• The search for Majorana bound state (MBS) has recently emerged as one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics, fueled by the prospect of using its non-Abelian statistics for robust quantum computation. A highly sought-after platform for MBS is two-dimensional topological superconductors, where MBS is predicted to exist as a zero-energy mode in the core of a vortex. A clear observation of MBS, however, is often hindered by the presence of additional low-lying bound states inside the vortex core. By using scanning tunneling microscope on the newly discovered superconducting Dirac surface state of iron-based superconductor FeTe1-xSex (x = 0.45, superconducting transition temperature Tc = 14.5 K), we clearly observe a sharp and non-split zero-bias peak inside a vortex core. Systematic studies of its evolution under different magnetic fields, temperatures, and tunneling barriers strongly suggest that this is the case of tunneling to a nearly pure MBS, separated from non-topological bound states which is moved away from the zero energy due to the high ratio between the superconducting gap and the Fermi energy in this material. This observation offers a new, robust platform for realizing and manipulating MBSs at a relatively high temperature.
  • The growth, atomic structure, and electronic property of trilayer graphene (TLG) on Ru(0001) were studied by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combined with tight-binding approximation (TBA) calculations. TLG on Ru(0001) shows a flat surface with a hexagonal lattice due to the screening effect of the bottom two layers and the AB-stacking in the top two layers. The coexistence of AA- and AB-stacking in the bottom two layers leads to three different stacking orders of TLG, namely, ABA-, ABC-, and ABB-stacking. STS measurements combined with TBA calculations reveal that the density of states of TLG with ABC- and ABB-stacking is characterized by one and two sharp peaks near to the Fermi level, respectively, in contrast to the V-shaped feature of TLG with ABA-stacking. Our work demonstrates that TLG on Ru(0001) might be an ideal platform for exploring stacking-dependent electronic properties of graphene.
  • A methodology of atomically resolved Land\'{e} g factor mapping of a single molecule is reported. Mn(II)-phthalocyanine (MnPc) molecules on Au(111) surface can be dehydrogenated via atomic manipulation with manifestation of tailored extended Kondo effect, which can allow atomically resolved imaging of the Land\'{e} g factor inside a molecule for the first time. By employing dehydrogenated MnPc molecules with removal of six H atoms (-6H-MnPc) as an example, Land\'{e} g factor of atomic constituents of the molecule can be obtained, therefore offering a unique g factor mapping of single molecule. Our results open up a new avenue to access local spin texture of a single molecule.
  • We studied the mechanism of half-metallicity (HM) formation in transition metal doped (TM) conjugated carbon based structures by first-principles electronic structure simulations. It is found that the HM is a rather complex phenomenon, determined by the ligand field splitting of d-orbitals of the transition metal (TM) atoms, the exchange splitting and the number of valence electrons. Since most of the conjugated carbon based structures possess ligands with intermediate strength, the ordering of the d-orbital splitting is similar in all structures, and the HM properties evolve according to the number of valence electrons. Based on this insight we predict that Cr-, Fe-, Co-doped graphyne will show HM, while Mn- and Ni-doped graphyne will not. By tuning the number of valence electron, we are thus able to control the emergence of HM and control the energy gaps evolving in majority or minority spin channels.
  • We report electrical conductance and thermopower measurements on InAs nanowires synthesized by chemical vapor deposition. Gate modulation of the thermopower of individual InAs nanowires with diameter around 20nm is obtained over T=40 to 300K. At low temperatures (T< ~100K), oscillations in the thermopower and power factor concomitant with the stepwise conductance increases are observed as the gate voltage shifts the chemical potential of electrons in InAs nanowire through quasi-one-dimensional (1D) sub-bands. This work experimentally shows the possibility to modulate semiconductor nanowire's thermoelectric properties through the peaked 1D electronic density of states in the diffusive transport regime, a long-sought goal in nanostructured thermoelectrics research. Moreover, we point out the importance of scattering (or disorder) induced energy level broadening in smearing out the 1D confinement enhanced thermoelectric power factor at practical temperatures (e.g. 300K).
  • The adsorption of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA) on the Au(111) surface and azobenzene on the Ag(111) surface is investigated using density functional theory (DFT) with a non-local density functional (vdW-DF) and a semi-local Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) functional. For BDA on Au(111), the inclusion of London dispersion interactions not only dramatically enhances the molecule-substrate binding, resulting in adsorption energies consistent with experimental results, but also significantly alters the BDA binding geometry. For azobenzene on Ag(111), the vdW-DF produces superior adsorption energies compared to those obtained with other dispersion corrected DFT approaches. These results provide evidence for the applicability of the vdW-DF method and serves as a practical benchmark for the investigation of molecules adsorbed on noble metal surfaces.
  • We develop a strategy for graphene growth on Ru(0001) followed by silicon-layer intercalation that not only weakens the interaction of graphene with the metal substrate but also retains its superlative properties. This G/Si/Ru architecture, produced by silicon-layer intercalation approach (SIA), was characterized by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved electron photoemission spectroscopy. These experiments show high structural and electronic qualities of this new composite. The SIA allows for an atomic control of the distance between the graphene and the metal substrate that can be used as a top gate. Our results show potential for the next generation of graphene-based materials with tailored properties.