to confirm or dismiss these modest sample-wide trends.
  • The Cygnus OB2 Association is one of the nearest and largest collections of massive stars in the Galaxy. Situated at the heart of the "Cygnus X" complex of star-forming regions and molecular clouds, its distance has proven elusive owing to the ambiguous nature of kinematic distances along this $\ell\simeq80$ degree sightline and the heavy, patchy extinction. In an effort to refine the three-dimensional geometry of key Cygnus~X constituents, we have measured distances to four eclipsing double-lined OB-type spectroscopic binaries that are probable members of Cyg~OB2. We find distances of $1.33\pm0.17$, $1.32\pm0.07$, $1.44\pm0.18$, and $1.32\pm0.13$ kpc toward MT91~372, MT91~696, CPR2002~A36, and Schulte~3 respectively. We adopt a weighted average distance of 1.33$\pm$0.06~kpc. This agrees well with spectrophotometric estimates for the Association as a whole and with parallax measurements of protostellar masers in the surrounding interstellar clouds, thereby linking the ongoing star formation in these clouds with Cyg~OB2. We also identify Schulte 3C (O9.5V), a 4" visual companion to the 4.75 day binary Schulte~3(A+B), as a previously unrecognized Association member.
  • We present multi-epoch spectroscopy of "heartbeat stars," eccentric binaries with dynamic tidal distortions and tidally induced pulsations originally discovered with the Kepler satellite. Optical spectra of six known heartbeat stars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory 2.3 m telescope allow measurement of stellar effective temperatures and radial velocities from which we determine orbital parameters including the periods, eccentricities, approximate mass ratios, and component masses. These spectroscopic solutions confirm that the stars are members of eccentric binary systems with eccentricities e>0.34 and periods P=7-20 days, strengthening conclusions from prior works which utilized purely photometric methods. Heartbeat stars in this sample have A- or F-type primary components. Constraints on orbital inclinations indicate that four of the six systems have minimum mass ratios q=0.3-0.5, implying that most secondaries are probable M dwarfs or earlier. One system is an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary with roughly equal-mass mid-A components (q=0.95), while another shows double-lined behavior only near periastron, indicating that the F0V primary has a G1V secondary (q=0.65). This work constitutes the first measurements of the masses of secondaries in a statistical sample of heartbeat stars. The good agreement between our spectroscopic orbital elements and those derived using a photometric model support the idea that photometric data are sufficient to derive reliable orbital parameters for heartbeat stars.
  • We analyze orbital solutions for 48 massive multiple-star systems in the Cygnus OB2 Association, 23 of which are newly presented here, to find that the observed distribution of orbital periods is approximately uniform in log P for P<45 d, but it is not scale-free. Inflections in the cumulative distribution near 6 d, 14, d, and 45 d, suggest key physical scales of ~0.2, ~0.4, and ~1 A.U. where yet-to-be-identified phenomena create distinct features. No single power law provides a statistically compelling prescription, but if features are ignored, a power law with exponent beta = -0.22 provides a crude approximation over P=1.4 -- 2000 d, as does a piece-wise linear function with a break near 45 d. The cumulative period distribution flattens at P > 45 d, even after correction for completeness, indicating either a lower binary fraction or a shift toward low-mass companions. A high degree of similarity (91% likelihood) between the Cyg OB2 period distribution and that of other surveys suggests that the binary properties at P<25 d are determined by local physics of disk/clump fragmentation and are relatively insensitive to environmental and evolutionary factors. Fully 30% of the unbiased parent sample is a binary with period P < 45 d. Completeness corrections imply a binary fraction near 55% for P < 5000 d. The observed distribution of mass ratios 0.2<q<1 is consistent with uniform, while the observed distribution of eccentricities 0.1<e<0.6 is consistent with uniform plus an excess of e ~ 0 systems. We identify six stars, all supergiants, that exhibit aperiodic velocity variations of ~30 km/s attributed to atmospheric fluctuations.
  • We present an all-sky sample of 984 candidate intermediate-mass Galactic star-forming regions color-selected from the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) Point Source Catalog and morphologically classify each object using mid-infrared Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) images. Of the 984 candidates, 616 are probable star-forming regions (62.6%), 128 are filamentary structures (13.0%), 39 are point-like objects of unknown nature (4.0%), and 201 are galaxies (20.4%). We conduct a study of four of these regions, IRAS 00259+5625, IRAS 00420+5530, IRAS 01080+5717, and IRAS 05380+2020, at Galactic latitudes |b| > 5 degrees using optical spectroscopy from the Wyoming Infrared Observatory along with near-infrared photometry from the Two-Micron All Sky Survey to investigate their stellar content. New optical spectra, color-magnitude diagrams, and color-color diagrams reveal their extinctions, spectrophotometric distances, and the presence of small stellar clusters containing 20-78 solar masses of stars. These low-mass diffuse star clusters contain 65-250 stars for a typical initial mass function, including one or more mid-B stars as their most massive constituents. Using infrared spectral energy distributions we identify young stellar objects near each region and assign probable masses and evolutionary stages to the protostars. The total infrared luminosity lies in the range 190 to 960 solar luminosities, consistent with the sum of the luminosities of the individually identified young stellar objects.
  • We present a study of the star formation (SF) region G38.9-0.4 using publicly available multiwavelength Galactic Plane surveys from ground- and space-based observatories. This region is composed of four bright mid-IR bubbles and numerous infrared dark clouds. Two bubbles, N 74 and N 75, each host a star cluster anchored by a single O9.5V star. We identified 162 young stellar objects (YSOs) and classify 54 as stage I, 7 stage II, 6 stage III, and 32 ambiguous. We do not detect the classical signposts of triggered SF, i.e., star-forming pillars or YSOs embedded within bubble rims. We conclude that feedback-triggered SF has not occurred in G38.9-0.4. The YSOs are preferentially coincident with infrared dark clouds. This leads to a strong correlation between areal YSO mass surface density and gas mass surface density with a power law slope near 1.3, which closely matches the Schmidt-Kennicutt Law. The correlation is similar inside and outside the bubbles and may mean that the SF efficiency is neither enhanced nor supressed in regions potentially influenced by stellar feedback. This suggests that gas density, regardless of how it is collected, is a more important driver of SF than stellar feedback. Larger studies should be able to quantify the fraction of all SF that is feedback-triggered by determining the fraction SF, feedback-compressed gas surrounding HII regions relative to that already present in molecular clouds.
  • We present a spectroscopic and photometric determination of the distance to the young Galactic open cluster Westerlund 2 using WFPC2 imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based optical spectroscopy. HST imaging in the F336W, F439W, F555W, and F814W filters resolved many sources previously undetected in ground-based observations and yielded photometry for 1136 stars. We identified fifteen new O-type stars, along with two probable binary systems, including MSP 188 (O3 + O5.5). We fit reddened SEDs based on the Padova isochrones to the photometric data to determine individual reddening parameters $R_{V}$ and $A_{V}$ for O-type stars in Wd2. We find average values $\langle R_{V} \rangle = 3.77 \pm 0.09$ and $\langle A_{V} \rangle = 6.51 \pm 0.38$ mag, which result in a smaller distance than most other spectroscopic and photometric studies. After a statistical distance correction accounting for close unresolved binaries (factor of 1.08), our spectroscopic and photometric data on 29 O-type stars yield that Westerlund 2 has a distance $\langle d \rangle = 4.16 \pm 0.07$ (random) $+0.26$ (systematic) kpc. The cluster's age remains poorly constrained, with an upper limit of 3 Myr. Finally, we report evidence of a faint mid-IR PAH ring surrounding the well-known binary candidate MSP~18, which appears to lie at the center of a secondary stellar grouping within Westerlund 2.
  • We have identified a previously unrecognized population of very compact, embedded low-mass Galactic stellar clusters. These tight (r$ \approx $0.14 pc) groupings appear as bright singular objects at the few arcsec resolution of the Spitzer Space Telescope at 8 and 24 $\mu$m but become resolved in the sub-arcsecond UKIDSS images. They average six stars per cluster surrounded by diffuse infrared emission and coincide with 100 -- 300 M$_{\sun}$ clumps of molecular material within a larger molecular cloud. The magnitudes of the brightest stars are consistent with mid- to early-B stars anchoring $\sim$80 M$_{\sun}$ star clusters. Their evolutionary descendants are likely to be Herbig Ae/Be pre-main sequence clusters. These ultra-compact embedded clusters (UCECs) may fill part of the low-mass void in the embedded cluster mass function. We provide an initial catalog of 18 UCECs drawn from infrared Galactic Plane surveys.
  • Massive binary stars may constitute a substantial fraction of progenitors to supernovae and gamma-ray bursts, and the distribution of their orbital characteristics holds clues to the formation process of massive stars. As a contribution to securing statistics on OB-type binaries, we report the discovery and orbital parameters for five new systems as part of the Cygnus OB2 Radial Velocity Survey. Four of the new systems (MT070, MT174, MT267, and MT734 (a.k.a. VI Cygni #11) are single-lined spectroscopic binaries while one (MT103) is a double-lined system (B1V+B2V). MT070 is noteworthy as the longest period system yet measured in Cyg OB2, with P=6.2 yr. The other four systems have periods ranging between 4 and 73 days. MT174 is noteworthy for having a probable mass ratio q<0.1, making it a candidate progenitor to a low-mass X-ray binary. These measurements bring the total number of massive binaries in Cyg OB2 to 25, the most currently known in any single cluster or association.
  • This work provides a statistical analysis of the massive star binary characteristics in the Cygnus OB2 Association using radial velocity information of 114 B3-O3 primary stars and orbital properties for the 24 known binaries. We compare these data to a series of Monte Carlo simulations to infer the intrinsic binary fraction and distributions of mass ratios, periods, and eccentricities. We model the distribution of mass ratio, log-period, and eccentricity as power-laws and find best fitting indices of alpha=0.1+/-0.5, beta=0.2+/-0.4, and gamma=-0.6+/-0.3 respectively. These distributions indicate a preference for massive companions, short periods, and low eccentricities. Our analysis indicates that the binary fraction of the cluster is 44+/-8% if all binary systems are (artificially) assumed to have P<1000 days; if the power-law period distribution is extrapolated to 10^4 years, a plausible upper limit for bound systems, the binary fraction is ~90+/-10%. Of these binary (or higher order) systems, ~45% will have companions close enough to interact during pre- or post-main-sequence evolution (semi-major axis ~/<4.7 AU). The period distribution for P<27 days is not well reproduced by any single power-law owing to an excess of systems with periods around 3-5 days (0.08-0.31 AU) and a relative shortage of systems with periods around 7-14 days (0.14-0.62 AU). We explore the idea that these longer-period systems evolved to produce the observed excess of short-period systems. The best fitting binary parameters imply that secondaries generate, on average, ~16% of the V-band light in young massive populations. This means that photometrically based distance measurements for young massive clusters & associations will be systematically low by ~8% (0.16 mag in the distance modulus) if the luminous contributions of unresolved secondaries are not taken into account.
  • We report the discovery and orbital solutions for two new OB binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association, MT311 (B2V+B3V) and MT605 (B0.5V+B2.5:V). We also identify the system MT429 as a probable triple system consisting of a tight eclipsing 2.97 day B3V+B6V pair and a B0V at a projected separation of 138 AU. We further provide the first spectroscopic orbital solutions to the eclipsing, double-lined, O-star binary MT696 (O9.5V+B1:V), the double-lined, early B binary MT720 (B0-1V+B1-2V), and the double-lined, O-star binary MT771 (O7V+O9V). These systems exhibit orbital periods between 1.5 days and 12.3 days, with the majority having P<6 days. The two new binary discoveries and six spectroscopic solutions bring the total number of known massive binaries in the central region of the Cygnus OB2 Association to 20, with all but two having full orbital solutions.
  • Mid-infrared images from the Spitzer Space Telescope Galactic Legacy Infrared MidPlane Survey Extraordinaire program reveal that the infrared source IRAS 03063+5735 is a bowshock nebula produced by an early B star, 2MASS 03101044+5747035. We present new optical spectra of this star, classify it as a B1.5 V, and determine a probable association with a molecular cloud complex at V_LSR=-38 -- -42 km/s in the outer Galaxy near l=140.59 degr, b=-0.250 degr. On the basis of spectroscopic parallax, we estimate a distance of 4.0 +/-1 kpc to both the bowshock nebula and the molecular complex. One plausible scenario is that this a high-velocity runaway star impinging upon a molecular cloud. We identify the HII region and stellar cluster associated with IRAS 03064+5638 at a projected distance of 64 pc as one plausible birth site. The spectrophotometric distance and linkage to a molecular feature provides another piece of data helping to secure the ill-determined rotation curve in the outer Galaxy. As a by-product of spectral typing this star, we present empirical spectral diagnostic diagrams suitable for approximate spectral classification of O and B stars using He lines in the little-used yellow-red portion of the optical spectrum.
  • In an effort to understand the factors that govern the transition from low- to high-mass star formation, we identify for the first time a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) where stars up to - but not exceeding - 8 solar masses are being produced. We use IRAS colors and Spitzer Space Telescope mid-IR images, in conjunction with millimeter continuum and CO maps, to compile a sample of 50 IM SFRs in the inner Galaxy. These are likely to be precursors to Herbig AeBe stars and their associated clusters of low-mass stars. IM SFRs constitute embedded clusters at an early evolutionary stage akin to compact HII regions, but they lack the massive ionizing central star(s). The photodissociation regions that demarcate IM SFRs have typical diameters of ~1 pc and luminosities of ~10^4 solar luminosities, making them an order of magnitude less luminous than (ultra)compact HII regions. IM SFRs coincide with molecular clumps of mass ~10^3 solar masses which, in turn, lie within larger molecular clouds spanning the lower end of the giant molecular cloud mass range, 10^4-10^5 solar masses. The IR luminosity and associated molecular mass of IM SFRs are correlated, consistent with the known luminosity-mass relationship of compact HII regions. Peak mass column densities within IM SFRs are ~0.1-0.5 g/cm^2, a factor of several lower than ultra-compact HII regions, supporting the proposition that there is a threshold for massive star formation at ~1 g/cm^2.
  • Chandra X-ray imaging spectroscopy of the starburst galaxy Henize 2-10 reveals a strong nuclear point source and at least two fainter compact sources embedded within a more luminous diffuse thermal component. Spectral fits to the nuclear X-ray source imply an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity L_x >10^40 erg/s for reasonable power law or blackbody models, consistent with accretion onto a >50 solar mass black hole behind a foreground absorbing column of N_H>10^23 /cm^2. Two of these point sources have L_x=2-5 x 10^38 erg/s, comparable to luminous X-ray binaries. These compact sources constitute a small fraction (<16%) of the total X-ray flux from He~2-10 in the 0.3--6.0 keV band and just 31% of the X-rays in the hard 1.1--6.0 keV band which is dominated by diffuse emission. Two-temperature solar-composition plasmas (kT~0.2 keV and kT~0.7 keV) fit the diffuse X-ray component as well as single-temperature plasmas with enhanced alpha/Fe ratios. Since the observed radial gradient of the X-ray surface brightness closely follows that of the Halpha emission, the composition of the X-ray plasma likely reflects mixing of the ambient cool/warm ISM with an even hotter, low emission measure plasma, thereby explaining the ~solar ISM composition. Aperture synthesis 21-cm maps show an extended neutral medium to radii of 60" so that the warm and hot phases of the ISM, which extend to ~30", are enveloped within the 8x10^20 /cm^2 contour of the cool neutral medium. This extended neutral halo may serve to inhibit a starburst-driven outflow unless it is predominantly along the line of sight. The high areal density of star formation can also be reconciled with the lack of prominent outflow signatures if Henize 2-10 is in the very early stages of developing a galactic wind.
  • We use mid-IR images from the Spitzer Cygnus~X Legacy Survey to search for stellar bowshocks, a signature of early type "runaway" stars with high space velocities. We identify ten arc-shaped nebulae containing centrally located stars as candidate bowshocks. New spectroscopic observations of five stars show that all are late O to early B dwarfs. Our morphologically selected sample of bowshock candidates encompasses diverse physical phenomena. Three of the stars appear to be pre-main-sequence objects on the basis of rising SEDs in the mid-IR, and their nebulae may be photon-dominated regions (PDRs). Four objects have ambiguous classification. These may be partial dust shells or bubbles. We conclude that three of the objects are probable bowshocks, based on their morphological similarity to analytic prescriptions. Their nebular morphologies reveal no systematic pattern of orientations that might indicate either a population of stars ejected from or large-scale hydrodynamic outflows from Cyg OB2. The fraction of runaways among OB stars near Cyg OB2 identified either by radial velocity or bowshock techniques is ~0.5%, much smaller than the 8% estimated among field OB stars. We also obtained a heliocentric radial velocity for the previously known bowshock star, BD+43\degr3654, of -66.2+/-9.4 km/s, solidifying its runaway status and implying a space velocity of 77+/-10 km/s. We use the principles of momentum-driven bowshocks to arrive at a novel method for estimating stellar mass loss rates. Derived mass loss rates range between 10^-7 and few x10^-6 solar masses/yr for the three O5V -- ~B2V stars identified as generating bowshocks. These values are at the upper range of, but broadly consistent with, estimates from other methods. (Abridged)
  • We report the discovery of a previously unknown massive Galactic star cluster at l=29.22, b=-0.20. Identified visually in mid-IR images from the Spitzer GLIMPSE survey, the cluster contains at least 8 late-type supergiants, based on followup near-IR spectroscopy, and an additional 3-6 candidate supergiant embers having IR photometry consistent with a similar distance and reddening. The cluster lies at a local minimum in the 13-CO column density and 8 micron emission. We interpret this feature as a hole carved by the energetic winds of the evolving massive stars. The 13-CO hole seen in molecular maps at V_LSR ~95 km/s corresponds to near/far kinematic distances of 6.1/8.7+/-1 kpc. We calculate a mean spectrophotometric distance of 7.0^+3.7_-2.4 kpc, broadly consistent with the kinematic distances inferred. This location places it near the northern end of the Galactic bar. For the mean extinction of A_V=12.6+/-0.5 mag (A_K=1.5+/-0.1 mag), the color-magnitude diagram of probable cluster members is well fit by isochrones in the age range 18-24 Myr. The estimated cluster mass is ~20,000 Msun. With the most massive original cluster stars likely deceased, no strong radio emission is detected in this vicinity. As such, this RSG cluster is representative of adolescent massive Galactic clusters that lie hidden behind many magnitudes of dust obscuration. This cluster joins two similar red supergiant clusters as residents of the volatile region where the end of our Galaxy's bar joins the base of the Scutum-Crux piral arm, suggesting a recent episode of widespread massive star formation there.
  • We measure the physical properties of a local multi-component absorption-line system at V_sol ~ 200 km/s toward the quasar PKS0312-770 behind the Magellanic Bridge (MB) using Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy in conjunction with photoionization modeling. At an impact parameter of ~ 10 kpc from the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), this sightline provides a unique opportunity to probe the chemical properties and ionization structure in a nearby absorption line system with a column density of logN(HI) ~ 20.2, at the transition between Damped Lyman Alpha (DLA) and sub-DLA systems. We find that metallicity of -1.0 < logZ < -0.5 and ionization parameter of -6 < logU < -5 for three low-ionization components and logU ~ -2.6 for one high-ionization component. One component at V_sol = 207 km/s shows an alpha-element abundance log(Si/H) ~ -5.0, making it ~ 0.2 dex more metal rich than both SMC H II regions and stars within the MB and the SMC. The N/Si ratio in this component is log(N/Si) = -0.3+/-0.1, making it comparable to other N-poor dwarf galaxies and ~ 0.2 dex lower than H II regions in the SMC. Another component at V_sol = 236 km/s shows a similar Si/H ratio but has log(N/Si) = -1.0+/-0.2, indicating a nitrogen deficiency comparable to that seen in the most N-poor DLA systems. These differences imply different chemical enrichment histories between components along the same sightline. Our results suggest that, if these absorbers are representative some fraction of DLA systems, then 1) DLA systems along single sight-lines do not necessarily represent the global properties of the absorbing cloud, and b) the chemical composition within a given DLA cloud may be inhomogeneous.
  • As part of an ongoing study to determine the distribution of orbital parameters for massive binaries in the Cygnus OB2 Association, we present the orbital solutions for two new single-lined spectroscopic binaries, MT059 (O8V) & MT258 (O8V), and one double-lined eclipsing binary (Schulte 3). We also constrain the orbital elements of three additional double-lined systems (MT252, MT720, MT771). Periods for all systems range from 1.5-19 days and eccentricities range from 0-0.11. The six new OB binary systems bring the total number of multiple systems within the core region of Cyg OB2 to 11. The current sample does not show evidence for a ``twin-heavy'' binary distribution.
  • VLA and Parkes 64 m radiotelescope 21-cm observations of the starburst dwarf galaxy NGC 5253 reveal a multi-component non-axisymmetric HI distribution. The component associated with the stellar body shows evidence for a small amount of rotational support aligned with the major axis, in agreement with optically measured kinematics and consistent with the small galaxian mass. Approximately 20-30% of the HI emission is associated with a second component, an HI "plume" extending along the optical minor axis to the southeast. We consider outflow, inflow, and tidal origins for this feature. Outflow appears improbable, inflow is a possibility, and tidal debris is most consistent with the observations. These observations also reveal a filamentary third component that includes an 800 pc diameter HI shell or bubble to the west of the nucleus, coinciding with an Halpha shell. The mass of HI in the shell may be as large as ~4x10^6 Msun. This large mass, coupled with the lack of expansion signatures in the neutral and ionized gas (v<30 km/s), suggests that this feature may be an example of a starburst-blown bubble stalled by interaction with a massive neutral envelope. Many other HI kinematic features closely resemble those seen in Halpha emission from the ionized gas, supporting the interpretation of neutral and ionized gas outflow at velocities of ~30 km/s. Comparison between extinction estimates from the Balmer emission-line decrement and the HI column densities suggest a gas-to-dust ratio 2-3 times the Galactic value in this low-metallicity (Z=1/4 Zsun) galaxy.
  • We conducted a radial velocity survey of the Cygnus OB2 Association over a 6 year (1999 - 2005) time interval to search for massive close binaries. During this time we obtained 1139 spectra on 146 OB stars to measure mean systemic radial velocities and radial velocity variations. We spectroscopically identify 73 new OB stars for the first time, the majority of which are likely to be Association members. Spectroscopic evidence is also presented for a B3Iae classification and temperature class variation (B3 - B8) on the order of 1 year for Cygnus OB2 No. 12. Calculations of the intial mass function with the current spectroscopic sample yield Gamma = -2.2 +/- 0.1. Of the 120 stars with the most reliable data, 36 are probable and 9 are possible single-lined spectroscopic binaries. We also identify 3 new and 8 candidate double-lined spectroscopic binaries. These data imply a lower limit on the massive binary fraction of 30% - 42%. The calculated velocity dispersion for Cygnus OB2 is 2.44 +/- km/s, which is typical of open clusters. No runaway OB stars were found.