• This paper studies the need for individualizing vehicular communications in order to improve collision warning systems for an N-lane highway scenario. By relating the traffic-based and communications studies, we aim at reducing highway traffic accidents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper that shows how to customize vehicular communications to driver's characteristics and traffic information. We propose to develop VANET protocols that selectively identify crash relevant information and customize the communications of that information based on each driver's assigned safety score. In this paper, first, we derive the packet success probability by accounting for multi-user interference, path loss, and fading. Then, by Monte carlo simulations, we demonstrate how appropriate channel access probabilities that satisfy the delay requirements of the safety application result in noticeable performance enhancement.
  • Every year, many people are killed and injured in highway traffic accidents. In order to reduce such casualties, collisions warning systems has been studied extensively. These systems are built by taking the driver reaction times into account. However, most of the existing literature focuses on characterizing how driver reaction times vary across an entire population. Therefore, many of the warnings that are given turn out to be false alarms. A false alarm occurs whenever a warning is sent, but it is not needed. This would nagate any safety benefit of the system, and could even reduce the overall safety if warnings become a distraction. In this paper, we propose our solution to address the described problem; First, we briefly describe our method for estimating the distribution of brake response times for a particular driver using data from a Vehicular Ad-Hoc Network (VANET) system. Then, we investigate how brake response times of individual drivers can be used in collision warning algorithms to reduce false alarm rates while still maintaining a high level of safety. This will yield a system that is overall more reliable and trustworthy for drivers, which could lead to wider adoption and applicability for V2V/V2I communication systems. Moreover, we show how false alarm rate varies with respect to probability of accident. Our simulation results show that by individualizing collision warnings the number of false alarms can be reduced more than $50\%$. Then, we conclude safety applications could potentially take full advantage of being customized to an individual's characteristics.
  • Many popular applications use traces of user data to offer various services to their users. However, even if user data is anonymized and obfuscated, a user's privacy can be compromised through the use of statistical matching techniques that match a user trace to prior user behavior. In this work, we derive the theoretical bounds on the privacy of users in such a scenario. We build on our recent study in the area of location privacy, in which we introduced formal notions of location privacy for anonymization-based location privacy-protection mechanisms. Here we derive the fundamental limits of user privacy when both anonymization and obfuscation-based protection mechanisms are applied to users' time series of data. We investigate the impact of such mechanisms on the trade-off between privacy protection and user utility. We first study achievability results for the case where the time-series of users are governed by an i.i.d. process. The converse results are proved both for the i.i.d. case as well as the more general Markov chain model. We demonstrate that as the number of users in the network grows, the obfuscation-anonymization plane can be divided into two regions: in the first region, all users have perfect privacy; and, in the second region, no user has privacy.
  • Modern applications significantly enhance user experience by adapting to each user's individual condition and/or preferences. While this adaptation can greatly improve utility or be essential for the application to work (e.g., for ride-sharing applications), the exposure of user data to the application presents a significant privacy threat to the users, even when the traces are anonymized, since the statistical matching of an anonymized trace to prior user behavior can identify a user and their habits. Because of the current and growing algorithmic and computational capabilities of adversaries, provable privacy guarantees as a function of the degree of anonymization and obfuscation of the traces are necessary. Our previous work has established the requirements on anonymization and obfuscation in the case that data traces are independent between users. However, the data traces of different users will be dependent in many applications, and an adversary can potentially exploit such. In this paper, we consider the impact of correlation between user traces on their privacy. First, we demonstrate that the adversary can readily identify the association graph, revealing which user data traces are correlated. Next, we demonstrate that the adversary can use this association graph to break user privacy with significantly shorter traces than in the case when traces are independent between users, and that independent obfuscation of the data traces is often insufficient to remedy such. Finally, we discuss how the users can employ dependency in their obfuscation to improve their privacy.
  • In this paper, a new approach for multiple access (MA) in fifth generation (5G) of cellular networks called power domain sparse code multiple access (PSMA) is proposed. In PSMA, we adopt both the power domain and the code domain to transmit multiple users' signals over a subcarrier simultaneously. In such a model, the same SCMA codebook can be used by multiple users where, for these users, power domain non-orthogonal multiple access (PD-NOMA) technique is used to send signals non-orthogonally. Although different SCMA codebooks are orthogonal and produce no interference over each other, the same codebook used by multiple users produces interference over these users. We investigate the signal model as well as the receiver and transmitter of the PSMA method. To evaluate the performance of PSMA, we consider a heterogeneous cellular network (HetNet). In this case our design objective is to maximize the system sum rate of the network subject to some system level and QoS constraints such as transmit power constraints. We formulate the proposed resource allocation problem as an optimization problem and solve it by successive convex approximation (SCA) techniques. Moreover, we compare PSMA with sparse code multiple access (SCMA) and PD-NOMA from the performance and computational complexity perspective. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed approach is investigated using numerical results. We show that by a reasonable increase in complexity, PSMA can improve the spectral efficiency about 50\% compared to SCMA and PD-NOMA.
  • This paper considers secure energy-efficient routing in the presence of multiple passive eavesdroppers. Previous work in this area has considered secure routing assuming probabilistic or exact knowledge of the location and channel-state-information (CSI) of each eavesdropper. In wireless networks, however, the locations and CSIs of passive eavesdroppers are not known, making it challenging to guarantee secrecy for any routing algorithm. We develop an efficient (in terms of energy consumption and computational complexity) routing algorithm that does not rely on any information about the locations and CSIs of the eavesdroppers. Our algorithm guarantees secrecy even in disadvantaged wireless environments, where multiple eavesdroppers try to eavesdrop each message, are equipped with directional antennas, or can get arbitrarily close to the transmitter. The key is to employ additive random jamming to exploit inherent non-idealities of the eavesdropper's receiver, which makes the eavesdroppers incapable of recording the messages. We have simulated our proposed algorithm and compared it with existing secrecy routing algorithms in both single-hop and multi-hop networks. Our results indicate that when the uncertainty in the locations of eavesdroppers is high and/or in disadvantaged wireless environments, our algorithm outperforms existing algorithms in terms of energy consumption and secrecy.
  • The popularity of mobile devices and location-based services (LBS) has created great concern regarding the location privacy of their users. Anonymization is a common technique that is often used to protect the location privacy of LBS users. Here, we present an information-theoretic approach to define the notion of perfect location privacy. We show how LBS's should use the anonymization method to ensure that their users can achieve perfect location privacy. First, we assume that a user's current location is independent from her past locations. Using this i.i.d model, we show that if the pseudonym of the user is changed before $O(n^{\frac{2}{r-1}})$ observations are made by the adversary for that user, then the user has perfect location privacy. Here, n is the number of the users in the network and r is the number of all possible locations that users can go to. Next, we model users' movements using Markov chains to better model real-world movement patterns. We show that perfect location privacy is achievable for a user if the user's pseudonym is changed before $O(n^{\frac{2}{|E|-r}})$ observations are collected by the adversary for the user, where |E| is the number of edges in the user's Markov chain model.
  • The effectiveness and simple implementation of physical layer jammers make them an essential threat for wireless networks. In a multihop wireless network, where jammers can interfere with the transmission of user messages at intermediate nodes along the path, one can employ jamming oblivious routing and then employ physical-layer techniques (e.g. spread spectrum) to suppress jamming. However, whereas these approaches can provide significant gains, the residual jamming can still severely limit system performance. This motivates the consideration of routing approaches that account for the differences in the jamming environment between different paths. First, we take a straightforward approach where an equal outage probability is allocated to each link along a path and develop a minimum energy routing solution. Next, we demonstrate the shortcomings of this approach and then consider the joint problem of outage allocation and routing by employing an approximation to the link outage probability. This yields an efficient and effective routing algorithm that only requires knowledge of the measured jamming at each node. Numerical results demonstrate that the amount of energy saved by the proposed methods with respect to a standard minimum energy routing algorithm, especially for parameters appropriate for terrestrial wireless networks, is substantial.
  • This paper discusses the need for individualizing safety systems and proposes an approach including the Real-Time estimation of the distribution of brake response times for an individual driver. While maintaining high level of safety, the collision warning system should send "tailored" responses to the driver. This method could be the first step to show that safety applications would potentially benefit from customizing to individual drivers' characteristics using VANET. Our simulation results show that, as one of the imminent and preliminary outcomes of the new improved system, the number of false alarms will be reduced by more than 40%. We think this tactic can reach to even beyond the safety applications for designing the future innovative systems.
  • Secure communication over a wiretap channel is considered in the disadvantaged wireless environment, where the eavesdropper channel is (possibly much) better than the main channel. We present a method to exploit inherent vulnerabilities of the eavesdropper's receiver to obtain everlasting secrecy. Based on an ephemeral cryptographic key pre-shared between the transmitter Alice and the intended recipient Bob, a random jamming signal is added to each symbol. Bob can subtract the jamming signal before recording the signal, while the eavesdropper Eve is forced to perform these non-commutative operations in the opposite order. Thus, information-theoretic secrecy can be obtained, hence achieving the goal of converting the vulnerable "cheap" cryptographic secret key bits into "valuable" information-theoretic (i.e. everlasting) secure bits. We evaluate the achievable secrecy rates for different settings, and show that, even when the eavesdropper has perfect access to the output of the transmitter (albeit through an imperfect analog-to-digital converter), the method can still achieve a positive secrecy rate. Next we consider a wideband system, where Alice and Bob perform frequency hopping in addition to adding the random jamming to the signal, and we show the utility of such an approach even in the face of substantial eavesdropper hardware capabilities.
  • Adapting the functioning of the collision warning systems to the specific drivers' characteristics is of great benefit to drivers. For example, by customizing collision warning algorithms we can minimize false alarms, thereby reducing injuries and deaths in highway traffic accidents. In order to take the behaviors of individual drivers into account, the system needs to have a Real-Time estimation of the distribution of brake response times for an individual driver. In this paper, we propose a method for doing this estimation which is not computationally intensive and can take advantage of the information contained in all data points.
  • Secure communication over a memoryless wiretap channel in the presence of a passive eavesdropper is considered. Traditional information-theoretic security methods require an advantage for the main channel over the eavesdropper channel to achieve a positive secrecy rate, which in general cannot be guaranteed in wireless systems. Here, we exploit the non-linear conversion operation in the eavesdropper's receiver to obtain the desired advantage - even when the eavesdropper has perfect access to the transmitted signal at the input to their receiver. The basic idea is to employ an ephemeral cryptographic key to force the eavesdropper to conduct two operations, at least one of which is non-linear, in a different order than the desired recipient. Since non-linear operations are not necessarily commutative, the desired advantage can be obtained and information-theoretic secrecy achieved even if the eavesdropper is given the cryptographic key immediately upon transmission completion. In essence, the lack of knowledge of the key during the short transmission time inhibits the recording of the signal in such a way that the secret information can never be extracted from it. The achievable secrecy rates for different countermeasures that the eavesdropper might employ are evaluated. It is shown that even in the case of an eavesdropper with uniformly better conditions (channel and receiver quality) than the intended recipient, a positive secure rate can be achieved.
  • Many analytic results for the connectivity, coverage, and capacity of wireless networks have been reported for the case where the number of nodes, $n$, tends to infinity (large-scale networks). The majority of these results have not been extended for small or moderate values of $n$; whereas in many practical networks, $n$ is not very large. In this paper, we consider finite (small-scale) wireless sensor networks. We first show that previous asymptotic results provide poor approximations for such networks. We provide a set of differences between small-scale and large-scale analysis and propose a methodology for analysis of finite sensor networks. Furthermore, we consider two models for such networks: unreliable sensor grids, and sensor networks with random node deployment. We provide easily computable expressions for bounds on the coverage and connectivity of these networks. With validation from simulations, we show that the derived analytic expressions give very good estimates of such quantities for finite sensor networks. Our investigation confirms the fact that small-scale networks possesses unique characteristics different from the large-scale counterparts, necessitating the development of a new framework for their analysis and design.
  • In this paper, we study polar codes from a practical point of view. In particular, we study concatenated polar codes and rate-compatible polar codes. First, we propose a concatenation scheme including polar codes and Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. We will show that our proposed scheme outperforms conventional concatenation schemes formed by LDPC and Reed-Solomon (RS) codes. We then study two rate-compatible coding schemes using polar codes. We will see that polar codes can be designed as universally capacity achieving rate-compatible codes over a set of physically degraded channels. We also study the effect of puncturing on polar codes to design rate-compatible codes.