• The relation between magnetic and velocity fields in the solar atmosphere is a topic that can now be addressed quantitatively at the statistical level. Here we analyze kinetic energy and cross helicity spectra along with magnetic energy and helicity spectra in two solar active regions using vector magnetograms and Dopplergrams of NOAA~11158 and 12266. Within these active regions, we find similar slopes for kinetic and magnetic energy spectra at intermediate wavenumbers, where the contribution from the granulation velocity has been removed. At wavenumbers around $0.3\Mm^{-1}$, the magnetic helicity is found to be close to its maximal value. The cross helicity spectra are found to be within about 10\% of the maximum possible value. We also develop a two-scale method for cross helicity spectra, which allows us to take the cancellation from the bipolarity of active regions into account. In the quiet Sun, by comparison, the cross helicity spectrum is found to be small.
  • We intend to analyse the intermittency spectra of current helicity in solar active regions. We made a pixel-by-pixel comparison of current helicity maps derived from three different instruments, namely by Helioseismic and Magnetc Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/HMI), Spectro-Polarimeter on board the Hinode, and Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station, China (HSOS/SMFT). The comparison showed an excellent correlation between the maps derived from the spaceborne instruments and moderate correlation between the maps derived from SDO/HMI and HSOS/SMFT vector magnetograms. The results suggest that the obtained maps characterize real spatial distribution of current helicity over an active region. To analyse the multifractality and intermittency of current helicity, we traditionally use the high-order structure function and flatness function approach. The slope of a flatness function within some range of scales - the flatness exponent - is a measure of the degree of intermittency. We used SDO/HMI vector magnetograms to calculate the flatness exponent variations of current helicity of three active regions: NOAA 11158, 12494, and 12673. The flatness exponents were determined within the scale range of 2-10 Mm. All three regions exhibited emergence of a new magnetic flux during the observational interval. Interestingly, the flatness exponent increased rapidly 12-20 hours before the emergence of a new flux and restored its previous value by the beginning of the emergence. We suppose that this behaviour can be explained by subphotospheric fragmentation or distortion of the existed current system by emerging magnetic flux. During the imperturbable development of active region, the flatness exponent of current helicity remains relatively low and the intermittency range shifts toward higher values up to 20-40 Mm.
  • We recently proposed a method to calculate the relative magnetic helicity in a finite volume for a given magnetic field which however required the flux to be balanced separately on all the sides of the considered volume. In order to allow finite magnetic fluxes through the boundaries, a Coulomb gauge is constructed that allows for global magnetic flux balance. We tested and verified our method in a theoretical fore-free magnetic field model. We apply the new method to the former calculation data and found a difference of less than 1.2\%. We also applied our method to the magnetic field above active region NOAA 11429 obtained by a new photospheric-data-driven MHD model code GOEMHD3. We analyzed the magnetic helicity evolution in the solar corona using our new method. It was found that the normalized magnetic helicityis equal to -0.038 when fast magnetic reconnection is triggered. This value is comparable to the previous value (-0.029) in the MHD simulations when magnetic reconnection happened and the observed normalized magnetic helicity (-0.036) from the eruption of newly emerging active regions. We found that only 8\% of the accumulated magnetic helicity is dissipated after it is injected through the bottom boundary. This is in accordance with the Woltjer conjecture. Only 2\% of magnetic helicity injected from the bottom boundary escapes through the corona. This is consistent with the observation of magnetic clouds, which could take away magnetic helicity into the interplanetary space, in the case considered here, several halo CMEs and two X-class solar flares origin from this active region.
  • We present the photospheric energy density of magnetic fields in two solar active regions inferred from observational vector magnetograms, and compare it with the possible different defined energy parameters of magnetic fields in the photosphere. We analyze the magnetic fields in active region NOAA 6580-6619-6659 and 11158. It is noticed that the quantity 1/4pi Bn.Bp is an important energy parameter that reflects the contribution of magnetic shear on the difference between the potential magnetic field (Bp) and non-potential one (Bn), and also the contribution to the free magnetic energy near the magnetic neutral lines in the active regions. It is found that the photospheric mean magnetic energy density changes obviously before the powerful solar flares in the active region NOAA 11158, it is consistent with the change of magnetic fields in the lower atmosphere with flares.
  • We adopt an isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field to estimate the magnetic energy and helicity spectra as well as current helicity spectra of two individual active regions (NOAA 11158 and NOAA 11515) and the change of the spectral indices during their development as well as during the solar cycle. The departure of the spectral indices of magnetic energy and current helicity from 5/3 are analyzed, and it is found that it is lower than the spectral index of the magnetic energy spectrum. Furthermore, the fractional magnetic helicity tends to increase when the scale of the energy-carrying magnetic structures increases. The magnetic helicity of NOAA 11515 violates the expected hemispheric sign rule, which is interpreted as an effect of enhanced field strengths at scales larger than 30-60Mm with opposite signs of helicity. This is consistent with the general cycle dependence, which shows that around the solar maximum the magnetic energy and helicity spectra are steeper, emphasizing the large-scale field.
  • We present the observation of a major solar eruption that is associated with fast sunspot rotation. The event includes a sigmoidal filament eruption, a coronal mass ejection, and a GOES X2.1 flare from NOAA active region 11283. The filament and some overlying arcades were partially rooted in a sunspot. The sunspot rotated at $\sim$10$^\circ$ per hour rate during a period of 6 hours prior to the eruption. In this period, the filament was found to rise gradually along with the sunspot rotation. Based on the HMI observation, for an area along the polarity inversion line underneath the filament, we found gradual pre-eruption decreases of both the mean strength of the photospheric horizontal field ($B_h$) and the mean inclination angle between the vector magnetic field and the local radial (or vertical) direction. These observations are consistent with the pre-eruption gradual rising of the filament-associated magnetic structure. In addition, according to the Non-Linear Force-Free-Field reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field, a pre-eruption magnetic flux rope structure is found to be in alignment with the filament, and a considerable amount of magnetic energy was transported to the corona during the period of sunspot rotation. Our study provides evidences that in this event sunspot rotation plays an important role in twisting, energizing, and destabilizing the coronal filament-flux rope system, and led to the eruption. We also propose that the pre-event evolution of $B_h$ may be used to discern the driving mechanism of eruptions.
  • Based on several magnetic nonpotentiality parameters obtained from the vector photospheric active region magnetograms obtained with the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at the Huairou Solar Observing Station over two solar cycles, a machine learning model has been constructed to predict the occurrence of flares in the corresponding active region within a certain time window. The Support Vector Classifier, a widely used general classifier, is applied to build and test the prediction models. Several classical verification measures are adopted to assess the quality of the predictions. We investigate different flare levels within various time windows, and thus it is possible to estimate the rough classes and erupting times of flares for particular active regions. Several combinations of predictors have been tested in the experiments. The True Skill Statistics are higher than 0.36 in 97% of cases and the Heidke Skill Scores range from 0.23 to 0.48. The predictors derived from longitudinal magnetic fields do perform well, however they are less sensitive in predicting large flares. Employing the nonpotentiality predictors from vector fields improves the performance of predicting large flares of magnitude $\geq$M5.0 and $\geq$X1.0.
  • We have proposed a method to calculate the relative magnetic helicity in a finite volume as given the magnetic field in the former paper (Yang et al. {\it Solar Physics}, {\bf 283}, 369, 2013). This method requires that the magnetic flux to be balanced on all the side boundaries of the considered volume. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain the vector potentials at the boundaries to remove the above restriction. We also used a theoretical model (Low and Lou, {\it Astrophys. J.} {\bf 352}, 343, 1990) to test our scheme.
  • An investigation on correlations between photospheric current helicity and subsur- face kinetic helicity is carried out by analyzing vector magnetograms and subsurface velocities for two rapidly developing active regions. The vector magnetograms are from the SDO/HMI (Solar Dynamics Observatory / Helioseismic and Magnetic Im- ager) observed Stokes parameters, and the subsurface velocity is from time-distance data-analysis pipeline using HMI Dopplergrams. Over a span of several days, the evo- lution of the weighted current helicity shows a tendency similar to that of the weighted subsurface kinetic helicity, attaining a correlation coefficient above 0.60 for both ac- tive regions. Additionally, there seems to be a phase lag between the evolutions of the unweighted current and subsurface kinetic helicities for one of the active regions. The good correlation between these two helicities indicate that there is some intrinsic con- nection between the interior dynamics and photospheric magnetic twistedness inside active regions, which may help to interpret the well-known hemispheric preponder- ance of current-helicity distribution.
  • A statistical study is carried out on the photospheric magnetic nonpotentiality in solar active regions and its relationship with associated flares. We select 2173 photospheric vector magnetograms from 1106 active regions observed by the Solar Magnetic Field Telescope at Huairou Solar Observing Station, National Astronomical Observatories of China, in the period of 1988-2008, which covers most of the 22nd and 23rd solar cycles. We have computed the mean planar magnetic shear angle (\bar{\Delta\phi}), mean shear angle of the vector magnetic field (\bar{\Delta\psi}), mean absolute vertical current density (\bar{|J_{z}|}), mean absolute current helicity density (\bar{|h_{c}|}), absolute twist parameter (|\alpha_{av}|), mean free magnetic energy density (\bar{\rho_{free}}), effective distance of the longitudinal magnetic field (d_{E}), and modified effective distance (d_{Em}) of each photospheric vector magnetogram. Parameters \bar{|h_{c}|}, \bar{\rho_{free}}, and d_{Em} show higher correlation with the evolution of the solar cycle. The Pearson linear correlation coefficients between these three parameters and the yearly mean sunspot number are all larger than 0.59. Parameters \bar{\Delta\phi}, \bar{\Delta\psi}, \bar{|J_{z}|}, |\alpha_{av}|, and d_{E} show only weak correlations with the solar cycle, though the nonpotentiality and the complexity of active regions are greater in the activity maximum periods than in the minimum periods. All of the eight parameters show positive correlations with the flare productivity of active regions, and the combination of different nonpotentiality parameters may be effective in predicting the flaring probability of active regions.
  • The magnetic chirality in solar atmosphere has been studied based on the soft X-ray and magnetic field observations. It is found that some of large-scale twisted soft X-ray loop systems occur for several months in the solar atmosphere, before the disappearance of the corresponding background large-scale magnetic field. It provides the observational evidence of the helicity of the large-scale magnetic field in the solar atmosphere and the reverse one relative to the helicity rule in both hemispheres with solar cycles. The transfer of the magnetic helicity from the subatmosphere is consistent with the formation of large-scale twisted soft X-ray loops in the both solar hemispheres.
  • Previously unobservable mirror asymmetry of the solar magnetic field -- a key ingredient of the dynamo mechanism which is believed to drive the 11-year activity cycle -- has now been measured. This was achieved through systematic monitoring of solar active regions carried out for more than 20 years at observatories in Mees, Huairou, and Mitaka. In this paper we report on detailed analysis of vector magnetic field data, obtained at Huairou Solar Observing Station in China. Electric current helicity (the product of current and magnetic field component in the same direction) was estimated from the data and a latitude-time plot of solar helicity during the last two solar cycles has been produced. We find that like sunspots helicity patterns propagate equatorwards but unlike sunspot polarity helicity in each solar hemisphere does not change sign from cycle to cycle - confirming the theory. There are, however, two significant time-latitudinal domains in each cycle when the sign does briefly invert. Our findings shed new light on stellar and planetary dynamos and has yet to be included in the theory.