• We discuss the progress in integration of nanodiamonds with photonic devices for quantum optics applications. Experimental results in GaP, SiO2 and SiC-nanodiamond platforms show that various regimes of light and matter interaction can be achieved by engineering color center systems through hybrid approaches. We present our recent results on the growth of color center-rich nanodiamond on prefabricated 3C-SiC microdisk resonators. These hybrid devices achieve up to five-fold enhancement of diamond color center light emission and can be employed for integrated quantum photonics.
  • We report the formation of perfectly aligned, high-density, shallow nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers on the ($111$) surface of a diamond. The study involved step-flow growth with a high flux of nitrogen during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, which resulted in the formation of a highly concentrated (>$10^{19}$ cm$^{-3}$) nitrogen layer approximately $10$ nm away from the substrate surface. Photon counts obtained from the NV centers indicated the presence of $6.1$x$10^{15}$-$3.1$x$10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$ NV centers, which suggested the formation of an ensemble of NV centers. The optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectrum confirmed perfect alignment (more than $99$ %) for all the samples fabricated by step-flow growth via CVD. Perfectly aligned shallow ensemble NV centers indicated a high Rabi contrast of approximately $30$ % which is comparable to the values reported for a single NV center. Nanoscale NMR demonstrated surface-sensitive nuclear spin detection and provided a confirmation of the NV centers depth. Single NV center approximation indicated that the depth of the NV centers was approximately $9$-$10.7$ nm from the surface with error of less than $\pm$$0.8$ nm. Thus, a route for material control of shallow NV centers has been developed by step-flow growth using a CVD system. Our finding pioneers on the atomic level control of NV center alignment for large area quantum magnetometry.
  • We demonstrate a new approach for engineering group IV semiconductor-based quantum photonic structures containing negatively charged silicon-vacancy (SiV$^-$) color centers in diamond as quantum emitters. Hybrid SiC/diamond structures are realized by combining the growth of nanoand micro-diamonds on silicon carbide (3C or 4H polytype) substrates, with the subsequent use of these diamond crystals as a hard mask for pattern transfer. SiV$^-$ color centers are incorporated in diamond during its synthesis from molecular diamond seeds (diamondoids), with no need for ionimplantation or annealing. We show that the same growth technique can be used to grow a diamond layer controllably doped with SiV$^-$ on top of a high purity bulk diamond, in which we subsequently fabricate nanopillar arrays containing high quality SiV$^-$ centers. Scanning confocal photoluminescence measurements reveal optically active SiV$^-$ lines both at room temperature and low temperature (5 K) from all fabricated structures, and, in particular, very narrow linewidths and small inhomogeneous broadening of SiV$^-$ lines from all-diamond nano-pillar arrays, which is a critical requirement for quantum computation. At low temperatures (5 K) we observe in these structures the signature typical of SiV$^-$ centers in bulk diamond, consistent with a double lambda. These results indicate that high quality color centers can be incorporated into nanophotonic structures synthetically with properties equivalent to those in bulk diamond, thereby opening opportunities for applications in classical and quantum information processing.