• The Theia Collaboration: Celine Boehm, Alberto Krone-Martins, Antonio Amorim, Guillem Anglada-Escude, Alexis Brandeker, Frederic Courbin, Torsten Ensslin, Antonio Falcao, Katherine Freese, Berry Holl, Lucas Labadie, Alain Leger, Fabien Malbet, Gary Mamon, Barbara McArthur, Alcione Mora, Michael Shao, Alessandro Sozzetti, Douglas Spolyar, Eva Villaver, Conrado Albertus, Stefano Bertone, Herve Bouy, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anthony Brown, Warren Brown, Vitor Cardoso, Laurent Chemin, Riccardo Claudi, Alexandre C. M. Correia, Mariateresa Crosta, Antoine Crouzier, Francis-Yan Cyr-Racine, Mario Damasso, Antonio da Silva, Melvyn Davies, Payel Das, Pratika Dayal, Miguel de Val-Borro, Antonaldo Diaferio, Adrienne Erickcek, Malcolm Fairbairn, Morgane Fortin, Malcolm Fridlund, Paulo Garcia, Oleg Gnedin, Ariel Goobar, Paulo Gordo, Renaud Goullioud, Nigel Hambly, Nathan Hara, David Hobbs, Erik Hog, Andrew Holland, Rodrigo Ibata, Carme Jordi, Sergei Klioner, Sergei Kopeikin, Thomas Lacroix, Jacques Laskar, Christophe Le Poncin-Lafitte, Xavier Luri, Subhabrata Majumdar, Valeri Makarov, Richard Massey, Bertrand Mennesson, Daniel Michalik, Andre Moitinho de Almeida, Ana Mourao, Leonidas Moustakas, Neil Murray, Matthew Muterspaugh, Micaela Oertel, Luisa Ostorero, Angeles Perez-Garcia, Imants Platais, Jordi Portell i de Mora, Andreas Quirrenbach, Lisa Randall, Justin Read, Eniko Regos, Barnes Rory, Krzysztof Rybicki, Pat Scott, Jean Schneider, Jakub Scholtz, Arnaud Siebert, Ismael Tereno, John Tomsick, Wesley Traub, Monica Valluri, Matt Walker, Nicholas Walton, Laura Watkins, Glenn White, Dafydd Wyn Evans, Lukasz Wyrzykowski, Rosemary Wyse
    July 2, 2017 astro-ph.IM
    In the context of the ESA M5 (medium mission) call we proposed a new satellite mission, Theia, based on relative astrometry and extreme precision to study the motion of very faint objects in the Universe. Theia is primarily designed to study the local dark matter properties, the existence of Earth-like exoplanets in our nearest star systems and the physics of compact objects. Furthermore, about 15 $\%$ of the mission time was dedicated to an open observatory for the wider community to propose complementary science cases. With its unique metrology system and "point and stare" strategy, Theia's precision would have reached the sub micro-arcsecond level. This is about 1000 times better than ESA/Gaia's accuracy for the brightest objects and represents a factor 10-30 improvement for the faintest stars (depending on the exact observational program). In the version submitted to ESA, we proposed an optical (350-1000nm) on-axis TMA telescope. Due to ESA Technology readiness level, the camera's focal plane would have been made of CCD detectors but we anticipated an upgrade with CMOS detectors. Photometric measurements would have been performed during slew time and stabilisation phases needed for reaching the required astrometric precision.
  • We conducted a 12-month monitoring campaign of 33 T Tauri stars (TTS) in Taurus. Our goal was to monitor objects that possess a disk but have a weak Halpha line, a common accretion tracer for young stars, to determine whether they host a passive circumstellar disk. We used medium-resolution optical spectroscopy to assess the objects' accretion status and to measure the Halpha line. We found no convincing example of passive disks; only transition disk and debris disk systems in our sample are non-accreting. Among accretors, we find no example of flickering accretion, leading to an upper limit of 2.2% on the duty cycle of accretion gaps assuming that all accreting TTS experience such events. Combining literature results with our observations, we find that the reliability of traditional Halpha-based criteria to test for accretion is high but imperfect, particularly for low-mass TTS. We find a significant correlation between stellar mass and the full width at 10 per cent of the peak (W10%) of the Halpha line that does not seem to be related to variations in free-fall velocity. Finally, our data reveal a positive correlation between the Halpha equivalent width and its W10%, indicative of a systematic modulation in the line profile whereby the high-velocity wings of the line are proportionally more enhanced than its core when the line luminosity increases. We argue that this supports the hypothesis that the mass accretion rate on the central star is correlated with the Halpha W10% through a common physical mechanism.
  • The famous, very young, helium rich, magnetically-active, radio and X-ray emitter, short-period rotationally variable, spectroscopically peculiar star {\sigma} Ori E may have a close late-type stellar companion, which could explain flaring activity observed in some {\sigma} Ori E X-ray light curves. In 2009, Bouy et al. announced the detection of a faint companion candidate in the Ks band at 0.330 arcsec (130 AU) to the B2 Vp primary. Here, we carry out z'-band lucky imaging with AstraLux at the 2.2 m Calar Alto telescope in an attempt to constrain the properties of the companion candidate to {\sigma} Ori E. We impose a maximum mass of 2.0+0.2-0.1 Msol and an earliest spectral type of K2+/-1, which leaves the door open to a new, inexpensive, near-infrared, adaptive-optics study.
  • We present a high-precision proper motion study of 873 X-ray and spectroscopically selected stars in the massive OB association Cygnus OB2 as part of the DANCe project. These were calculated from images spanning a 15 year baseline and have typical precisions < 1 mas/yr. We calculate the velocity dispersion in the two axes to be $\sigma_\alpha(c) = 13.0^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$ and $\sigma_\delta(c) = 9.1^{+0.5}_{-0.5}$ km/s, using a 2-component, 2-dimensional model that takes into account the uncertainties on the measurements. This gives a 3-dimensional velocity dispersion of $\sigma_{3D} = 17.8 \pm 0.6$ km/s implying a virial mass significantly larger than the observed stellar mass, confirming that the association is gravitationally unbound. The association appears to be dynamically unevolved, as evidenced by considerable kinematic substructure, non-isotropic velocity dispersions and a lack of energy equipartition. The proper motions show no evidence for a global expansion pattern, with approximately the same amount of kinetic energy in expansion as there is in contraction, which argues against the association being an expanded star cluster disrupted by process such as residual gas expulsion or tidal heating. The kinematic substructures, which appear to be close to virial equilibrium and have typical masses of 40-400 M$_\odot$, also do not appear to have been affected by the expulsion of the residual gas. We conclude that Cyg OB2 was most likely born highly substructured and globally unbound, with the individual subgroups born in (or close to) virial equilibrium, and that the OB association has not experienced significant dynamical evolution since then.
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • Orion A hosts the nearest massive star factory, thus offering a unique opportunity to resolve the processes connected with the formation of both low- and high-mass stars. Here we present the most detailed and sensitive near-infrared (NIR) observations of the entire molecular cloud to date. With the unique combination of high image quality, survey coverage, and sensitivity, our NIR survey of Orion A aims at establishing a solid empirical foundation for further studies of this important cloud. In this first paper we present the observations, data reduction, and source catalog generation. To demonstrate the data quality, we present a first application of our catalog to estimate the number of stars currently forming inside Orion A and to verify the existence of a more evolved young foreground population. We used the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to survey the entire Orion A molecular cloud in the NIR $J, H$, and $K_S$ bands, covering a total of $\sim$18.3 deg$^2$. We implemented all data reduction recipes independently of the ESO pipeline. Estimates of the young populations toward Orion A are derived via the $K_S$-band luminosity function. Our catalog (799995 sources) increases the source counts compared to the Two Micron All Sky Survey by about an order of magnitude. The 90% completeness limits are 20.4, 19.9, and 19.0 mag in $J, H$, and $K_S$, respectively. The reduced images have 20% better resolution on average compared to pipeline products. We find between 2300 and 3000 embedded objects in Orion A and confirm that there is an extended foreground population above the Galactic field, in agreement with previous work. The Orion A VISTA catalog represents the most detailed NIR view of the nearest massive star-forming region and provides a fundamental basis for future studies of star formation processes toward Orion.
  • Depending on whether a T Tauri star accretes material from its circumstellar disk or not, different X-ray emission properties can be found. The accretion shocks produce cool heating of the plasma, contributing to the soft X-ray emission from the star. Using X-ray data from the Chandra Orion Ultra-deep Project and accretion rates that were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 photometric measurements in the Orion Nebula Cluster, we studied the relation between the accretion processes and the X-ray emissions of a coherent sample of T Tauri sources in the region. We performed regression and correlation analyses of our sample of T Tauri stars between the X-ray parameters, stellar properties, and the accretion measurements. We find that a clear anti-correlation is present between the residual X-ray luminosity and the accretion rates in our samples in Orion that is consistent with that found on the XMM-Newton Extended Survey of the Taurus molecular cloud (XEST) study. We provide a catalog with X-ray luminosities (corrected from distance) and accretion measurements of an Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) T Tauri stars sample. Although Orion and Taurus display strong differences in their properties (total gas and dust mass, star density, strong irradiation from massive stars), we find that a similar relation between the residual X-ray emission and accretion rate is present in the Taurus molecular cloud and in the accreting samples from the Orion Nebula Cluster. The spread in the data suggests dependencies of the accretion rates and the X-ray luminosities other than the stellar mass, but the similarity between Orion and Taurus hints at the environment not being one of them. The anti-correlation between the residual X-ray luminosity and mass accretion rate is inherent to the T Tauri stars in general, independent of their birthplace and environment, and intrinsic to early stellar evolution.
  • Context. Observations of nearby star-forming regions with the Herschel Space Observatory complement our view of the protoplanetary disks in Ophiuchus with information about the outer disks. Aims. The main goal of this project is to provide new far-infrared fluxes for the known disks in the core region of Ophiuchus and to identify potential transitional disks using data from Herschel. Methods. We obtained PACS and SPIRE photometry of previously spectroscopically confirmed young stellar objects (YSO) in the region and analysed their spectral energy distributions. Results. From an initial sample of 261 objects with spectral types in Ophiuchus, we detect 49 disks in at least one Herschel band. We provide new far-infrared fluxes for these objects. One of them is clearly a new transitional disk candidate. Conclusions. The data from Herschel Space Observatory provides fluxes that complement previous infrared data and that we use to identify a new transitional disk candidate.
  • Filamentary structures are common in molecular clouds. Explaining how they fragment to dense cores is a missing step in understanding their role in star formation. We perform a case study of whether low-mass filaments are close-to hydrostatic prior to their fragmentation, and whether their fragmentation agrees with gravitational fragmentation models. For this, we study the 6.5 pc long Musca molecular cloud that is an ideal candidate for a filament at an early stage of fragmentation. We employ dust extinction mapping in conjunction with near-infrared data from the NEWFIRM instrument, and 870 um dust continuum emission data from the LABOCA instrument, to estimate column densities. We use the data to identify fragments from the cloud and to determine the radial density distribution of its filamentary part. We compare the cloud's morphology with 13CO and C18O line emission observed with the APEX/SHeFI instrument. The Musca cloud is pronouncedly fragmented at its ends, but harbours a remarkably well-defined, 1.6 pc long filament in its Center region. The line mass of the filament is 21-31 Ms pc^-1 and FWHM 0.07 pc. Its radial profile can be fitted with a Plummer profile that has the power-index of 2.6 \pm 11%, flatter than that of an infinite hydrostatic filament. The profile can also be fitted with a hydrostatic cylinder truncated by external pressure. These models imply a central density of 5-10 x 10^4 cm^-3. The fragments in the cloud have a mean separation of 0.4 pc, in agreement with gravitational fragmentation. These properties, together with the subsonic and velocity-coherent nature of the cloud, suggest a scenario in which an initially hydrostatic cloud is currently gravitationally fragmenting. The fragmentation has started a few tenths of a Myr ago from the cloud ends, leaving its center yet relatively non-fragmented, possibly because of gravitational focusing in a finite geometry.
  • We study the dependence of protoplanetary disk evolution on stellar mass using a large sample of young stellar objects in nearby young star-forming regions. We update the protoplanetary disk fractions presented in our recent work (paper I of this series) derived for 22 nearby (< 500 pc) associations between 1 and 100 Myr. We use a subsample of 1 428 spectroscopically confirmed members to study the impact of stellar mass on protoplanetary disk evolution. We divide this sample into two stellar mass bins (2 M$_{\odot}$ boundary) and two age bins (3 Myr boundary), and use infrared excesses over the photospheric emission to classify objects in three groups: protoplanetary disks, evolved disks, and diskless. The homogeneous analysis and bias corrections allow for a statistically significant inter-comparison of the obtained results. We find robust statistical evidence of disk evolution dependence with stellar mass. Our results, combined with previous studies on disk evolution, confirm that protoplanetary disks evolve faster and/or earlier around high-mass (> 2 M$_{\odot}$) stars. We also find a roughly constant level of evolved disks throughout the whole age and stellar mass spectra. We conclude that protoplanetary disk evolution depends on stellar mass. Such a dependence could have important implications for gas giant planet formation and migration, and could contribute to explaining the apparent paucity of hot Jupiters around high-mass stars.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.
  • Dust in debris disks is produced by colliding or evaporating planetesimals, remnants of the planet formation process. Warm dust disks, known by their emission at < 24 micron, are rare (4% of FGK main sequence stars) and especially interesting because they trace material in the region likely to host terrestrial planets, where the dust has a very short dynamical lifetime. Statistical analyses of the source counts of excesses as found with the mid-IR Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) suggest that warm-dust candidates found for the Kepler transiting-planet host-star candidates can be explained by extragalactic or galactic background emission aligned by chance with the target stars. These statistical analyses do not exclude the possibility that a given WISE excess could be due to a transient dust population associated with the target. Here we report Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron follow-up observations of a sample of Kepler and non-Kepler transiting-planet candidates' host stars, with candidate WISE warm debris disks, aimed at detecting a possible cold debris disk in any of them. No clear detections were found in any one of the objects at either wavelength. Our upper limits confirm that most objects in the sample do not have a massive debris disk like that in beta Pic. We also show that the planet-hosting star WASP-33 does not have a debris disk comparable to the one around eta Crv. Although the data cannot be used to rule out rare warm disks around the Kepler planet-hosting candidates, the lack of detections and the characteristics of neighboring emission found at far-IR wavelengths support an earlier result suggesting that most of the WISE-selected IR excesses around Kepler candidate host stars are likely due to either chance alignment with background IR-bright galaxies and/or to interstellar emission.
  • We report on Submillimeter Array observations of the 870 micron continuum and CO(3-2), 13CO(2-1) and C18O(2-1) line emission of a faint object, SMM2E, near the driving source of the HH797 outflow in the IC348 cluster. The continuum emission shows an unresolved source for which we estimate a mass of gas and dust of 30 Mjup, and the CO(3-2) line reveals a compact bipolar outflow centred on SMM2E, and barely seen also in 13CO(2-1). In addition, C18O(2-1) emission reveals hints of a possible rotating envelope/disk perpendicular to the outflow, for which we infer a dynamical mass of ~16 Mjup. In order to further constrain the accreted mass of the object, we gathered data from Spitzer, Herschel, and new and archive submillimetre observations, and built the Spectral Energy Distribution (SED). The SED can be fitted with one single modified black-body from 70 micron down to 2.1 cm, using a dust temperature of ~24 K, a dust emissivity index of 0.8, and an envelope mass of ~35 Mjup. The bolometric luminosity is 0.10 Lsun, and the bolometric temperature is 35 K. Thus, SMM2E is comparable to the known Class 0 objects in the stellar domain. An estimate of the final mass indicates that SMM2E will most likely remain substellar, and the SMM2E outflow force matches the trend with luminosity known for young stellar objects. Thus, SMM2E constitutes an excellent example of a Class 0 proto-brown dwarf candidate which forms as a scaled-down version of low-mass stars. Finally, SMM2E seems to be part of a wide (~2400 AU) multiple system of Class 0 sources.
  • We present the results of a galaxy-wide study of molecular gas and star formation in a sample of 76 HII regions in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 300. We have measured the molecular gas at 250 pc scales using pointed CO(J=2-1) observations with the APEX telescope. We detect CO in 42 of our targets, deriving molecular gas masses ranging from our sensitivity limit of ~10^5 Msun to 7x10^5 Msun. We find a clear decline in the CO detection rate with galactocentric distance, which we attribute primarily to the decreasing radial metallicity gradient in NGC 300. We combine GALEX FUV, Spitzer 24 micron, and H-alpha narrowband imaging to measure the star formation activity in our sample. We have developed a new direct modeling approach for computing star formation rates that utilizes these data and population synthesis models to derive the masses and ages of the young stellar clusters associated with each of our HII region targets. We find a characteristic gas depletion time of 230 Myr at 250 pc scales in NGC 300, more similar to the results obtained for Milky Way Giant Molecular Clouds than the longer (>2 Gyr) global depletion times derived for entire galaxies and kpc-sized regions within them. This difference is partially due to the fact that our study accounts for only the gas and stars within the youngest star forming regions. We also note a large scatter in the NGC 300 SFR-molecular gas mass scaling relation that is furthermore consistent with the Milky Way cloud results. This scatter likely represents real differences in giant molecular cloud physical properties such as the dense gas fraction.
  • We present high-resolution, high dynamic range column-density and color-temperature maps of the Orion complex using a combination of Planck dust-emission maps, Herschel dust-emission maps, and 2MASS NIR dust-extinction maps. The column-density maps combine the robustness of the 2MASS NIR extinction maps with the resolution and coverage of the Herschel and Planck dust-emission maps and constitute the highest dynamic range column-density maps ever constructed for the entire Orion complex, covering $0.01 \, \mathrm{mag} < A_K < 30 \,\mathrm{mag}$, or $2 \times 10^{20} \, \mathrm{cm}^{-2} < N < 5 \times 10^{23} \,\mathrm{cm}^{-2}$. We determined the ratio of the 2.2 microns extinction coefficient to the 850 microns opacity and found that the values obtained for both Orion A and B are significantly lower than the predictions of standard dust models, but agree with newer models that incorporate icy silicate-graphite conglomerates for the grain population. We show that the cloud projected pdf, over a large range of column densities, can be well fitted by a simple power law. Moreover, we considered the local Schmidt-law for star formation, and confirm earlier results, showing that the protostar surface density $\Sigma_*$ follows a simple law $\Sigma_* \propto \Sigma_{gas}^\beta$, with $\beta \sim 2$.
  • We study the evolution of circumstellar disks in 22 young (1 to 100 Myr) nearby (within 500 pc) associations over the entire mass spectrum using photometry covering from the optical to the mid-infrared. We compiled a catalog of 2340 spectroscopically-confirmed members of these nearby associations. We analyzed their spectral energy distributions and searched for excess related to the presence of protoplanetary disks in a homogeneous way. Sensitivity limits and spatial completeness were also considered. We derive disk fractions as probed by mid-infrared excess in these regions. The unprecedented size of our sample allows us to confirm the timescale of disk decay reported in the literature and to find new trends. The fraction of excess sources increases systematically if measured at longer wavelengths. Disk percentages derived using different wavelength ranges should therefore be compared with caution. The dust probed at 22-24 um evolves slower than that probed at shorter wavelengths (3.4-12 um). Assuming an exponential decay, we derive a timescale tau=4.2-5.8 Myr at 22-24 um for primordial disks, compared to 2-3 Myr at shorter wavelength (3.4-12 um). Primordial disks disappear around 10 Myr, matching in time a brief increase of the number of 'evolved' disks. The increase in timescale of excess decay at longer wavelength is compatible with inside-out disk clearing scenarios. The increased timescale of decay and larger dispersion in the distribution of disk fractions at 22-24 um suggest that the inner and outer zones evolve differently, the latter potentially following a variety of evolutionary paths. The drop of primordial disks and the coincident rise of evolved disks at 10 Myr are compatible with planet formation theories suggesting that the disappearance of the gas is immediately followed by the dynamical stirring of the disk.
  • AA Tau has been monitored for more than 20 years since 1987, exhibiting a nearly constant brightness level of V=12.5 mag. We report here that in 2011 it suddenly faded away, becoming 2 magnitudes fainter in the V-band, and has remained in this deep state since then. We report new optical and near-IR photometry and spectroscopy obtained during the fading event. The system appears much redder and fainter than it was in the bright state. Also, the 8.2d photometric period continuously observed for more than 20 years is not seen during most of the deep state. The analysis of the system's brightness and colors suggests that the visual extinction on the line of sight has increased by about 3-4 magnitudes in the deep state. At optical wavelengths, the system appears to be dominated by scattered light, probably originating from the upper surface layers of a highly inclined circumstellar disk. The profiles of the Balmer lines have significantly changed as well, with the disappearance of a central absorption component regularly observed in the bright state. We ascribe this change to the scattering of the system's spectrum by circumstellar dust. Noticeably, the mass accretion rate in the inner disk and onto the central star has not changed as the system faded away. We conclude that the deepening of the AA Tau system is due to a sudden increase of circumstellar dust extinction on the line of sight without concomitant change in the accretion rate. We suggest that the enhanced obscuration may be produced by a non-axisymmetric overdense region in the disk, located at a distance of 7.7 AU or more, that was recently brought on the line of sight by its keplerian motion around the central star.
  • We present 3-dimensional kinematical observations of the massive OB association Cygnus OB2 to identify the mechanisms responsible for disrupting young star clusters. The picture revealed by these observations is of a highly-substructured, dynamically unmixed OB association that does not exhibit the position-velocity correlations predicted by the theories of infant mortality or tidal stripping. These observations would appear to support a picture of hierarchical star formation.
  • We have bandmerged candidate transiting planetary systems (from the Kepler satellite) and confirmed transiting planetary systems (from the literature) with the recent Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) preliminary release catalog. We have found 13 stars showing infrared excesses at either 12 and/or 22 microns. Without longer wavelength observations it is not possible to conclusively determine the nature of the excesses, although we argue that they are likely due to debris disks around the stars. If confirmed, our sample ~ doubles the number of currently known warm excess disks around old main sequence stars. The ratios between the measured fluxes and the stellar photospheres are generally larger than expected for Gyr-old stars, such as these planetary hosts. Assuming temperature limits for the dust and emission from large dust particles, we derive estimates for the disk radii. These values are comparable to the planet's semi-major axis, suggesting that the planets may be stirring the planetesimals in the system.
  • The recent discovery of a transiting planet around WASP-33, the misalignment of the stellar rotation axis and the planet orbit, the possible existence of an additional planet in the system, and the presence of $\delta$ Scuti pulsations in the hosting star make this system a highly interesting object to help us understand the origin and evolution of giant planets orbiting very close a star. High spatial resolution imaging allows the study of the presence of the predicted additional planet, and any other objects, constraining the possible formation scenarios of the system. In November 2010, we recorded high spatial resolution images from 1 to 2.5 $\mu$m using the W.M. 10m-Keck II telescope and its adaptive optics system, obtaining broad (Jc,Hc, and Kc) and narrow band (FeII) images of the system. After data reduction, the contrast and angular resolution provided by this instrument allowed us to constraint the multiplicity of this system and to detect one potential companion. We have found a new object at a distance of 1.961$"$ $\pm$ 0.003$"$ from the WASP-33, with a position angle of 276.32$\pm$0.24 deg. It could be a dwarf star/ brown dwarf or an extragalactic object. In the first case, and assuming the same distance from the Sun, the object is 227 AU from the central star. On the other hand, no additional objects have been found. This constraints the possible objects in the system, depending on its age and masses. A potential companion object to WASP-33 was obtained. The gravitational link must be confirmed, but this object could influence the evolution of the planetary system depending on its orbital eccentricity. We have ruled-out the existence of additional objects, depending on the age of the system.
  • Aims. We aim at detecting the presence of companions inside the inner hole/gap region of a sample of five well known transitional disks using spatially-resolved imaging in the near-IR with the VLT/NACO/S13 camera, which probes projected distances from the primary of typically 0.1 to 7 arcsec. The sample includes the stars DoAr 21, HD 135344B (SAO 206462), HR 4796A, T Cha, and TW Hya, spanning ages of less than 1 to 10 Myr, spectral types of A0 to K7, and hole/gap outer radii of 4 to 100 AU. Methods. In order to enhance the contrast and to avoid saturation at the core of the point-spread function (PSF), we use narrow-band filters at 1.75 and 2.12 {\mu}m. The "locally optimized combination of images" (LOCI) algorithm is applied for an optimal speckle noise removal and PSF subtraction, providing an increase of 0.5-1.5 mag in contrast over the classic method. Results. With the proviso that we could have missed companions owing to unfavorable projections, the VLT/NACO observations rule out the presence of unresolved companions down to an inner radius of about 0".1 from the primary in all five transitional disks and with a detection limit of 2 to 5 mag in contrast. In the disk outer regions the detection limits typically reach 8 to 9 mag in contrast and 4.7 mag for T Cha. Hence, the NACO images resolve part of the inner hole/gap region of all disks with the exception of TW Hya, for which the inner hole is only 4 AU. The 5{\sigma} sensitivity profiles, together with a selected evolutionary model, allow to discard stellar companions within the inner hole/gap region of T Cha, and down to the substellar regime for HD 135344B and HR 4796A. DoAr 21 is the only object from the sample of five disks for which the NACO images are sensitive enough for a detection of objects less massive than \sim 13 MJup that is, potential giant planets or low-mass brown dwarfs at radii larger than \sim 76 AU (0".63).
  • We present near-infrared spectral measurements of Themis family asteroid (379) Huenna (D~98 km) and its 6 km satellite using SpeX on the NASA IRTF. The companion was farther than 1.5" from the primary at the time of observations and was approximately 5 magnitudes dimmer. We describe a method for separating and extracting the signal of a companion asteroid when the signal is not entirely resolved from the primary. The spectrum of (379) Huenna has a broad, shallow feature near 1 {\mu}m and a low slope, characteristic of C-type asteroids. The secondary's spectrum is consistent with the taxonomic classification of C-complex or X-complex. The quality of the data was not sufficient to identify any subtle feature in the secondary's spectrum.
  • The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectro- scopically identified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow, however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here we present adaptive optics (AO) assisted [FeII] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to '' be driving a ~ 0.4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008 (Grankin & Artemenko 2009). Indeed the dy- namical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a time-scale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the time-scale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.
  • Proper motion measurements of the cool and ultracool populations in the Upper Scorpius OB association are crucial to confirm membership and to identify possible run-away objects. We cross-match samples of photometrically selected and spectroscopically confirmed cool and ultracool (K5<SpT<M8.5) candidate members in the Upper Scorpius OB association using the literature and the USNO-B and the UCAC2 catalogues. 251 of these objects have a USNO-B and/or UCAC2 counterpart with proper motion measurements. A significant fraction (19 objects, 7.6+-1.8%) of spectroscopically confirmed young objects show discrepant proper motion. They must either belong to unidentified coincident foreground associations, or originate from neighboring star forming regions or have recently experienced dynamical interactions within the association. The observed accretor and disc frequencies are lower among outliers, but with only 19 objects it is unreliable to draw firm statistical conclusions. Finally, we note that transverse velocities of very low mass members are indistinguishable from those of low mass members within 4km/s
  • We present resolved NACO photometry of the close binary AB Dor B in H- and Ks-band. AB Dor B is itself known to be a wide binary companion to AB Dor A, which in turn has a very low-mass close companion named AB Dor C. These four known components make up the young and dynamically interesting system AB Dor, which will likely become a benchmark system for calibrating theoretical pre-main sequence evolutionary mass tracks for low-mass stars. However, for this purpose the actual age has to be known, and this subject has been a matter of discussion in the recent scientific literature. We compare our resolved photometry of AB Dor Ba and Bb with theoretical and empirical isochrones in order to constrain the age of the system. This leads to an age estimate of about 50 to 100 Myr. We discuss the implications of such an age range for the case of AB Dor C, and compare with other results in the literature.