• Studies were made of the 1-70 keV persistent spectra of fifteen magnetars as a complete sample observed with Suzaku from 2006 to 2013. Combined with early NuSTAR observations of four hard X-ray emitters, nine objects showed a hard power-law emission dominating at $\gtrsim$10 keV with the 15--60 keV flux of $\sim$1-$11\times 10^{-11}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. The hard X-ray luminosity $L_{\rm h}$, relative to that of a soft-thermal surface radiation $L_{\rm s}$, tends to become higher toward younger and strongly magnetized objects. Updated from the previous study, their hardness ratio, defined as $\xi=L_{\rm h}/L_{\rm s}$, is correlated with the measured spin-down rate $\dot{P}$ as $\xi=0.62 \times (\dot{P}/10^{-11}\,{\rm s}\,{\rm s}^{-1})^{0.72}$, corresponding with positive and negative correlations of the dipole field strength $B_{\rm d}$ ($\xi \propto B_{\rm d}^{1.41}$) and the characteristic age $\tau_{\rm c}$ ($\xi \propto \tau_{\rm c}^{-0.68}$), respectively. Among our sample, five transients were observed during X-ray outbursts, and the results are compared with their long-term 1-10 keV flux decays monitored with Swift/XRT and RXTE/PCA. Fading curves of three bright outbursts are approximated by an empirical formula used in the seismology, showing a $\sim$10-40 d plateau phase. Transients show the maximum luminosities of $L_{\rm s}$$\sim$$10^{35}$ erg s$^{-1}$, which is comparable to those of the persistently bright ones, and fade back to $\lesssim$$10^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Spectral properties are discussed in a framework of the magnetar hypothesis.
  • Improvements of in-orbit calibration of GSO scintillators in the Hard X-ray Detector on board Suzaku are reported. To resolve an apparent change of the energy scale of GSO which appeared across the launch for unknown reasons, consistent and thorough re-analyses of both pre-launch and in-orbit data have been performed. With laboratory experiments using spare hardware, the pulse height offset, corresponding to zero energy input, was found to change by ~0.5 of the full analog voltage scale, depending on the power supply. Furthermore, by carefully calculating all the light outputs of secondaries from activation lines used in the in-orbit gain determination, their energy deposits in GSO were found to be effectively lower, by several percent, than their nominal energies. Taking both these effects into account, the in-orbit data agrees with the on-ground measurements within ~5%, without employing the artificial correction introduced in the previous work (Kokubun et al. 2007). With this knowledge, we updated the data processing, the response, and the auxiliary files of GSO, and reproduced the HXD-PIN and HXD-GSO spectra of the Crab Nebula over 12-300 keV by a broken powerlaw with a break energy of ~110 keV.