• Quantum computers promise ultrafast performance of certain tasks. Experimentally appealing, measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) requires an entangled resource called a cluster state, with long computations requiring large cluster states. Previously, the largest cluster state consisted of 8 photonic qubits or light modes, while the largest multipartite entangled state of any sort involved 14 trapped ions. These implementations involve quantum entities separated in space, and in general, each experimental apparatus is used only once. Here, we circumvent this inherent inefficiency by multiplexing light modes in the time domain. We deterministically generate and fully characterise a continuous-variable cluster state containing more than 10,000 entangled modes. This is, by 3 orders of magnitude, the largest entangled state ever created to date. The entangled modes are individually addressable wavepackets of light in two beams. Furthermore, we present an efficient scheme for MBQC on this cluster state based on sequential applications of quantum teleportation.
  • Frequency multiplexing allows us to encode multiple quantum states on a single light beam. Successful multiplexing of Gaussian and non-Gaussian states potentially leads to scalable quantum computing or communication. Here we create an optical Schr\"odinger's cat state at a 500.6MHz sideband, as a first step to non-Gaussian, frequency-division multiplexed photonic quantum information processing. The central idea is to use phase modulation as a frequency sideband beamsplitter in the photon subtraction scheme, where a small portion of the sideband mode is downconverted to the carrier frequency to provide a trigger photon heralding the generation of a Schr\"odinger's cat state. The reconstructed Wigner function of the cat state from a direct measurement of the 500MHz sideband modes shows the negativity of $W(0,0) = -0.088\pm0.001$ without any corrections.
  • Integrated quantum photonics provides a scalable platform for the generation, manipulation, and detection of optical quantum states by confining light inside miniaturized waveguide circuits. Here we show the generation, manipulation, and interferometric stage of homodyne detection of non-classical light on a single device, a key step towards a fully integrated approach to quantum information with continuous variables. We use a dynamically reconfigurable lithium niobate waveguide network to generate and characterize squeezed vacuum and two-mode entangled states, key resources for several quantum communication and computing protocols. We measure a squeezing level of -1.38+-0.04 dB and demonstrate entanglement by verifying an inseparability criterion I=0.77+-0.02<1. Our platform can implement all the processes required for optical quantum technology and its high nonlinearity and fast reconfigurability makes it ideal for the realization of quantum computation with time encoded continuous variable cluster states.
  • The identification of an unknown quantum gate is a significant issue in quantum technology. In this paper, we propose a quantum gate identification method within the framework of quantum process tomography. In this method, a series of pure states are inputted to the gate and then a fast state tomography on the output states is performed and the data are used to reconstruct the quantum gate. Our algorithm has computational complexity $O(d^3)$ with the system dimension $d$. The algorithm is compared with maximum likelihood estimation method for the running time, which shows the efficiency advantage of our method. An error upper bound is established for the identification algorithm and the robustness of the algorithm against the purity of input states is also tested. We perform quantum optical experiment on single-qubit Hadamard gate to verify the effectiveness of the identification algorithm.
  • Entangled measurement is a crucial tool in quantum technology. We propose a new entanglement measure of multi-mode detection, which estimates the amount of entanglement that can be created in a measurement. To illustrate the proposed measure, we perform quantum tomography of a two-mode detector that is comprised of two superconducting nanowire single photon detectors. Our method utilizes coherent states as probe states, which can be easily prepared with accuracy. Our work shows that a separable state such as a coherent state is enough to characterize a potentially entangled detector. We investigate the entangling capability of the detector in various settings. Our proposed measure verifies that the detector makes an entangled measurement under certain conditions, and reveals the nature of the entangling properties of the detector. Since the precise characterization of a detector is essential for applications in quantum information technology, the experimental reconstruction of detector properties along with the proposed measure will be key features in future quantum information processing.
  • Precise knowledge of an optical device's frequency response is crucial for it to be useful in most applications. Traditional methods for determining the frequency response of an optical system (e.g. optical cavity or waveguide modulator) usually rely on calibrated broadband photo-detectors or complicated RF mixdown operations. As the bandwidths of these devices continue to increase, there is a growing need for a characterization method that does not have bandwidth limitations, or require a previously calibrated device. We demonstrate a new calibration technique on an optical system (consisting of an optical cavity and a high-speed waveguide modulator) that is free from limitations imposed by detector bandwidth, and does not require a calibrated photo-detector or modulator. We use a low-frequency (DC) photo-detector to monitor the cavity's optical response as a function of modulation frequency, which is also used to determine the modulator's frequency response. Knowledge of the frequency-dependent modulation depth allows us to more precisely determine the cavity's characteristics (free spectral range and linewidth). The precision and repeatability of our technique is demonstrated by measuring the different resonant frequencies of orthogonal polarization cavity modes caused by the presence of a non-linear crystal. Once the modulator has been characterized using this simple method, the frequency response of any passive optical element can be determined.
  • Quantum Hamiltonian identification is important for characterizing the dynamics of quantum systems, calibrating quantum devices and achieving precise quantum control. In this paper, an effective two-step optimization (TSO) quantum Hamiltonian identification algorithm is developed within the framework of quantum process tomography. In the identification method, different probe states are inputted into quantum systems and the output states are estimated using the quantum state tomography protocol via linear regression estimation. The time-independent system Hamiltonian is reconstructed based on the experimental data for the output states. The Hamiltonian identification method has computational complexity O(d^6) where d is the dimension of the system Hamiltonian. An error upper bound O(d^3/N^(1/2))$ is also established, where N is the resource number for the tomography of each output state, and several numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed TSO Hamiltonian identification method.
  • Real-time controls based on quantum measurements are powerful tools for various quantum protocols. However, their experimental realization have been limited by mode-mismatch between temporal mode of quadrature measurement and that heralded by photon detection. Here, we demonstrate real-time quadrature measurement of a single-photon wavepacket induced by a photon detection, by utilizing continuous temporal-mode-matching between homodyne detection and an exponentially rising temporal mode. Single photons in exponentially rising modes are also expected to be useful resources for interactions with other quantum systems.
  • Measuring the power spectral density of a stochastic process, such as a stochastic force or magnetic field, is a fundamental task in many sensing applications. Quantum noise is becoming a major limiting factor to such a task in future technology, especially in optomechanics for temperature, stochastic gravitational wave, and decoherence measurements. Motivated by this concern, here we prove a measurement-independent quantum limit to the accuracy of estimating the spectrum parameters of a classical stochastic process coupled to a quantum dynamical system. We demonstrate our results by analyzing the data from a continuous optical phase estimation experiment and showing that the experimental performance with homodyne detection is close to the quantum limit. We further propose a spectral photon counting method that can attain quantum-optimal performance for weak modulation and a coherent-state input, with an error scaling superior to that of homodyne detection at low signal-to-noise ratios.
  • We present a concept of non-Gaussian measurement composed of a non-Gaussian ancillary state, linear optics and adaptive heterodyne measurement, and on the basis of this we also propose a simple scheme of implementing a quantum cubic gate on a traveling light beam. In analysis of the cubic gate in the Heisenberg representation, we find that nonlinearity of the gate is independent from nonclassicality; the nonlinearity is generated solely by a classical nonlinear adaptive control in a measurement-and-feedforward process while the nonclassicality is attached by the non-Gaussian ancilla that suppresses excess noise in the output. By exploiting the noise term as a figure of merit, we consider the optimum non-Gaussian ancilla that can be prepared within reach of current technologies and discuss performance of the gate. It is a crucial step towards experimental implementation of the quantum cubic gate.
  • Squeezing is a nonlinear Gaussian operation that is the key component in construction of other nonlinear Gaussian gates. In our implementation of the squeezing gate, the amount and the orientation of the squeezing can be controlled by an external driving signal with 1 MHz operational bandwidth. This opens a brand new area of dynamic Gaussian processing. In particular, the gate can be immediately employed as the feed-forward needed for the deterministic implementation of the quantum cubic gate, which is a key piece of universal quantum information processing.
  • We present a general formalism to describe continuous-variable (CV) quantum teleportation of discrete-variable (DV) states with gain tuning, taking into account experimental imperfections. Here the teleportation output is given by independently transforming each density matrix element of the initial state. This formalism allows us to accurately model various teleportation experiments and to analyze the gain dependence of their respective figures of merit. We apply our formalism to the recent experiment of CV teleportation of qubits [S. Takeda et al., Nature 500, 315 (2013)] and investigate the optimal gain for the transfer fidelity. We also propose and model an experiment for CV teleportation of DV entanglement. It is shown that, provided the experimental losses are within a certain range, DV entanglement can be teleported for any non-zero squeezing by optimally tuning the gain.
  • Unitary non-Gaussian nonlinearity is one of the key components required for quantum computation and other developing applications of quantum information processing. Sufficient operation of this kind is still not available, but it can be approximatively implemented with help of a specifically engineered resource state constructed from individual photons. We present experimental realization and thorough analysis of such quantum resource state, and confirm that the state does indeed possess properties of a state produced by unitary dynamics driven by cubic nonlinearity.
  • We experimentally demonstrate optomechanical motion and force measurements near the quantum precision limits set by the quantum Cram\'er-Rao bounds (QCRBs). Optical beams in coherent and phase-squeezed states are used to measure the motion of a mirror under an external stochastic force. Utilizing optical phase tracking and quantum smoothing techniques, we achieve position, momentum, and force estimation accuracies close to the QCRBs with the coherent state, while estimation using squeezed states shows clear quantum enhancements beyond the coherent-state bounds.
  • We develop an experimental scheme based on a continuous-wave (cw) laser for generating arbitrary superpositions of photon number states. In this experiment, we successfully generate superposition states of zero to three photons, namely advanced versions of superpositions of two and three coherent states. They are fully compatible with developed quantum teleportation and measurement-based quantum operations with cw lasers. Due to achieved high detection efficiency, we observe, without any loss correction, multiple areas of negativity of Wigner function, which confirm strongly nonclassical nature of the generated states.
  • We experimentally generate arbitrary time-bin qubits using continuous-wave light. The advantage unique to our qubit is its compatibility with deterministic continuous-variable quantum information processing. This compatibility comes from its optical coherence with continuous waves, well-defined spatio-temporal mode, and frequency spectrum within the operational bandwidth of the current continuous-variable technology. We also demonstrate an efficient scheme to characterize time-bin qubits via eight-port homodyne measurement. This enables the complete characterization of the qubits as two-mode states, as well as a flexible analysis equivalent to the conventional scheme based on a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and photon-detection.
  • Coherent feedback is a non-measurement based, hence a back-action free, method of control for quantum systems. A typical application of this control scheme is squeezing enhancement, a purely non-classical effect in quantum optics. In this paper we report its first experimental demonstration that well agrees with the theory taking into account time delays and losses in the coherent feedback loop. The results clarify both the benefit and the limitation of coherent feedback control in a practical situation.
  • Tracking a randomly varying optical phase is a key task in metrology, with applications in optical communication. The best precision for optical phase tracking has till now been limited by the quantum vacuum fluctuations of coherent light. Here we surpass this coherent-state limit by using a continuous-wave beam in a phase-squeezed quantum state. Unlike in previous squeezing-enhanced metrology, restricted to phases with very small variation, the best tracking precision (for a fixed light intensity) is achieved for a finite degree of squeezing, due to Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. By optimizing the squeezing we track the phase with a mean square error 15 \pm 4 % below the coherent-state limit.
  • We generate squeezed state of light at 860 nm with a monolithic optical parametric oscillator. The optical parametric oscillator consists of a periodically poled KTiOPO_4 crystal, both ends of which are spherically polished and mirror-coated. We achieve both phase matching and cavity resonance by controlling only the temperature of the crystal. We observe up to -8.0 dB of squeezing with the bandwidth of 142 MHz. Our technique makes it possible to drive many monolithic cavities simultaneously by a single laser. Hence our monolithic optical parametric oscillator is quite suitable to continuous-variable quantum information experiments where we need a large number of highly squeezed light beams.
  • We investigate experiments of continuous-variable quantum information processing based on the teleportation scheme. Quantum teleportation, which is realized by a two-mode squeezed vacuum state and measurement-and-feedforward, is considered as an elementary quantum circuit as well as quantum communication. By modifying ancilla states or measurement-and-feedforwards, we can realize various quantum circuits which suffice for universal quantum computation. In order to realize the teleportation-based computation we improve the level of squeezing, and fidelity of teleportation. With a high-fidelity teleporter we demonstrate some advanced teleportation experiments, i.e., teleportation of a squeezed state and sequential teleportation of a coherent state. Moreover, as an example of the teleportation-based computation, we build a QND interaction gate which is a continuous-variable analog of a CNOT gate. A QND interaction gate is constructed only with ancillary squeezed vacuum states and measurement-and-feedforwards. We also create continuous-variable four mode cluster type entanglement for further application, namely, one-way quantum computation.
  • We demonstrate an unconditional high-fidelity teleporter capable of preserving the broadband entanglement in an optical squeezed state. In particular, we teleport a squeezed state of light and observe $-0.8 \pm 0.2$dB of squeezing in the teleported (output) state. We show that the squeezing criterion translates directly into a sufficient criterion for entanglement of the upper and lower sidebands of the optical field. Thus, this result demonstrates the first unconditional teleportation of broadband entanglement. Our teleporter achieves sufficiently high fidelity to allow the teleportation to be cascaded, enabling, in principle, the construction of deterministic non-Gaussian operations.
  • We demonstrate a sequence of two quantum teleportations of optical coherent states, combining two high-fidelity teleporters for continuous variables. In our experiment, the individual teleportation fidelities are evaluated as F_1 = 0.70 \pm 0.02 and F_2 = 0.75 \pm 0.02, while the fidelity between the input and the sequentially teleported states is determined as F^{(2)} = 0.57 \pm 0.02. This still exceeds the optimal fidelity of one half for classical teleportation of arbitrary coherent states and almost attains the value of the first (unsequential) quantum teleportation experiment with optical coherent states.
  • We witness experimentally the presence of macroscopic coherence in Gaussian quantum states using a recently proposed criterion (E.G. Cavalcanti and M. Reid, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 170405 (2006)). The macroscopic coherence stems from interference between macroscopically distinct states in phase space and we prove experimentally that even the vacuum state contains these features with a distance in phase space of $0.51\pm0.02$ shot noise units (SNU). For squeezed states we found macroscopic superpositions with a distance of up to $0.83\pm0.02$ SNU. The proof of macroscopic quantum coherence was investigated with respect to squeezing and purity of the states.
  • We observe -9.01$\pm$0.14 dB of squeezing and +15.12$\pm$0.14 dB of antisqueezing with a local oscillator phase locked in homodyne measurement. In reference [1], two main factors are pointed out which degrade the observed squeezing level: phase fluctuation in homodyne measurement and intracavity losses of an optical parametric oscillator for squeezing. We have improved the phase stability of homodyne measurement and have reduced the intracavity losses. We measure pump power dependences of the squeezing and antisqueezing levels, which show good agreement with theoretical calculations taking account of the phase fluctuation.
  • We observed -7.2 dB quadrature squeezing at 860 nm by using a sub-threshold continuous-wave pumped optical parametric oscillator with a periodically-poled KTiOPO4 crystal as a nonlinear optical medium. The squeezing level was measured with the phase of homodyne detection locked at the quadrature. The blue light induced infrared absorption was not observed in the experiment.