• Future quantum devices often rely on favourable scaling with respect to the system components. To achieve desirable scaling, it is therefore crucial to implement unitary transformations in an efficient manner. We develop an upper bound for the minimum time required to implement a unitary transformation on a generic qubit network in which each of the qubits is subject to local time dependent controls. The set of gates is characterized that can be implemented in a time that scales at most polynomially in the number of qubits. Furthermore, we show how qubit systems can be concatenated through controllable two body interactions, making it possible to implement the gate set efficiently on the combined system. Finally a system is identified for which the gate set can be implemented with fewer controls. The considered model is particularly important, since it describes electron-nuclear spin interactions in NV centers.
  • In the quest to achieve scalable quantum information processing technologies, gradient-based optimal control algorithms (e.g., GRAPE) are broadly used for implementing high-precision quantum gates, but their performance is often hindered by deterministic or random errors in the system model and the control electronics. In this paper, we show that GRAPE can be taught to be more effective by jointly learning from the design model and the experimental data obtained from process tomography. The resulting data-driven gradient optimization algorithm (d-GRAPE) can in principle correct all deterministic gate errors, with a mild efficiency loss. The d-GRAPE algorithm may become more powerful with broadband controls that involve a large number of control parameters, while other algorithms usually slow down due to the increased size of the search space. These advantages are demonstrated by simulating the implementation of a two-qubit CNOT gate.
  • We extend the work in New J. Phys. 19, 103015 (2017) by deriving a lower bound for the minimum time necessary to implement a unitary transformation on a generic, closed quantum system with an arbitrary number of classical control fields. This bound is explicitly analyzed for a specific N-level system similar to those used to represent simple models of an atom, or the first excitation sector of a Heisenberg spin chain, both of which are of interest in quantum control for quantum computation. Specifically, it is shown that the resultant bound depends on the dimension of the system, and on the number of controls used to implement a specific target unitary operation. The value of the bound determined numerically, and an estimate of the true minimum gate time are systematically compared for a range of system dimension and number of controls; special attention is drawn to the relationship between these two variables. It is seen that the bound captures the scaling of the minimum time well for the systems studied, and quantitatively is correct in the order of magnitude.
  • We establish three tractable, jointly sufficient conditions for the control landscapes of non-linear control systems to be trap free comparable to those now well known in quantum control. In particular, our results encompass end-point control problems for a general class of non-linear control systems of the form of a linear time invariant term with an additional state dependent non-linear term. Trap free landscapes ensure that local optimization methods (such as gradient ascent) can achieve monotonic convergence to effective control schemes in both simulation and practice. Within a large class of non-linear control problems, each of the three conditions is shown to hold for all but a null set of cases. Furthermore, we establish a Lipschitz condition for two of these assumptions; under specific circumstances, we explicitly find the associated Lipschitz constants. A detailed numerical investigation using the D-MOPRH control optimization algorithm is presented for a specific family of systems which meet the conditions for possessing trap free control landscapes. The results obtained confirm the trap free nature of the landscapes of such systems.
  • In this work we derive a lower bound for the minimum time required to implement a target unitary transformation through a classical time-dependent field in a closed quantum system. The bound depends on the target gate, the strength of the internal Hamiltonian and the highest permitted control field amplitude. These findings reveal some properties of the reachable set of operations, explicitly analyzed for a single qubit. Moreover, for fully controllable systems, we identify a lower bound for the time at which all unitary gates become reachable. We use numerical gate optimization in order to study the tightness of the obtained bounds. It is shown that in the single qubit case our analytical findings describe the relationship between the highest control field amplitude and the minimum evolution time remarkably well. Finally, we discuss both challenges and ways forward for obtaining tighter bounds for higher dimensional systems, offering a discussion about the mathematical form and the physical meaning of the bound.
  • Robust control design for quantum systems has been recognized as a key task in quantum information technology, molecular chemistry and atomic physics. In this paper, an improved differential evolution algorithm of msMS_DE is proposed to search robust fields for various quantum control problems. In msMS_DE, multiple samples are used for fitness evaluation and a mixed strategy is employed for mutation operation. In particular, the msMS_DE algorithm is applied to the control problem of open inhomogeneous quantum ensembles and the consensus problem of a quantum network with uncertainties. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the excellent performance of the improved DE algorithm for these two classes of quantum robust control problems. Furthermore, msMS_DE is experimentally implemented on femtosecond laser control systems to generate good signals of two photon absorption and control fragmentation of halomethane molecules CH2BrI. Experimental results demonstrate excellent performance of msMS_DE in searching effective femtosecond laser pulses for various tasks.
  • We show that a laser pulse can always be found that induces a desired optical response from an arbitrary dynamical system. As illustrations, driving fields are computed to induce the same optical response from a variety of distinct systems (open and closed, quantum and classical). As a result, the observed induced dipolar spectra without detailed information on the driving field is not sufficient to characterize atomic and molecular systems. The formulation may also be applied to design materials with specified optical characteristics. These findings reveal unexplored flexibilities of nonlinear optics.
  • The broad success of theoretical and experimental quantum optimal control is intimately connected to the topology of the underlying control landscape. For several common quantum control goals, including the maximization of an observable expectation value, the landscape has been shown to lack local optima if three assumptions are satisfied: (i) the quantum system is controllable, (ii) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is full-rank, and (iii) the control field is not constrained. In the case of the observable objective, this favorable analysis shows that the associated landscape also contains saddles, i.e., critical points that are not local suboptimal extrema. In this paper, we investigate whether the presence of these saddles affects the trajectories of gradient-based searches for an optimal control. We show through simulations that both the detailed topology of the control landscape and the parameters of the system Hamiltonian influence whether the searches are attracted to a saddle. For some circumstances with a special initial state and target observable, optimizations may approach a saddle very closely, reducing the efficiency of the gradient algorithm. Encounters with such attractive saddles are found to be quite rare. Neither the presence of a large number of saddles on the control landscape nor a large number of system states increase the likelihood that a search will closely approach a saddle. Even for applications that encounter a saddle, well-designed gradient searches with carefully chosen algorithmic parameters will readily locate optimal controls.
  • We present a comprehensive analysis of the landscape for full quantum-quantum control associated with the expectation value of an arbitrary observable of one quantum system controlled by another quantum system. It is shown that such full quantum-quantum control landscapes are convex, and hence devoid of local suboptima and saddle points that may exist in landscapes for quantum systems controlled by time-dependent classical fields. There is no controllability requirement for the full quantum-quantum landscape to be trap-free, although the forms of Hamiltonians, the flexibility in choosing initial state of the controller, as well as the control duration, can infulence the reachable optimal value on the landscape. All level sets of the full quantum-quantum landscape are connected convex sets. Finally, we show that the optimal solution of the full quantum-quantum control landscape can be readily determined numerically, which is demonstrated using the Jaynes-Cummings model depicting a two-level atom interacting with a quantized radiation field.
  • A common goal in the sciences is optimization of an objective function by selecting control variables such that a desired outcome is achieved. This scenario can be expressed in terms of a control landscape of an objective considered as a function of the control variables. At the most basic level, it is known that the vast majority of quantum control landscapes possess no traps, whose presence would hinder reaching the objective. This paper reviews and extends the quantum control landscape assessment, presenting evidence that the same highly favorable landscape features exist in many other domains of science. The implications of this broader evidence are discussed. Specifically, control landscape examples from quantum mechanics, chemistry, and evolutionary biology are presented. Despite the obvious differences, commonalities between these areas are highlighted within a unified mathematical framework. This mathematical framework is driven by the wide ranging experimental evidence on the ease of finding optimal controls (in terms of the required algorithmic search effort beyond laboratory set up overhead). The full scope and implications of this observed common control behavior pose an open question for assessment in further work.
  • A proof that almost all quantum systems have trap free (that is, free from local optima) landscapes is presented for a large and physically general class of quantum system. This result offers an explanation for why gradient methods succeed so frequently in quantum control in both theory and practice. The role of singular controls is analyzed using geometric tools in the case of the control of the propagator of closed finite dimension systems. This type of control field has been implicated as a source of landscape traps. The conditions under which singular controls can introduce traps, and thus interrupt the progress of a control optimization, are discussed and a geometrical characterization of the issue is presented. It is shown that a control being singular is not sufficient to cause a control optimization progress to halt and sufficient conditions for a trap free landscape are presented. It is further shown that the local surjectivity axiom of landscape analysis can be refined to the condition that the end-point map is transverse to each of the level sets of the fidelity function. This novel condition is shown to be sufficient for a quantum system's landscape to be trap free. The control landscape for a quantum system is shown to be trap free for all but a null set of Hamiltonians using a novel geometric technique based on the parametric transversality theorem. Numerical evidence confirming this is also presented. This result is the analogue of the work of Altifini, wherein it is shown that controllability holds for all but a null set of quantum systems in the dipole approximation. The presented results indicate that by-and-large limited control resources are the most physically relevant source of landscape traps.
  • Here we consider the speed at which quantum information can be transferred between the nodes of a linear network. Because such nodes are linear oscillators, this speed is also important in the cooling and state preparation of mechanical oscillators, as well as frequency conversion. We show that if there is no restriction on the size of the linear coupling between two oscillators, then there exist control protocols that will swap their respective states with high fidelity within a time much less than a single oscillation period. Standard gradient search methods fail to find these fast protocols. We were able to do so by augmenting standard search methods with a path-tracing technique, demonstrating that this technique has remarkable power to solve time-optimal control problems, as well as confirming the highly challenging nature of these problems. As a further demonstration of the power of path-tracing, first introduced by Moore-Tibbets et al. [Phys. Rev. A 86, 062309 (2012)], we apply it to the generation of entanglement in a linear network.
  • Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) offer the potential to examine quantum behavior at large length and time scales, as well as forming promising candidates for quantum technology applications. Thus, the manipulation of BECs using control fields is a topic of prime interest. We consider BECs in the mean field model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), which contains linear and nonlinear features, both of which are subject to control. In this work we report successful optimal control simulations of a one dimensional GPE by modulating the linear and nonlinear terms to stimulate transitions into excited coherent modes. The linear and nonlinear controls are allowed to freely vary over space and time to seek their optimal forms. The determination of the excited coherent modes targeted for optimization is numerically performed through an adaptive imaginary time propagation method. Numerical simulations are performed for optimal control of mode-to-mode transitions between the ground coherent mode and excited modes of a BEC trapped in a harmonic well. The results show greater than 99% success for nearly all trials utilizing reasonable initial guesses for the controls, and analysis of the optimal controls reveals primarily direct transitions between initial and target modes. The success of using solely the nonlinearity term as a control opens up further research toward exploring novel control mechanisms inaccessible to linear Schr\"odinger-type systems.
  • We investigate the control landscapes of closed, finite level quantum systems beyond the dipole approximation by including a polarizability term in the Hamiltonian. Theoretical analysis is presented for the $n$ level case and formulas for singular controls, which are candidates for landscape traps, are compared to their analogues in the dipole approximation. A numerical analysis of the existence of traps in control landscapes beyond the dipole approximation is made in the four level case. A numerical exploration of these control landscapes is achieved by generating many random Hamiltonians which include a term quadratic in a single control field. The landscapes of such systems are found numerically to be trap free in general. This extends a great body of recent work on typical landscapes of quantum systems where the dipole approximation is made. We further investigate the relationship between the magnitude of the polarizability and the magnitude of the controls resulting from optimization. It is shown numerically that including a polarizability term in an otherwise uncontrollable system removes traps from the landscapes of a specific family of systems by restoring controllability. We numerically assess the effect of a random polarizability term on the know example of a three level system with a second order trap in its control landscape. It is found that the addition of polarizability removes the trap from the landscape. The implications for laboratory control are discussed.
  • The purpose of this paper is to solve a fault tolerant filtering and fault detection problem for a class of open quantum systems driven by a continuous-mode bosonic input field in single photon states when the systems are subject to stochastic faults. Optimal estimates of both the system observables and the fault process are simultaneously calculated and characterized by a set of coupled recursive quantum stochastic differential equations.
  • Decoherence of a central spin coupled to an interacting spin bath via inhomogeneous Heisenberg coupling is studied by two different approaches, namely an exact equations of motion (EOMs) method and a Chebyshev expansion technique (CET). By assuming a wheel topology of the bath spins with uniform nearest-neighbor $XX$-type intrabath coupling, we examine the central spin dynamics with the bath prepared in two different types of bath initial conditions. For fully polarized baths in strong magnetic fields, the polarization dynamics of the central spin exhibits a collapse-revival behavior in the intermediate-time regime. Under an antiferromagnetic bath initial condition, the two methods give excellently consistent central spin decoherence dynamics for finite-size baths of $N\leq14$ bath spins. The decoherence factor is found to drop off abruptly on a short time scale and approach a finite plateau value which depends on the intrabath coupling strength non-monotonically. In the ultrastrong intrabath coupling regime, the plateau values show an oscillatory behavior depending on whether $N/2$ is even or odd. The observed results are interpreted qualitatively within the framework of the EOM and perturbation analysis. The effects of anisotropic spin-bath coupling and inhomogeneous intrabath bath couplings are briefly discussed. Possible experimental realization of the model in a modified quantum corral setup is suggested.
  • Robust control design for quantum systems has been recognized as a key task in the development of practical quantum technology. In this paper, we present a systematic numerical methodology of sampling-based learning control (SLC) for control design of quantum systems with uncertainties. The SLC method includes two steps of "training" and "testing". In the training step, an augmented system is constructed using artificial samples generated by sampling uncertainty parameters according to a given distribution. A gradient flow based learning algorithm is developed to find the control for the augmented system. In the process of testing, a number of additional samples are tested to evaluate the control performance where these samples are obtained through sampling the uncertainty parameters according to a possible distribution. The SLC method is applied to three significant examples of quantum robust control including state preparation in a three-level quantum system, robust entanglement generation in a two-qubit superconducting circuit and quantum entanglement control in a two-atom system interacting with a quantized field in a cavity. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the SLC approach even when uncertainties are quite large, and show its potential for robust control design of quantum systems.
  • Simultaneous optimization of multiple quantum objectives is often considered a demanding task. However, a special circumstance arises when a primary objective is pitted against a set of secondary objectives, which we show leads to invariant behavior of the secondary objectives upon the primary one approaching its optimal value. Still, practical relationships among the objectives will generally lead to a threshold, beyond which system re-engineering is required to further increase the primary objective. This finding is of broad significance for reaching high performance in quantum technologies
  • In quantum optimal control theory, kinematic bounds are the minimum and maximum values of the control objective achievable for any physically realizable system dynamics. For a given initial state of the system, these bounds depend on the nature and state of the controller. We consider a general situation where the controlled quantum system is coupled to both an external classical field (referred to as a classical controller) and an auxiliary quantum system (referred to as a quantum controller). In this general situation, the kinematic bound is between the classical kinematic bound (CKB), corresponding to the case when only the classical controller is available, and the quantum kinematic bound (QKB), corresponding to the ultimate physical limit of the objective's value. Specifically, when the control objective is the expectation value of a quantum observable (a Hermitian operator on the system's Hilbert space), the QKBs are the minimum and maximum eigenvalues of this operator. We present, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the necessary and sufficient conditions for surpassing the CKB and reaching the QKB, through the use of a quantum controller. The general conditions are illustrated by examples in which the system and controller are initially in thermal states. The obtained results provide a basis for the design of quantum controllers capable of maximizing the control yield and reaching the ultimate physical limit.
  • The growing successes in performing quantum control experiments motivated the development of control landscape analysis as a basis to explain these findings.When a quantum system is controlled by an electromagnetic field, the observable as a functional of the control field forms a landscape. Theoretical analyses have revealed many properties of control landscapes, especially regarding their slopes, curvatures, and topologies. A full experimental assessment of the landscape predictions is important for future consideration of controlling quantum phenomena. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is exploited here as an ideal laboratory setting for quantitative testing of the landscape principles. The experiments are performed on a simple two-level proton system in a H$_2$O-D$_2$O sample. We report a variety of NMR experiments roving over the control landscape based on estimation of the gradient and Hessian, including ascent or descent of the landscape, level set exploration, and an assessment of the theoretical predictions on the structure of the Hessian. The experimental results are fully consistent with the theoretical predictions. The procedures employed in this study provide the basis for future multispin control landscape exploration where additional features are predicted to exist.
  • The fraction of positrons and electrons in cosmic rays recently observed on the International Space Station unveiled an unexpected excess of the positrons, undermining the current foundations of cosmic rays sources. We provide a quantum electrodynamics phenomenological model explaining the observed data. This model incorporates electroproduction, in which cosmic ray electrons decelerating in the interstellar medium emit photons that turn into electron-positron pairs. These findings not only advance our knowledge of cosmic ray physics, but also pave the way for computationally efficient formulations of quantum electrodynamics, critically needed in physics and chemistry.
  • The success of quantum optimal control for both experimental and theoretical objectives is connected to the topology of the corresponding control landscapes, which are free from local traps if three conditions are met: (1) the quantum system is controllable, (2) the Jacobian of the map from the control field to the evolution operator is of full rank, and (3) there are no constraints on the control field. This paper investigates how the violation of assumption (3) affects gradient searches for globally optimal control fields. The satisfaction of assumptions (1) and (2) ensures that the control landscape lacks fundamental traps, but certain control constraints can still introduce artificial traps. Proper management of these constraints is an issue of great practical importance for numerical simulations as well as optimization in the laboratory. Using optimal control simulations, we show that constraints on quantities such as the number of control variables, the control duration, and the field strength are potentially severe enough to prevent successful optimization of the objective. For each such constraint, we show that exceeding quantifiable limits can prevent gradient searches from reaching a globally optimal solution. These results demonstrate that careful choice of relevant control parameters helps to eliminate artificial traps and facilitate successful optimization.
  • The dynamics of quantum phase transitions are inevitably accompanied by the formation of defects when crossing a quantum critical point. For a generic class of quantum critical systems, we solve the problem of minimizing the production of defects through the use of a gradient-based deterministic optimal control algorithm. By considering a finite size quantum Ising model with a tunable global transverse field, we show that an optimal power law quench of the transverse field across the Ising critical point works well at minimizing the number of defects, in spite of being drawn from a subset of quench profiles. These power law quenches are shown to be inherently robust against noise. The optimized defect density exhibits a transition at a critical ratio of the quench duration to the system size, which we argue coincides with the intrinsic speed limit for quantum evolution.
  • This work develops measures for quantifying the effects of field noise upon targeted unitary transformations. Robustness to noise is assessed in the framework of the quantum control landscape, which is the mapping from the control to the unitary transformation performance measure (quantum gate fidelity). Within that framework, a new geometric interpretation of stochastic noise effects naturally arises, where more robust optimal controls are associated with regions of small overlap between landscape curvature and the noise correlation function. Numerical simulations of this overlap in the context of quantum information processing reveal distinct noise spectral regimes that better support robust control solutions. This perspective shows the dual importance of both noise statistics and the control form for robustness, thereby opening up new avenues of investigation on how to mitigate noise effects in quantum systems.
  • In nonrelativistic quantum mechanics, Hudsons theorem states that a Gaussian wavefunction is the only pure state corresponding to a positive Wigner function (WF). We explicitly construct non Gaussian Dirac spinors with positive relativistic WF. These pure states are coherent superpositions of particles and antiparticles, while the existence of positive WF exclusive composed of particles is conjectured. These observations challenge a common belief that states with positive WF are classical or have classical analogues, and may open new venues in relativistic quantum information.