• In quantum gravity perturbation theory in Newton's constant G is known to be badly divergent, and as a result not very useful. Nevertheless some of the most interesting phenomena in physics are often associated with non-analytic behavior in the coupling constant and the existence of nontrivial quantum condensates. It is therefore possible that pathologies encountered in the case of gravity are more likely the result of inadequate analytical treatment, and not necessarily a reflection of some intrinsic insurmountable problem. The nonperturbative treatment of quantum gravity via the Regge-Wheeler lattice path integral formulation reveals the existence of a new phase involving a nontrivial gravitational vacuum condensate, and a new set of scaling exponents characterizing both the running of G and the long-distance behavior of invariant correlation functions. The appearance of such a gravitational condensate is viewed as analogous to the (equally nonperturbative) gluon and chiral condensates known to describe the physical vacuum of QCD. The resulting quantum theory of gravity is highly constrained, and its physical predictions are found to depend only on one adjustable parameter, a genuinely nonperturbative scale xi in many ways analogous to the scaling violation parameter Lambda MSbar of QCD. Recent results point to significant deviations from classical gravity on distance scales approaching the effective infrared cutoff set by the observed cosmological constant. Such subtle quantum effects are expected to be initially small on current cosmological scales, but could become detectable in future high precision satellite experiments.
  • In this work nonperturbative aspects of quantum gravity are investigated using the lattice formulation, and some new results are presented for critical exponents, amplitudes and invariant correlation functions. Values for the universal scaling dimensions are compared with other nonperturbative approaches to gravity in four dimensions, and specifically to the conjectured value for the universal critical exponent $\nu =1 /3$. It is found that the lattice results are generally consistent with gravitational anti-screening, which would imply a slow increase in the strength of the gravitational coupling with distance, and here detailed estimates for exponents and amplitudes characterizing this slow rise are presented. Furthermore, it is shown that in the lattice approach (as for gauge theories) the quantum theory is highly constrained, and eventually by virtue of scaling depends on a rather small set of physical parameters. Arguments are given in support of the statement that the fundamental reference scale for the growth of the gravitational coupling $G$ with distance is represented by the observed scaled cosmological constant $\lambda$, which in gravity acts as an effective nonperturbative infrared cutoff. In the vacuum condensate picture a fundamental relationship emerges between the scale characterizing the running of $G$ at large distances, the macroscopic scale for the curvature as described by the observed cosmological constant, and the behavior of invariant gravitational correlation functions at large distances. Overall, the lattice results suggest that the infrared slow growth of $G$ with distance should become observable only on very large distance scales, comparable to $\lambda$. It is hoped that future high precision satellite experiments will possibly come within reach of this small quantum correction, as suggested by a vacuum condensate picture of quantum gravity.
  • In some models of electro-weak interactions the W and Z bosons are considered composites, made up of spin-one-half subconstituents. In these models a spin zero counterpart of the W and Z boson naturally appears, whose higher mass can be attributed to a particular type of hyperfine spin interaction among the various subconstituents. Recently it has been argued that the scalar state could be identified with the newly discovered Higgs (H) candidate. Here we use the known spin splitting between the W/Z and H states to infer, within the framework of a purely phenomenological model, the relative strength of the spin-spin interactions. The results are then applied to the lepton sector, and used to crudely estimate the relevant spin splitting between the two lowest states. Our calculations in many ways parallels what is done in the SU(6) quark model, where most of the spin splittings between the lowest lying baryon and meson states are reasonably well accounted for by a simple color hyperfine interaction, with constituent (color-dressed) quark masses.
  • Physical properties of the quantum gravitational vacuum state are explored by solving a lattice version of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation. The constraint of diffeomorphism invariance is strong enough to uniquely determine the structure of the vacuum wave functional in the limit of infinitely fine triangulations of the three-sphere. In the large fluctuation regime the nature of the wave function solution is such that a physically acceptable ground state emerges, with a finite non-perturbative correlation length naturally cutting off any infrared divergences. The location of the critical point in Newton's constant $G_c$, separating the weak from the strong coupling phase, is obtained, and it is inferred from the structure of the wave functional that fluctuations in the curvatures become unbounded at this point. Investigations of the vacuum wave functional further suggest that for weak enough coupling, $G<G_c$, a pathological ground state with no continuum limit appears, where configurations with small curvature have vanishingly small probability. One is then lead to the conclusion that the weak coupling, perturbative ground state of quantum gravity is non-perturbatively unstable, and that gravitational screening cannot be physically realized in the lattice theory. The results we find are in general agreement with the Euclidean lattice gravity results, and lend further support to the claim that the Lorentzian and Euclidean lattice formulations for gravity describe the same underlying non-perturbative physics.
  • We examine the general issue of whether a scale dependent cosmological constant can be consistent with general covariance, a problem that arises naturally in the treatment of quantum gravitation where coupling constants generally run as a consequence of renormalization group effects. The issue is approached from several points of view, which include the manifestly covariant functional integral formulation, covariant continuum perturbation theory about two dimensions, the lattice formulation of gravity, and the non-local effective action and effective field equation methods. In all cases we find that the cosmological constant cannot run with scale, unless general covariance is explicitly broken by the regularization procedure. Our results are expected to have some bearing on current quantum gravity calculations, but more generally should apply to phenomenological approaches to the cosmological vacuum energy problem.
  • The infrared structure of quantum gravity is explored by solving a lattice version of the Wheeler-DeWitt equations. In the present paper only the case of 2+1 dimensions is considered. The nature of the wavefunction solutions is such that a finite correlation length emerges and naturally cuts off any infrared divergences. Properties of the lattice vacuum are consistent with the existence of an ultraviolet fixed point in $G$ located at the origin, thus precluding the existence of a weak coupling perturbative phase. The correlation length exponent is determined exactly and found to be $\nu=6/11$. The results obtained so far lend support to the claim that the Lorentzian and Euclidean formulations belong to the same field-theoretic universality class.
  • We present a discrete form of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for quantum gravitation, based on the lattice formulation due to Regge. In this setup the infinite-dimensional manifold of 3-geometries is replaced by a space of three-dimensional piecewise linear spaces, with the solutions to the lattice equations providing a suitable approximation to the continuum wave functional. The equations incorporate a set of constraints on the quantum wavefunctional, arising from the triangle inequalities and their higher dimensional analogs. The character of the solutions is discussed in the strong coupling (large $G$) limit, where it is shown that the wavefunctional only depends on geometric quantities, such as areas and volumes. An explicit form, determined from the discrete wave equation supplemented by suitable regularity conditions, shows peaks corresponding to integer multiples of a fundamental unit of volume. An application of the variational method using correlated product wavefunctions suggests a relationship between quantum gravity in $n+1$ dimensions, and averages computed in the Euclidean path integral formulation in $n$ dimensions. The proposed discrete equations could provide a useful, and complementary, computational alternative to the Euclidean lattice path integral approach to quantum gravity.
  • In classical gravity deviations from the predictions of the Einstein theory are often discussed within the framework of the conformal Newtonian gauge, where scalar perturbations are described by two potentials $\phi$ and $\psi$. In this paper we use the above gauge to explore possible cosmological consequences of a running Newton's constant $ G (\Box) $, as suggested by the nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point scenario arising from the quantum field-theoretic treatment of Einstein gravity with a cosmological constant term. Here we focus on the effects of a scale-dependent coupling on the so-called gravitational slip functions $\eta = \psi / \phi -1 $, whose classical general relativity value is zero. Starting from a set of manifestly covariant but non-local effective field equations derived earlier, we compute the leading corrections in the potentials $\phi$ and $\psi$ for a nonrelativistic, pressureless fluid. After providing an estimate for the quantity $\eta$, we then focus on a comparison with results obtained in a previous paper on matter density perturbations in the synchronous gauge, which gave an estimate for the growth index parameter $\gamma$, also in the presence of a running $G$. Our results indicate that, in the present framework and for a given $ G (\Box) $, the corrections tend to be significantly larger in magnitude for the perturbation growth exponents than for the conformal Newtonian gauge slip function.
  • Results for the gravitational Wilson loop, in particular the area law for large loops in the strong coupling region, and the argument for an effective positive cosmological constant discussed in a previous paper, are extended to other proposed theories of discrete quantum gravity in the strong coupling limit. We argue that the area law is a generic feature of almost all non-perturbative lattice formulations, for sufficiently strong gravitational coupling. The effects on gravitational Wilson loops of the inclusion of various types of light matter coupled to lattice quantum gravity are discussed as well. One finds that significant modifications to the area law can only arise from extremely light matter particles. The paper ends with some general comments on possible physically observable consequences.
  • We explore possible cosmological consequences of a running Newton's constant $ G ( \Box ) $, as suggested by the non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point scenario in the quantum field-theoretic treatment of Einstein gravity with a cosmological constant term. In particular we focus here on what possible effects the scale-dependent coupling might have on large scale cosmological density perturbations. Starting from a set of manifestly covariant effective field equations derived earlier, we systematically develop the linear theory of density perturbations for a non-relativistic, pressure-less fluid. The result is a modified equation for the matter density contrast, which can be solved and thus provides an estimate for the growth index parameter $\gamma$ in the presence of a running $G$. We complete our analysis by comparing the fully relativistic treatment with the corresponding results for the non-relativistic (Newtonian) case, the latter also with a weakly scale dependent $G$.
  • I review the field-theoretic renomalization group approach to quantum gravity, built around the existence of a non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point in four dimensions. I discuss the implications of such a fixed point, found in three largely unrelated non-perturbative approaches, and how it relates to the vacuum state of quantum gravity, and specifically to the running of $G$. One distinctive feature of the new fixed point is the emergence of a second genuinely non-perturbative scale, analogous to the scaling violation parameter in non-abelian gauge theories. I argue that it is natural to identify such a scale with the small observed cosmological constant, which in quantum gravity can arise as a non-perturbative vacuum condensate. (Plenary Talk, 12-th Marcel Grossmann Conference on Recent Developments in General Relativity, Astrophysics and Relativistic Field Theories, UNESCO Paris, July 12-18, 2009).
  • I review discrete and continuum approaches to quantized gravity based on the covariant Feynman path integral approach.
  • I review the lattice approach to quantum gravity, and how it relates to the non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point scenario of the continuum theory. After a brief introduction covering the general problem of ultraviolet divergences in gravity and other non-renormalizable theories, I cover the general methods and goals of the lattice approach. An underlying theme is the attempt at establishing connections between the continuum renormalization group results, which are mainly based on diagrammatic perturbation theory, and the recent lattice results, which apply to the strong gravity regime and are inherently non-perturbative. A second theme in this review is the ever-present natural correspondence between infrared methods of strongly coupled non-abelian gauge theories on the one hand, and the low energy approach to quantum gravity based on the renormalization group and universality of critical behavior on the other. Towards the end of the review I discuss possible observational consequences of path integral quantum gravity, as derived from the non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point scenario. I argue that the theoretical framework naturally leads to considering a weakly scale-dependent Newton's costant, with a scaling violation parameter related to the observed scaled cosmological constant (and not, as naively expected, to the Planck length).
  • In a quantum theory of gravity the gravitational Wilson loop, defined as a suitable quantum average of a parallel transport operator around a large near-planar loop, provides important information about the large-scale curvature properties of the geometry. Here we shows that such properties can be systematically computed in the strong coupling limit of lattice regularized quantum gravity, by performing a local average over rotations, using an assumed near-uniform measure in group space. We then relate the resulting quantum averages to an expected semi-classical form valid for macroscopic observers, which leads to an identification of the gravitational correlation length appearing in the Wilson loop with an observed large-scale curvature. Our results suggest that strongly coupled gravity leads to a positively curved (De Sitter-like) quantum ground state, implying a positive effective cosmological constant at large distances.
  • Quantum corrections to the classical field equations, induced by a scale dependent gravitational constant, are analyzed in the case of the static isotropic metric. The requirement of general covariance for the resulting non-local effective field equations puts severe restrictions on the nature of the solutions that can be obtained. In general the existence of vacuum solutions to the effective field equations restricts the value of the gravitational scaling exponent $\nu^{-1}$ to be a positive integer greater than one. We give further arguments suggesting that in fact only for $\nu^{-1}=3$ consistent solutions seem to exist in four dimensions.
  • Corrections are computed to the classical static isotropic solution of general relativity, arising from non-perturbative quantum gravity effects. A slow rise of the effective gravitational coupling with distance is shown to involve a genuinely non-perturbative scale, closely connected with the gravitational vacuum condensate, and thereby, it is argued, related to the observed effective cosmological constant. Several analogies between the proposed vacuum condensate picture of quantum gravitation, and non-perturbative aspects of vacuum condensation in strongly coupled non-abelian gauge theories are developed. In contrast to phenomenological approaches, the underlying functional integral formulation of the theory severely constrains possible scenarios for the renormalization group evolution of couplings. The expected running of Newton's constant $G$ is compared to known vacuum polarization induced effects in QED and QCD. The general analysis is then extended to a set of covariant non-local effective field equations, intended to incorporate the full scale dependence of $G$, and examined in the case of the static isotropic metric. The existence of vacuum solutions to the effective field equations in general severely restricts the possible values of the scaling exponent $\nu$.
  • Quantum gravity is investigated in the limit of a large number of space-time dimensions, using as an ultraviolet regularization the simplicial lattice path integral formulation. In the weak field limit the appropriate expansion parameter is determined to be $1/d$. For the case of a simplicial lattice dual to a hypercube, the critical point is found at $k_c/\lambda=1/d$ (with $k=1/8 \pi G$) separating a weak coupling from a strong coupling phase, and with $2 d^2$ degenerate zero modes at $k_c$. The strong coupling, large $G$, phase is then investigated by analyzing the general structure of the strong coupling expansion in the large $d$ limit. Dominant contributions to the curvature correlation functions are described by large closed random polygonal surfaces, for which excluded volume effects can be neglected at large $d$, and whose geometry we argue can be approximated by unconstrained random surfaces in this limit. In large dimensions the gravitational correlation length is then found to behave as $| \log (k_c - k) |^{1/2}$, implying for the universal gravitational critical exponent the value $\nu=0$ at $d=\infty$.
  • Non-perturbative studies of quantum gravity have recently suggested the possibility that the strength of gravitational interactions might slowly increase with distance. Here a set of generally covariant effective field equations are proposed, which are intended to incorporate the gravitational, vacuum-polarization induced, running of Newton's constant $G$. One attractive feature of this approach is that, from an underlying quantum gravity perspective, the resulting long distance (or large time) effective gravitational action inherits only one adjustable parameter $\xi$, having the units of a length, arising from dimensional transmutation in the gravitational sector. Assuming the above scenario to be correct, some simple predictions for the long distance corrections to the classical standard model Robertson-Walker metric are worked out in detail, with the results formulated as much as possible in a model-independent framework. It is found that the theory, even in the limit of vanishing renormalized cosmological constant, generally predicts an accelerated power-law expansion at later times $t \sim \xi \sim 1/H$.
  • The possibility that the strength of gravitational interactions might slowly increase with distance, is explored by formulating a set of effective field equations, which incorporate the gravitational, vacuum-polarization induced, running of Newton's constant $G$. The resulting long distance (or large time) behaviour depends on only one adjustable parameter $\xi$, and the implications for the Robertson-Walker universe are calculated, predicting an accelerated power-law expansion at later times $t \sim \xi \sim 1/H$.
  • The lattice formulation of quantum gravity provides a natural framework in which non-perturbative properties of the ground state can be studied in detail. In this paper we investigate how the lattice results relate to the continuum semiclassical expansion about smooth manifolds. As an example we give an explicit form for the lattice ground state wave functional for semiclassical geometries. We then do a detailed comparison between the more recent predictions from the lattice regularized theory, and results obtained in the continuum for the non-trivial ultraviolet fixed point of quantum gravity found using weak field and non-perturbative methods. In particular we focus on the derivative of the beta function at the fixed point and the related universal critical exponent $\nu$ for gravitation. Based on recently available lattice and continuum results we assess the evidence for the presence of a massless spin two particle in the continuum limit of the strongly coupled lattice theory. Finally we compare the lattice prediction for the vacuum-polarization induced weak scale dependence of the gravitational coupling with recent calculations in the continuum, finding similar effects.
  • A model for quantum gravity in one (time) dimension is discussed, based on Regge's discrete formulation of gravity. The nature of exact continuous lattice diffeomorphisms and the implications for a regularized gravitational measure are examined. After introducing a massless scalar field coupled to the edge lengths, the scalar functional integral is performed exactly on a finite lattice, and the ensuing change in the measure is determined. It is found that the renormalization of the cosmological constant due to the scalar field fluctuations vanishes identically in one dimension. A simple decimation renormalization group transformation is performed on the partition function and the results are compared with the exact solution. Finally the properties of the spectrum of the scalar Laplacian are compared with results obtained for a Poissonian distribution of edge lengths.
  • Some first results are presented regarding the behavior of invariant correlations in simplicial gravity, with an action containing both a bare cosmological term and a lattice higher derivative term. The determination of invariant correlations as a function of geodesic distance by numerical methods is a difficult task, since the geodesic distance between any two points is a function of the fluctuating background geometry, and correlation effects become rather small for large distances. Still, a strikingly different behavior is found for the volume and curvature correlation functions. While the first one is found to be negative definite at large geodesic distances, the second one is always positive for large distances. For both correlations the results are consistent in the smooth phase with an exponential decay, turning into a power law close to the critical point at $G_c$. Such a behavior is not completely unexpected, if the model is to reproduce the classical Einstein theory at distances much larger than the ultraviolet cutoff scale.
  • A model describing Ising spins with short range interactions moving randomly in a plane is considered. In the presence of a hard core repulsion, which prevents the Ising spins from overlapping, the model is analogous to a dynamically triangulated Ising model with spins constrained to move on a flat surface. As a function of coupling strength and hard core repulsion the model exhibits multicritical behavior, with first and second order transition lines terminating at a tricritical point. The thermal and magnetic exponents computed at the tricritical point are consistent with the KPZ values associated with Ising spins, and with the exact two-matrix model solution of the random Ising model, introduced previously to describe the effects of fluctuating geometries.
  • We show how the Newtonian potential between two heavy masses can be computed in simplicial quantum gravity. On the lattice we compute correlations between Wilson lines associated with the heavy particles and which are closed by the lattice periodicity. We check that the continuum analog of this quantity reproduces the Newtonian potential in the weak field expansion. In the smooth anti-de Sitter-like phase, which is the only phase where a sensible lattice continuum limit can be constructed in this model, we attempt to determine the shape and mass dependence of the attractive potential close to the critical point in $G$. It is found that non-linear graviton interactions give rise to a potential which is Yukawa-like, with a mass parameter that decreases towards the critical point where the average curvature vanishes. In the vicinity of the critical point we give an estimate for the effective Newton constant.
  • I discuss some results we have obtained recently in a lattice model for quantized gravity coupled to scalar matter in four dimensions. We have looked at how the continuous phase transition separating the smooth from the rough phase of gravity is influenced by the presence of the scalar field. We find that close to the critical point, where the average curvature approaches zero, the effects of the scalar field are small and the coupling of matter to gravity seems to be weak. The nature of the phase diagram and the values for the critical exponents would suggest that gravitational interactions increase with distance.