• We apply the phase-reduction analysis to examine synchronization properties of periodic fluid flows. The dynamics of unsteady flows are described in terms of the phase dynamics reducing the high-dimensional fluid flow to its single scalar phase variable. We characterize the phase response to impulse perturbations, which can in turn quantify the influence of periodic perturbations on the unsteady flow. These insights from the phase-based analysis uncover the condition for synchronization. In the present work, we study as an example the influence of periodic external forcing on unsteady cylinder wake. The condition for synchronization is identified and agrees closely with results from direct numerical simulations. Moreover, the analysis reveals the optimal forcing direction for synchronization. The phase-response analysis holds potential to uncover lock-on characteristics for a range of periodic flows.
  • A general phase reduction method for a network of coupled dynamical elements exhibiting collective oscillations, which is applicable to arbitrary networks of heterogeneous dynamical elements, is developed. A set of coupled adjoint equations for phase sensitivity functions, which characterize phase response of the collective oscillation to small perturbations applied to individual elements, is derived. Using the phase sensitivity functions, collective oscillation of the network under weak perturbation can be described approximately by a one-dimensional phase equation. As an example, mutual synchronization between a pair of collectively oscillating networks of excitable and oscillatory FitzHugh-Nagumo elements with random coupling is studied.
  • We consider optimization of linear stability of synchronized states between a pair of weakly coupled limit-cycle oscillators with cross coupling, where different components of state variables of the oscillators are allowed to interact. On the basis of the phase reduction theory, the coupling matrix between different components of the oscillator states that maximizes the linear stability of the synchronized state under given constraints on overall coupling intensity and on stationary phase difference is derived. The improvement in the linear stability is illustrated by using several types of limit-cycle oscillators as examples.
  • Optimization of the stability of synchronized states between a pair of symmetrically coupled reaction-diffusion systems exhibiting rhythmic spatiotemporal patterns is studied in the framework of the phase reduction theory. The optimal linear filter that maximizes the linear stability of the in-phase synchronized state is derived for the case where the two systems are linearly coupled. The nonlinear optimal interaction function that theoretically gives the largest linear stability of the in-phase synchronized state is also derived. The theory is illustrated by using typical rhythmic patterns in FitzHugh-Nagumo systems as examples.
  • Systems of dynamical elements exhibiting spontaneous rhythms are found in various fields of science and engineering, including physics, chemistry, biology, physiology, and mechanical and electrical engineering. Such dynamical elements are often modeled as nonlinear limit-cycle oscillators. In this article, we briefly review phase reduction theory, which is a simple and powerful method for analyzing the synchronization properties of limit-cycle oscillators exhibiting rhythmic dynamics. Through phase reduction theory, we can systematically simplify the nonlinear multi-dimensional differential equations describing a limit-cycle oscillator to a one-dimensional phase equation, which is much easier to analyze. Classical applications of this theory, i.e., the phase locking of an oscillator to a periodic external forcing and the mutual synchronization of interacting oscillators, are explained. Further, more recent applications of this theory to the synchronization of non-interacting oscillators induced by common noise and the dynamics of coupled oscillators on complex networks are discussed. We also comment on some recent advances in phase reduction theory for noise-driven oscillators and rhythmic spatiotemporal patterns.
  • Phase reduction framework for limit-cycling systems based on isochrons has been used as a powerful tool for analyzing rhythmic phenomena. Recently, the notion of isostables, which complements the isochrons by characterizing amplitudes of the system state, i.e., deviations from the limit-cycle attractor, has been introduced to describe transient dynamics around the limit cycle [Wilson and Moehlis, Phys. Rev. E 94, 052213 (2016)]. In this study, we introduce a framework for a reduced phase-amplitude description of transient dynamics of stable limit-cycling systems. In contrast to the preceding study, the isostables are treated in a fully consistent way with the Koopman operator analysis, which enables us to avoid discontinuities of the isostables and to apply the framework to system states far from the limit cycle. We also propose a new, convenient bi-orthogonalization method to obtain the response functions of the amplitudes, which can be interpreted as an extension of the adjoint covariant Lyapunov vector to transient dynamics in limit-cycling systems. We illustrate the utility of the proposed reduction framework by estimating optimal injection timing of external input that efficiently suppresses deviations of the system state from the limit cycle in a model of a biochemical oscillator.
  • Hybrid dynamical systems characterized by discrete switching of smooth dynamics have been used to model various rhythmic phenomena. However, the phase reduction theory, a fundamental framework for analyzing the synchronization of limit-cycle oscillations in rhythmic systems, has mostly been restricted to smooth dynamical systems. Here we develop a general phase reduction theory for weakly perturbed limit cycles in hybrid dynamical systems that facilitates analysis, control, and optimization of nonlinear oscillators whose smooth models are unavailable or intractable. On the basis of the generalized theory, we analyze injection locking of hybrid limit-cycle oscillators by periodic forcing and reveal their characteristic synchronization properties, such as ultrafast and robust entrainment to the periodic forcing and logarithmic scaling at the synchronization transition. We also illustrate the theory by analyzing the synchronization dynamics of a simple physical model of biped locomotion.
  • The phase reduction method is a dimension reduction method for weakly driven limit-cycle oscillators, which has played an important role in the theoretical analysis of synchro- nization phenomena. Recently, we proposed a generalization of the phase reduction method [W. Kurebayashi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 2013]. This generalized phase reduction method can robustly predict the dynamics of strongly driven oscillators, for which the conventional phase reduction method fails. In this generalized method, the external input to the oscillator should be properly decomposed into a slowly varying component and remaining weak fluctua- tions. In this paper, we propose a simple criterion for timescale decomposition of the external input, which gives accurate prediction of the phase dynamics and enables us to systematically apply the generalized phase reduction method to a general class of limit-cycle oscillators. The validity of the criterion is confirmed by numerical simulations.
  • We propose a method for controlling synchronization patterns of limit-cycle oscillators by common noisy inputs, i.e., by utilizing noise-induced synchronization. Various synchronization patterns, including fully synchronized and clustered states, can be realized by using linear filters that generate appropriate common noisy signals from given noise. The optimal linear filter can be determined from the linear phase response property of the oscillators and the power spectrum of the given noise. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by numerical simulations.
  • Reaction-diffusion systems can describe a wide class of rhythmic spatiotemporal patterns observed in chemical and biological systems, such as circulating pulses on a ring, oscillating spots, target waves, and rotating spirals. These rhythmic dynamics can be considered limit cycles of reaction-diffusion systems. However, the conventional phase-reduction theory, which provides a simple unified framework for analyzing synchronization properties of limit-cycle oscillators subjected to weak forcing, has mostly been restricted to low-dimensional dynamical systems. Here, we develop a phase-reduction theory for stable limit-cycle solutions of infinite-dimensional reaction-diffusion systems. By generalizing the notion of isochrons to functional space, the phase sensitivity function - a fundamental quantity for phase reduction - is derived. For illustration, several rhythmic dynamics of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of excitable media are considered. Nontrivial phase response properties and synchronization dynamics are revealed, reflecting their complex spatiotemporal organization. Our theory will provide a general basis for the analysis and control of spatiotemporal rhythms in various reaction-diffusion systems.
  • We formulate a theory for the phase description of oscillatory convection in a cylindrical Hele-Shaw cell that is laterally periodic. This system possesses spatial translational symmetry in the lateral direction owing to the cylindrical shape as well as temporal translational symmetry. Oscillatory convection in this system is described by a limit-torus solution that possesses two phase modes; one is a spatial phase and the other is a temporal phase. The spatial and temporal phases indicate the position and oscillation of the convection, respectively. The theory developed in this paper can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-torus solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, limit-torus solutions to partial differential equations representing oscillatory convection with a spatially translational mode. We derive the phase sensitivity functions for spatial and temporal phases; these functions quantify the phase responses of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point. Using the phase sensitivity functions, we characterize the spatiotemporal phase responses of oscillatory convection to weak spatial stimuli and analyze the spatiotemporal phase synchronization between weakly coupled systems of oscillatory convection.
  • We investigate common-noise-induced phase synchronization between uncoupled identical Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection. Using the phase description method for oscillatory convection, we demonstrate that the uncoupled systems of oscillatory Hele-Shaw convection can exhibit in-phase synchronization when driven by weak common noise. We derive the Lyapunov exponent determining the relaxation time for the synchronization, and develop a method for obtaining the optimal spatial pattern of the common noise to achieve synchronization. The theoretical results are confirmed by direct numerical simulations.
  • The phase reduction method for limit cycle oscillators subjected to weak perturbations has significantly contributed to theoretical investigations of rhythmic phenomena. We here propose a generalized phase reduction method that is also applicable to strongly perturbed limit cycle oscillators. The fundamental assumption of our method is that the perturbations can be decomposed into a slowly varying component as compared to the amplitude relaxation time and remaining weak fluctuations. Under this assumption, we introduce a generalized phase parameterized by the slowly varying component and derive a closed equation for the generalized phase describing the oscillator dynamics. The proposed method enables us to explore a broader class of rhythmic phenomena, in which the shape and frequency of the oscillation may vary largely because of the perturbations. We illustrate our method by analyzing the synchronization dynamics of limit cycle oscillators driven by strong periodic signals. It is shown that the proposed method accurately predicts the synchronization properties of the oscillators, while the conventional method does not.
  • The problem of stochastic advection of passive particles by circulating conserved flows on networks is formulated and investigated. The particles undergo transitions between the nodes with the transition rates determined by the flows passing through the links. Such stochastic advection processes lead to mixing of particles in the network and, in the final equilibrium state, concentration of particles in all nodes become equal. As we find, equilibration begins in the subset of nodes, representing flow hubs, and extends to the periphery nodes with weak flows. This behavior is related to the effect of localization of the eigenvectors of the advection matrix for considered networks. Applications of the results to problems involving spreading of infections or pollutants by traffic networks are discussed.
  • We formulate a theory for the collective phase description of oscillatory convection in Hele-Shaw cells. It enables us to describe the dynamics of the oscillatory convection by a single degree of freedom which we call the collective phase. The theory can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, stable time-periodic solutions to partial differential equations, representing the oscillatory convection. We derive the phase sensitivity function, which quantifies the phase response of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point, and analyze the phase synchronization between two weakly coupled Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection on the basis of the derived phase equations.
  • As proposed by Alan Turing in 1952 as a ubiquitous mechanism for nonequilibrium pattern formation, diffusional effects may destabilize uniform distributions of reacting chemical species and lead to both spatially and temporally heterogeneous patterns. While stationary Turing patterns are broadly known, the oscillatory instability, leading to traveling waves in continuous media and also called the wave bifurcation, is rare for chemical systems. Here, we extend the analysis by Turing to general networks and apply it to ecological metapopulations of biological species with dispersal connections between habitats. Remarkably, the oscillatory Turing instability does not lead to wave patterns in networks, but to spontaneous development of heterogeneous oscillations and possible extinction of some species, even though they are absent for isolated populations. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis reveals that this instability is more common in ecological metapopulations than in chemical reactions. Indeed, we find the instabilities for all possible food webs with three predator or prey species, under various assumptions about the mobility of individual species and nonlinear interactions between them. Therefore, we suggest that the oscillatory Turing instability is generic and must play a fundamental role in metapopulation dynamics, providing a common mechanism for dispersal-induced destabilization of ecosystems.
  • Sufficient conditions for the wave instability in general three-component reaction-diffusion systems are derived. These conditions are expressed in terms of the Jacobian matrix of the uniform steady state of the system, and enable us to determine whether the wave instability can be observed as the mobility of one of the species is gradually increased. It is found that the instability can also occur if one of the three species does not diffuse. Our results provide a useful criterion for searching wave instabilities in reaction-diffusion systems of various origins.
  • We develop a theory of collective phase description for globally coupled noisy excitable elements exhibiting macroscopic oscillations. Collective phase equations describing macroscopic rhythms of the system are derived from Langevin-type equations of globally coupled active rotators via a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation. The theory is an extension of the conventional phase reduction method for ordinary limit cycles to limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, such as the time-periodic solutions to nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations representing macroscopic rhythms. We demonstrate that the type of the collective phase sensitivity function near the onset of collective oscillations crucially depends on the type of the bifurcation, namely, it is type-I for the saddle-node bifurcation and type-II for the Hopf bifurcation.
  • We consider optimization of phase response curves for stochastic synchronization of non-interacting limit-cycle oscillators by common Poisson impulsive signals. The optimal functional shape for sufficiently weak signals is sinusoidal, but can differ for stronger signals. By solving the Euler-Lagrange equation associated with the minimization of the Lyapunov exponent characterizing synchronization efficiency, the optimal phase response curve is obtained. We show that the optimal shape mutates from a sinusoid to a sawtooth as the constraint on its squared amplitude is varied.
  • Nonlinear oscillators can mutually synchronize when they are driven by common external impulses. Two important scenarios are (i) synchronization resulting from phase locking of each oscillator to regular periodic impulses and (ii) noise-induced synchronization caused by Poisson random impulses, but their difference has not been fully quantified. Here we analyze a pair of uncoupled oscillators subject to common random impulses with gamma-distributed intervals, which can be smoothly interpolated between regular periodic and random Poisson impulses. Their dynamics are charac- terized by phase distributions, frequency detuning, Lyapunov exponents, and information-theoretic measures, which clearly reveal the differences between the two synchronization scenarios.
  • The phase description is a powerful tool for analyzing noisy limit cycle oscillators. The method, however, has found only limited applications so far, because the present theory is applicable only to the Gaussian noise while noise in the real world often has non-Gaussian statistics. Here, we provide the phase reduction for limit cycle oscillators subject to general, colored and non-Gaussian, noise including heavy-tailed noise. We derive quantifiers like mean frequency, diffusion constant, and the Lyapunov exponent to confirm consistency of the result. Applying our results, we additionally study a resonance between the phase and noise.
  • Phase synchronization between collective oscillations exhibited by two weakly interacting groups of non-identical phase oscillators with internal and external global sinusoidal coupling of the groups is analyzed theoretically. Coupled amplitude equations describing the collective oscillations of the oscillator groups are obtained by using the Ott-Antonsen ansatz, and then coupled phase equations for the collective oscillations are derived by phase reduction of the amplitude equations. The collective phase coupling function, which determines the dynamics of macroscopic phase differences between the groups, is calculated analytically. It is demonstrated that the groups can exhibit effective anti-phase collective synchronization even if the microscopic external coupling between individual oscillator pairs belonging to different groups is in-phase, and similarly effective in-phase collective synchronization in spite of microscopic anti-phase external coupling between the groups.
  • We theoretically investigate collective phase synchronization between interacting groups of globally coupled noisy identical phase oscillators exhibiting macroscopic rhythms. Using the phase reduction method, we derive coupled collective phase equations describing the macroscopic rhythms of the groups from microscopic Langevin phase equations of the individual oscillators via nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations. For sinusoidal microscopic coupling, we determine the type of the collective phase coupling function, i.e., whether the groups exhibit in-phase or anti-phase synchronization. We show that the macroscopic rhythms can exhibit effective anti-phase synchronization even if the microscopic phase coupling between the groups is in-phase, and vice versa. Moreover, near the onset of collective oscillations, we analytically obtain the collective phase coupling function using center-manifold and phase reductions of the nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations.
  • An effective white-noise Langevin equation is derived that describes long-time phase dynamics of a limit-cycle oscillator subjected to weak stationary colored noise. Effective drift and diffusion coefficients are given in terms of the phase sensitivity of the oscillator and the correlation function of the noise, and are explicitly calculated for oscillators with sinusoidal phase sensitivity functions driven by two typical colored Gaussian processes. The results are verified by numerical simulations using several types of stochastic or chaotic noise. The drift and diffusion coefficients of oscillators driven by chaotic noise exhibit anomalous dependence on the oscillator frequency, reflecting the peculiar power spectrum of the chaotic noise.
  • Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems provides a paradigm of nonequilibrium pattern formation; it has been extensively investigated for biological and chemical processes. Turing pattern formation should furthermore be possible in network-organized systems, such as cellular networks in morphogenesis and ecological metapopulations with dispersal connections between habitats, but investigations have so far been restricted to regular lattices and small networks. Here we report the first systematic investigation of Turing patterns in large random networks, which reveals their striking difference from the known classical behavior. In such networks, Turing instability leads to spontaneous differentiation of the network nodes into activator-rich and activator-low groups, but ordered periodic structures never develop. Only a subset of nodes having close degrees (numbers of links) undergoes differentiation, with its characteristic degree obeying a simple general law. Strong nonlinear restructuring process leads to multiple coexisting states and hysteresis effects. The final stationary patterns can be well understood in the framework of the mean-field approximation for network dynamics.