• Our poor understanding of the boundaries of convective cores generates large uncertainties on the extent of these cores and thus on stellar ages. Our aim is to use asteroseismology to consistently measure the extent of convective cores in a sample of main-sequence stars whose masses lie around the mass-limit for having a convective core. We first test and validate a seismic diagnostic that was proposed to probe in a model-dependent way the extent of convective cores using the so-called $r_{010}$ ratios, which are built with $l=0$ and $l=1$ modes. We apply this procedure to 24 low-mass stars chosen among Kepler targets to optimize the efficiency of this diagnostic. For this purpose, we compute grids of stellar models with both the CESAM2k and MESA evolution codes, where the extensions of convective cores are modeled either by an instantaneous mixing or as a diffusion process. Among the selected targets, we are able to unambiguously detect convective cores in eight stars and we obtain seismic measurements of the extent of the mixed core in these targets with a good agreement between the CESAM2k and MESA codes. By performing optimizations using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, we then obtain estimates of the amount of extra-mixing beyond the core that is required in CESAM2k to reproduce seismic observations for these eight stars and we show that this can be used to propose a calibration of this quantity. This calibration depends on the prescription chosen for the extra-mixing, but we find that it should be valid also for the code MESA, provided the same prescription is used. This study constitutes a first step towards the calibration of the extension of convective cores in low-mass stars, which will help reduce the uncertainties on the ages of these stars.
  • Due to the strong magnetic field and related abnormal surface layers existing in rapidly oscillating Ap stars, systematic errors are likely to be present when determining their effective temperatures, which potentially compromises asteroseismic studies of these pulsators. Using long-baseline interferometry, our goal is to determine accurate angular diameters of a number of roAp targets to provide a temperature calibration for these stars. We obtained interferometric observations of 10 Aql with the visible spectrograph VEGA at the CHARA array. We determined a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.275+/-0.009 mas and deduced a linear radius of 2.32+/-0.09 R_sun. We estimated the star's bolometric flux and used it, in combination with its parallax and angular diameter, to determine the star's luminosity and effective temperature. For two data sets of bolometric flux we derived an effective temperature of 7800+/-170 K and a luminosity of 18+/-1 L_sun or of 8000+/-210 K and 19+/-2 L_sun. We used these fundamental parameters together with the large frequency separation to constrain the mass and the age of 10 Aql, using the CESAM stellar evolution code. Assuming a solar chemical composition and ignoring all kinds of diffusion and settling of elements, we obtained a mass of 1.92 M_sun and an age of 780 Gy or a mass of 1.95 M_sun and an age of 740 Gy, depending on the considered bolometric flux. For the first time, we managed to determine an accurate angular diameter for a star smaller than 0.3 mas and to derive its fundamental parameters. In particular, by only combining our interferometric data and the bolometric flux, we derived an effective temperature that can be compared to those derived from atmosphere models. Such fundamental parameters can help for testing the mechanism responsible for the excitation of the oscillations observed in the magnetic pulsating stars.
  • The evolved solar-type stars 16 Cyg A & B have long been studied as solar analogs, yielding a glimpse into the future of our own Sun. The orbital period of the binary system is too long to provide meaningful dynamical constraints on the stellar properties, but asteroseismology can help because the stars are among the brightest in the Kepler field. We present an analysis of three months of nearly uninterrupted photometry of 16 Cyg A & B from the Kepler space telescope. We extract a total of 46 and 41 oscillation frequencies for the two components respectively, including a clear detection of octupole (l=3) modes in both stars. We derive the properties of each star independently using the Asteroseismic Modeling Portal, fitting the individual oscillation frequencies and other observational constraints simultaneously. We evaluate the systematic uncertainties from an ensemble of results generated by a variety of stellar evolution codes and fitting methods. The optimal models derived by fitting each component individually yield a common age (t=6.8+/-0.4 Gyr) and initial composition (Z_i=0.024+/-0.002, Y_i=0.25+/-0.01) within the uncertainties, as expected for the components of a binary system, bolstering our confidence in the reliability of asteroseismic techniques. The longer data sets that will ultimately become available will allow future studies of differential rotation, convection zone depths, and long-term changes due to stellar activity cycles.
  • Physical processes working in the stellar interiors as well as the evolution of stars depend on some fundamental stellar properties, such as mass, radius, luminosity, and chemical abundances. A classical way to test stellar interior models is to compare the predicted and observed location of a star on theoretical evolutionary tracks in a H-R diagram. This requires the best possible determinations of stellar mass, radius, luminosity and abundances. To derive its fundamental parameters, we observed the well-known rapidly oscillating Ap star, $\gamma$ Equ, using the visible spectro-interferometer VEGA installed on the optical CHARA array. We computed the calibrated squared visibility and derived the limb-darkened diameter. We used the whole energy flux distribution, the parallax and this angular diameter to determine the luminosity and the effective temperature of the star. We obtained a limb-darkened angular diameter of 0.564~$\pm$~0.017~mas and deduced a radius of $R$~=~2.20~$\pm$~0.12~${\rm R_{\odot}}$. Without considering the multiple nature of the system, we derived a bolometric flux of $(3.12\pm 0.21)\times 10^{-7}$ erg~cm$^{-2}$~s$^{-1}$ and an effective temperature of 7364~$\pm$~235~K, which is below the effective temperature that has been previously determined. Under the same conditions we found a luminosity of $L$~=~12.8~$\pm$~1.4~${\rm L_{\odot}}$. When the contribution of the closest companion to the bolometric flux is considered, we found that the effective temperature and luminosity of the primary star can be, respectively, up to $\sim$~100~K and up to $\sim$~0.8~L$_\odot$ smaller than the values mentioned above.These new values of the radius and effective temperature should bring further constraints on the asteroseismic modelling of the star.