• We investigate the quenching properties of central and satellite galaxies, utilizing the halo masses and central-satellite identifications from the SDSS galaxy group catalog of Yang et al. We find that the quenched fractions of centrals and satellites of similar stellar masses have similar dependence on host halo mass. The similarity of the two populations is also found in terms of specific star formation rate and 4000 \AA\ break. The quenched fractions of centrals and satellites of similar masses show similar dependencies on bulge-to-total light ratio, central velocity dispersion and halo-centric distance in halos of given halo masses. The prevalence of optical/radio-loud AGNs is found to be similar for centrals and satellites at given stellar masses. All these findings strongly suggest that centrals and satellites of similar masses experience similar quenching processes in their host halos. We discuss implications of our results for the understanding of galaxy quenching.
  • In a recent study, using the distribution of galaxies in the north galactic pole of SDSS DR7 region enclosed in a 500$\mpch$ box, we carried out our ELUCID simulation (Wang et al. 2016, ELUCID III). Here we {\it light} the dark matter halos and subhalos in the reconstructed region in the simulation with galaxies in the SDSS observations using a novel {\it neighborhood} abundance matching method. Before we make use of thus established galaxy-subhalo connections in the ELUCID simulation to evaluate galaxy formation models, we set out to explore the reliability of such a link. For this purpose, we focus on the following a few aspects of galaxies: (1) the central-subhalo luminosity and mass relations; (2) the satellite fraction of galaxies; (3) the conditional luminosity function (CLF) and conditional stellar mass function (CSMF) of galaxies; and (4) the cross correlation functions between galaxies and the dark matter particles, most of which are measured separately for all, red and blue galaxy populations. We find that our neighborhood abundance matching method accurately reproduces the central-subhalo relations, satellite fraction, the CLFs and CSMFs and the biases of galaxies. These features ensure that thus established galaxy-subhalo connections will be very useful in constraining galaxy formation processes. And we provide some suggestions on the three levels of using the galaxy-subhalo pairs for galaxy formation constraints. The galaxy-subhalo links and the subhalo merger trees in the SDSS DR7 region extracted from our ELUCID simulation are available upon request.
  • We examine the thermal energy contents of the intergalactic medium (IGM) over three orders of magnitude in both mass density and gas temperature using thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (tSZE). The analysis is based on {\it Planck} tSZE map and the cosmic density field, reconstructed for the SDSS DR7 volume and sampled on a grid of cubic cells of $(1h^{-1}{\rm Mpc})^3$, together with a matched filter technique employed to maximize the signal-to-noise. Our results show that the pressure - density relation of the IGM is roughly a power law given by an adiabatic equation of state, with an indication of steepening at densities higher than about $10$ times the mean density of the universe. The implied average gas temperature is $\sim 10^4\,{\rm K}$ in regions of mean density, $\rho_{\rm m} \sim {\overline\rho}_{\rm m}$, increasing to about $10^5\,{\rm K}$ for $\rho_{\rm m} \sim 10\,{\overline\rho}_{\rm m}$, and to $>10^{6}\,{\rm K}$ for $\rho_{\rm m} \sim 100\,{\overline\rho}_{\rm m}$. At a given density, the thermal energy content of the IGM is also found to be higher in regions of stronger tidal fields, likely due to shock heating by the formation of large scale structure and/or feedback from galaxies and AGNs. A comparison of the results with hydrodynamic simulations suggests that the current data can already provide interesting constraints on galaxy formation.
  • We present the detection of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (kSZE) signals from groups of galaxies as a function of halo mass down to $\log (M_{500}/{\rm M_\odot}) \sim 12.3$, using the {\it Planck} CMB maps and stacking about $40,000$ galaxy systems with known positions, halo masses, and peculiar velocities. A multi-frequency matched filter technique is employed to maximize the signal-to-noise, and the filter matching is done simultaneously for different groups to take care of projection effects of nearby halos. The total kSZE flux within halos estimated from the amplitudes of the matched filters implies that the gas fraction in halos is about the universal baryon fraction, even in low-mass halos, indicating that the `missing baryons' are found. Various tests performed show that our results are robust against systematic effects, such as contamination by infrared/radio sources and background variations. Combined with the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, our results indicate that the `missing baryons' associated with galaxy groups are contained in warm-hot media with temperatures between $10^5$ and $10^6\,{\rm K}$.
  • We use a 200 $h^{-1}Mpc$ a side N-body simulation to study the mass accretion history (MAH) of dark matter halos to be accreted by larger halos, which we call infall halos. We define a quantity $a_{\rm nf}\equiv (1+z_{\rm f})/(1+z_{\rm peak})$ to characterize the MAH of infall halos, where $z_{\rm peak}$ and $z_{\rm f}$ are the accretion and formation redshifts, respectively. We find that, at given $z_{\rm peak}$, their MAH is bimodal. Infall halos are dominated by a young population at high redshift and by an old population at low redshift. For the young population, the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution is narrow and peaks at about $1.2$, independent of $z_{\rm peak}$, while for the old population, the peak position and width of the $a_{\rm nf}$ distribution both increases with decreasing $z_{\rm peak}$ and are both larger than those of the young population. This bimodal distribution is found to be closely connected to the two phases in the MAHs of halos. While members of the young population are still in the fast accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$, those of the old population have already entered the slow accretion phase at $z_{\rm peak}$. This bimodal distribution is not found for the whole halo population, nor is it seen in halo merger trees generated with the extended Press-Schechter formalism. The infall halo population at $z_{\rm peak}$ are, on average, younger than the whole halo population of similar masses identified at the same redshift. We discuss the implications of our findings in connection to the bimodal color distribution of observed galaxies and to the link between central and satellite galaxies.
  • The intrinsic alignment of galaxies is an important systematic effect in weak-lensing surveys, which can affect the derived cosmological parameters. One direct way to distinguish different alignment models and quantify their effects on the measurement is to produce mocked weak-lensing surveys. In this work, we use full-sky ray-tracing technique to produce mock images of galaxies from the ELUCID $N$-body simulation run with the WMAP9 cosmology. In our model we assume that the shape of central elliptical galaxy follows that of the dark matter halo, and spiral galaxy follows the halo spin. Using the mocked galaxy images, a combination of galaxy intrinsic shape and the gravitational shear, we compare the predicted tomographic shear correlations to the results of KiDS and DLS. It is found that our predictions stay between the KiDS and DLS results. We rule out a model in which the satellite galaxies are radially aligned with the center galaxy, otherwise the shear-correlations on small scales are too high. Most important, we find that although the intrinsic alignment of spiral galaxies is very weak, they induce a positive correlation between the gravitational shear signal and the intrinsic galaxy orientation (GI). This is because the spiral galaxy is tangentially aligned with the nearby large-scale overdensity, contrary to the radial alignment of elliptical galaxy. Our results explain the origin of detected positive GI term from the weak-lensing surveys. We conclude that in future analysis, the GI model must include the dependence on galaxy types in more detail. And the full-sky mock data introduced in this work can be available if you are interesting.
  • We examine the quenched fraction of central and satellite galaxies as a function of galaxy stellar mass, halo mass, and the matter density of their large scale environment. Matter densities are inferred from our ELUCID simulation, a constrained simulation of local Universe sampled by SDSS, while halo masses and central/satellite classification are taken from the galaxy group catalog of Yang et al. The quenched fraction for the total population increases systematically with the three quantities. We find that the `environmental quenching efficiency', which quantifies the quenched fraction as function of halo mass, is independent of stellar mass. And this independence is the origin of the stellar mass-independence of density-based quenching efficiency, found in previous studies. Considering centrals and satellites separately, we find that the two populations follow similar correlations of quenching efficiency with halo mass and stellar mass, suggesting that they have experienced similar quenching processes in their host halo. We demonstrate that satellite quenching alone cannot account for the environmental quenching efficiency of the total galaxy population and the difference between the two populations found previously mainly arises from the fact that centrals and satellites of the same stellar mass reside, on average, in halos of different mass. After removing these halo-mass and stellar-mass effects, there remains a weak, but significant, residual dependence on environmental density, which is eliminated when halo assembly bias is taken into account. Our results therefore indicate that halo mass is the prime environmental parameter that regulates the quenching of both centrals and satellites.
  • A matched filter technique is applied to the Planck all-sky Compton y-parameter map to measure the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect produced by galaxy groups of different halo masses selected from large redshift surveys in the low-z Universe. Reliable halo mass estimates are available for all the groups, which allows us to bin groups of similar halo masses to investigate how the tSZ effect depends on halo mass over a large mass range. Filters are simultaneously matched for all groups to minimize projection effects. We find that the integrated y-parameter and the hot gas content it implies are consistent with the predictions of the universal pressure profile model only for massive groups above $10^{14}\,{\rm M}_\odot$, but much lower than the model prediction for low-mass groups. The halo mass dependence found is in good agreement with the predictions of a set of simulations that include strong AGN feedback, but simulations including only supernova feedback significantly over predict the hot gas contents in galaxy groups. Our results suggest that hot gas in galaxy groups is either effectively ejected or in phases much below the virial temperatures of the host halos.
  • PS16dtm was classified as a candidate tidal disruption event (TDE) in a dwarf Seyfert 1 galaxy with low-mass black hole ($\sim10^6M\odot$) and has presented various intriguing photometric and spectra characteristics. Using the archival WISE and the newly released NEOWISE data, we found PS16dtm is experiencing a mid-infrared (MIR) flare which started $\sim11$ days before the first optical detection. Interpreting the MIR flare as a dust echo requires close pre-existing dust with a high covering factor, and suggests the optical flare may have brightened slowly for some time before it became bright detectable from the ground. More evidence is given at the later epochs. At the peak of the optical light curve, the new inner radius of the dust torus has grown to much larger size, a factor of 7 of the initial radius due to strong radiation field. At $\sim150$ days after the first optical detection, the dust temperature has dropped well below the sublimation temperature. Other peculiar spectral features shown by PS16dtm are the transient, prominent FeII emission lines and outflows indicated by broad absorption lines detected during the optical flare. Our model explains the enhanced FeII emission from iron newly released from the evaporated dust. The observed broad absorption line outflow could be explained by accelerated gas in the dust torus due to the radiation pressure.
  • In this paper we use high-resolution cosmological simulations to study halo intrinsic alignment and its dependence on mass, formation time and large-scale environment. In agreement with previous studies using N-body simulations, it is found that massive halos have stronger alignment. For given mass, older halos have stronger alignment than younger ones. By identifying the cosmic environment of halo using Hessian matrix, we find that for given mass, halos in cluster regions also have stronger alignment than those in filament. The existing theory has not addressed these dependencies explicitly. In this work we extend the linear alignment model with inclusion of halo bias and find that the halo alignment with its mass and formation time dependence can be explained by halo bias. However, the model can not account for the environment dependence, as it is found that halo bias is lower in cluster and higher in filament. Our results suggest that halo bias and environment are independent factors in determining halo alignment. We also study the halo alignment correlation function and find that halos are strongly clustered along their major axes and less clustered along the minor axes. The correlated halo alignment can extend to scale as large as $100h^{-1}$Mpc where its feature is mainly driven by the baryon acoustic oscillation effect.
  • Halo bias is the one of the key ingredients of the halo models. It was shown at a given redshift to be only dependent, to the first order, on the halo mass. In this study, four types of cosmic web environments: clusters, filaments, sheets and voids are defined within a state of the art high resolution $N$-body simulation. Within those environments, we use both halo-dark matter cross-correlation and halo-halo auto correlation functions to probe the clustering properties of halos. The nature of the halo bias differs strongly among the four different cosmic web environments we describe. With respect to the overall population, halos in clusters have significantly lower biases in the {$10^{11.0}\sim 10^{13.5}h^{-1}\rm M_\odot$} mass range. In other environments however, halos show extremely enhanced biases up to a factor 10 in voids for halos of mass {$\sim 10^{12.0}h^{-1}\rm M_\odot$}. Such a strong cosmic web environment dependence in the halo bias may play an important role in future cosmological and galaxy formation studies. Within this cosmic web framework, the age dependency of halo bias is found to be only significant in clusters and filaments for relatively small halos $\la 10^{12.5}\msunh$.
  • Previous findings show that massive ($> 10^{10} M_{sun}$) star-forming (SF) galaxies usually have an inside-out stellar mass assembly mode. In this paper, we have for the first time selected a sample of 77 massive SF galaxies with an outside-in assembly mode (called targeted sample) from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. For comparison, two control samples are constructed from MaNGA sample matched in stellar mass: a sample of 154 normal SF galaxies and a sample of 62 quiescent galaxies. In contrast to normal SF galaxies, the targeted galaxies appear to be more smooth-like and bulge-dominated, and have smaller size, higher concentration, higher star formation rate and higher gas-phase metallicity as a whole. However, they have larger size and lower concentration than quiescent galaxies. Unlike normal SF sample, the targeted sample exhibits a slightly positive gradient of 4000 \AA\ break and a pronounced negative gradient of H${\alpha}$ equivalent width. Further more, their median surface mass density profile is between that of normal SF sample and quiescent sample, indicating that the gas accretion of quiescent galaxies is not likely to be the main approach for the outside-in assembly mode. Our results suggest that the targeted galaxies are likely in the transitional phase from normal SF galaxies to quiescent galaxies, with rapid on-going central stellar mass assembly (or bulge growth). We discuss several possible formation mechanisms for the outside-in mass assembly mode.
  • We apply a halo-based group finder to four large redshift surveys, the 2MRS, 6dFGS, SDSS and 2dFGRS, to construct group catalogs in the low-redshift Universe. The group finder is based on that of Yang et al. but with an improved halo mass assignment so that it can be applied uniformly to various redshift surveys of galaxies. Halo masses are assigned to groups according to proxies based on the stellar mass/luminosity of member galaxies. The performances of the group finder in grouping galaxies according to common halos and in halo mass assignments are tested using realistic mock samples constructed from hydrodynamical simulations and empirical models of galaxy occupation in dark matter halos. Our group finder finds $\sim 94\%$ of the correct true member galaxies for $90-95\%$ of the groups in the mock samples; the halo masses assigned by the group finder are un-biased with respect to the true halo masses, and have a typical uncertainty of $\sim0.2\,{\rm dex}$. The properties of group catalogs constructed from the observational samples are described and compared with other similar catalogs in the literature.
  • We show that the ratio between the stellar mass of central galaxy and the mass of its host halo, $f_c \equiv M_{*,c}/M_{\rm h}$, can be used as an observable proxy of halo assembly time, in that galaxy groups with higher $f_c$ assembled their masses earlier. Using SDSS groups of Yang et al., we study how $f_c$ correlates with galaxy properties such as color, star formation rate, metallicity, bulge to disk ratio, and size. Central galaxies of a given stellar mass in groups with $f_c>0.02$ tend to be redder in color, more quenched in star formation, smaller in size, and more bulge dominated, as $f_c$ increases. The trends in color and star formation appear to reverse at $f_c<0.02$, reflecting a down-sizing effect that galaxies in massive halos formed their stars earlier although the host halos themselves assembled later (lower $f_c$). No such reversal is seen in the size of elliptical galaxies, suggesting that their assembly follows halo growth more closely than their star formation. Satellite galaxies of a given stellar mass in groups of a given halo mass tend to be redder in color, more quenched in star formation and smaller in size as $f_c$ increases. For a given stellar mass, satellites also tend to be smaller than centrals. The trends are stronger for lower mass groups. For groups more massive than $\sim 10^{13}{\rm M}_\odot$, a weak reversed trend is seen in color and star formation. The observed trends in star formation are qualitatively reproduced by an empirical model based on halo age abundance matching, but not by a semi-analytical model tested here.
  • We investigate the origin, the shape, the scatter, and the cosmic evolution in the observed relationship between specific angular momentum $j_\star$ and the stellar mass $M_\star$ in early-type (ETGs) and late-type galaxies (LTGs). Specifically, we exploit the observed star-formation efficiency and chemical abundance to infer the fraction $f_{\rm inf}$ of baryons that infall toward the central regions of galaxies where star formation can occur. We find $f_{\rm inf}\approx 1$ for LTGs and $\approx 0.4$ for ETGs with an uncertainty of about $0.25$ dex, consistent with a biased collapse. By comparing with the locally observed $j_\star$ vs. $M_\star$ relations for LTGs and ETGs we estimate the fraction $f_j$ of the initial specific angular momentum associated to the infalling gas that is retained in the stellar component: for LTGs we find $f_j\approx 1.11^{+0.75}_{-0.44}$, in line with the classic disc formation picture; for ETGs we infer $f_j\approx 0.64^{+0.20}_{-0.16}$, that can be traced back to a $z<1$ evolution via dry mergers. We also show that the observed scatter in the $j_{\star}$ vs. $M_{\star}$ relation for both galaxy types is mainly contributed by the intrinsic dispersion in the spin parameters of the host dark matter halo. The biased collapse plus mergers scenario implies that the specific angular momentum in the stellar components of ETG progenitors at $z\sim 2$ is already close to the local values, in pleasing agreement with observations. All in all, we argue such a behavior to be imprinted by nature and not nurtured substantially by the environment.
  • The ELUCID project aims to build a series of realistic cosmological simulations that reproduce the spatial and mass distribution of the galaxies as observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This requires powerful reconstruction techniques to create constrained initial conditions. We test the reconstruction method by applying it to several $N$-body simulations. We use 2 medium resolution simulations from each of which three additional constrained $N$-body simulations were produced. We compare the resulting friend of friend catalogs by using the particle indexes as tracers, and quantify the quality of the reconstruction by varying the main smoothing parameter. The cross identification method we use proves to be efficient, and the results suggest that the most massive reconstructed halos are effectively traced from the same Lagrangian regions in the initial conditions. Preliminary time dependence analysis indicates that high mass end halos converge only at a redshift close to the reconstruction redshift. This suggests that, for earlier snapshots, only collections of progenitors may be effectively cross-identified.
  • Broad emission-line outflows of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been proposed for many years but are very difficult to quantitatively study because of the coexistence of the gravitationally-bound and outflow emission. We present detailed analysis of a heavily reddened quasar, SDSS J000610.67+121501.2, whose normal ultraviolet (UV) broad emission lines (BELs) are heavily suppressed by the Dusty Torus as a natural "Coronagraph", thus the blueshifted BELs (BBELs) can be reliably measured. The physical properties of the emission-line outflows are derived as follows: ionization parameter $U \sim 10^{-0.5}$, column density $N_{\rm H}\sim 10^{22.0}$ cm$^{-2}$, covering fraction of $\sim 0.1$ and upper limit density of $n_{\rm H}\sim 10^{5.8}$ cm$^{-3}$. The outflow gases are located at least 41 pc away from the central engine, which suggests that they have expanded to the scale of the dust torus or beyond. Besides, Lya shows a narrow symmetric component, to our surprise, which is undetected in any other lines. After inspecting the narrow emission-line region and the starforming region as the origin of the Lya narrow line, we propose the end-result of outflows, diffusing gases in the larger region, acts as the screen of Lya photons. Future high spatial resolution spectrometry and/or spectropolarimetric observation are needed to make a final clarification.
  • We present a study on the stellar age and metallicity distributions for 1105 galaxies using the STARLIGHT software on MaNGA integral field spectra. We derive age and metallicity gradients by fitting straight lines to the radial profiles, and explore their correlations with total stellar mass M*, NUV-r colour and environments, as identified by both the large scale structure (LSS) type and the local density. We find that the mean age and metallicity gradients are close to zero but slightly negative, which is consistent with the inside-out formation scenario. Within our sample, we find that both the age and metallicity gradients show weak or no correlation with either the LSS type or local density environment. In addition, we also study the environmental dependence of age and metallicity values at the effective radii. The age and metallicity values are highly correlated with M* and NUV-r and are also dependent on LSS type as well as local density. Low-mass galaxies tend to be younger and have lower metallicity in low-density environments while high-mass galaxies are less affected by environment.
  • Using a method to correct redshift space distortion (RSD) for individual galaxies, we mapped the real space distributions of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7 (DR7). We use an ensemble of mock catalogs to demonstrate the reliability of our method. Here as the first paper in a series, we mainly focus on the two point correlation function (2PCF) of galaxies. Overall the 2PCF measured in the reconstructed real space for galaxies brighter than $^{0.1}{\rm M}_r-5\log h=-19.0$ agrees with the direct measurement to an accuracy better than the measurement error due to cosmic variance, if the reconstruction uses the correct cosmology. Applying the method to the SDSS DR7, we construct a real space version of the main galaxy catalog, which contains 396,068 galaxies in the North Galactic Cap with redshifts in the range $0.01 \leq z \leq 0.12$. The Sloan Great Wall, the largest known structure in the nearby Universe, is not as dominant an over-dense structure as appears to be in redshift space. We measure the 2PCFs in reconstructed real space for galaxies of different luminosities and colors. All of them show clear deviations from single power-law forms, and reveal clear transitions from 1-halo to 2-halo terms. A comparison with the corresponding 2PCFs in redshift space nicely demonstrates how RSDs boost the clustering power on large scales (by about $40-50\%$ at scales $\sim 10 h^{-1}{\rm {Mpc}}$) and suppress it on small scales (by about $70-80\%$ at a scale of $0.3 h^{-1}{\rm {Mpc}}$).
  • Using low-redshift (z<0.09) samples of AGNs, normal galaxies and groups of galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we study the environments of type 1 and type 2 AGNs both on small and large scales. Comparisons are made for galaxy samples matched in redshift, $r$-band luminosity, [OIII] luminosity, and also the position in groups (central or satellite). We find that type 2 AGNs and normal galaxies reside in similar environments. Type 1 and type 2 AGNs have similar clustering properties on large scales ($\gtrsim1$Mpc), but at scales smaller than 100 kpc, type 2s have significant more neighbors than type 1s ($3.09\pm0.69$ times more for central AGNs at $\lesssim30$kpc). These results suggest that type 1 and type 2 AGNs are hosted by halos of similar masses, as is also seen directly from the mass distributions of their host groups ($\sim10^{12}h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ for centrals and $\sim10^{13}h^{-1} M_{\odot}$ for satellites). Type~2s have significantly more satellites around them, and the distribution of their satellites is also more centrally concentrated. The host galaxies of both types of AGNs have similar optical properties, but their infrared colors are significantly different. Our results suggest that the simple unified model based solely on torus orientation is not sufficient, but that galaxy interactions in dark matter halos must have played an important role in the formation of the dust structure that obscures AGNs.
  • A galaxy group catalog is constructed from the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) with the use of a halo-based group finder. The halo mass associated with a group is estimated using a `GAP' method based on the luminosity of the central galaxy and its gap with other member galaxies. Tests using mock samples shows that this method is reliable, particularly for poor systems containing only a few members. On average 80% of all the groups have completeness >0.8, and about 65% of the groups have zero contamination. Halo masses are estimated with a typical uncertainty $\sim 0.35\,{\rm dex}$. The application of the group finder to the 2MRS gives 29,904 groups from a total of 43,246 galaxies at $z \leq 0.08$, with 5,286 groups having two or more members. Some basic properties of this group catalog is presented, and comparisons are made with other groups catalogs in overlap regions. With a depth to $z\sim 0.08$ and uniformly covering about 91% of the whole sky, this group catalog provides a useful data base to study galaxies in the local cosmic web, and to reconstruct the mass distribution in the local Universe.
  • Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe II UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe II at wavelengths longer than 2800 {\AA}. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C IV, Al III and Mg II but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C III], S III and He II. We interpret the Fe II lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 {\AA} produces Fe II emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to collisionally excite Fe II lines, accounting for the lack of optical emission. The spectral energy distribution from the UV to the mid-infrared can be modeled as emission from a clumpy dusty torus, with UV emission being reflected/scattered light either by the dusty torus or the outflow. Within this scenario, we estimate a minimum covering factor of the outflows from a few to 20% for the Fe II scattering region, suggesting that Fe II BAL quasars are at a special stage of quasar evolution.
  • A method we developed recently for the reconstruction of the initial density field in the nearby Universe is applied to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. A high-resolution N-body constrained simulation (CS) of the reconstructed initial condition, with $3072^3$ particles evolved in a 500 Mpc/h box, is carried out and analyzed in terms of the statistical properties of the final density field and its relation with the distribution of SDSS galaxies. We find that the statistical properties of the cosmic web and the halo populations are accurately reproduced in the CS. The galaxy density field is strongly correlated with the CS density field, with a bias that depend on both galaxy luminosity and color. Our further investigations show that the CS provides robust quantities describing the environments within which the observed galaxies and galaxy systems reside. Cosmic variance is greatly reduced in the CS so that the statistical uncertainties can be controlled effectively even for samples of small volumes.
  • Based on the star formation histories (SFH) of galaxies in halos of different masses, we develop an empirical model to grow galaxies in dark mattet halos. This model has very few ingredients, any of which can be associated to observational data and thus be efficiently assessed. By applying this model to a very high resolution cosmological $N$-body simulation, we predict a number of galaxy properties that are a very good match to relevant observational data. Namely, for both centrals and satellites, the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) up to redshift $z\simeq4$ and the conditional stellar mass functions (CSMF) in the local universe are in good agreement with observations. In addition, the 2-point correlation is well predicted in the different stellar mass ranges explored by our model. Furthermore, after applying stellar population synthesis models to our stellar composition as a function of redshift, we find that the luminosity functions in $^{0.1}u$, $^{0.1}g$, $^{0.1}r$, $^{0.1}i$ and $^{0.1}z$ bands agree quite well with the SDSS observational results down to an absolute magnitude at about -17.0. The SDSS conditional luminosity functions (CLF) itself is predicted well. Finally, the cold gas is derived from the star formation rate (SFR) to predict the HI gas mass within each mock galaxy. We find a remarkably good match to observed HI-to-stellar mass ratios. These features ensure that such galaxy/gas catalogs can be used to generate reliable mock redshift surveys.
  • Large scale tidal field estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos is used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependencies are only through the peak height, {\nu}. The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of {\nu} indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.