• In this paper we describe the architecture of a Platform as a Service (PaaS) oriented to computing and data analysis. In order to clarify the choices we made, we explain the features using practical examples, applied to several known usage patterns in the area of HEP computing. The proposed architecture is devised to provide researchers with a unified view of distributed computing infrastructures, focusing in facilitating seamless access. In this respect the Platform is able to profit from the most recent developments for computing and processing large amounts of data, and to exploit current storage and preservation technologies, with the appropriate mechanisms to ensure security and privacy.
  • We present the current status of a revised strategy to compute the running of renormalized quark masses in QCD with three flavours of massless O(a) improved Wilson quarks. The strategy employed uses the standard finite-size scaling method in the Schr\"odinger functional and accommodates for the non-perturbative scheme-switch which becomes necessary at intermediate renormalized couplings as discussed in [arXiv:1411.7648].
  • We present a new environment for computations in particle physics phenomenology employing recent developments in cloud computing. On this environment users can create and manage "virtual" machines on which the phenomenology codes/tools can be deployed easily in an automated way. We analyze the performance of this environment based on "virtual" machines versus the utilization of "real" physical hardware. In this way we provide a qualitative result for the influence of the host operating system on the performance of a representative set of applications for phenomenology calculations.
  • It is shown, by means of Monte Carlo simulation and Finite Size Scaling analysis, that the Heisenberg spin glass undergoes a finite-temperature phase transition in three dimensions. There is a single critical temperature, at which both a spin glass and a chiral glass orderings develop. The Monte Carlo algorithm, adapted from lattice gauge theory simulations, makes possible to thermalize lattices of size L=32, larger than in any previous spin glass simulation in three dimensions. High accuracy is reached thanks to the use of the Marenostrum supercomputer. The large range of system sizes studied allow us to consider scaling corrections.
  • Dedicated machines designed for specific computational algorithms can outperform conventional computers by several orders of magnitude. In this note we describe {\it Ianus}, a new generation FPGA based machine and its basic features: hardware integration and wide reprogrammability. Our goal is to build a machine that can fully exploit the performance potential of new generation FPGA devices. We also plan a software platform which simplifies its programming, in order to extend its intended range of application to a wide class of interesting and computationally demanding problems. The decision to develop a dedicated processor is a complex one, involving careful assessment of its performance lead, during its expected lifetime, over traditional computers, taking into account their performance increase, as predicted by Moore's law. We discuss this point in detail.
  • In a numerical Monte Carlo simulation of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with light dynamical gluinos the low energy features of the dynamics as confinement and bound state mass spectrum are investigated. The motivation is supersymmetry at vanishing gluino mass. The performance of the applied two-step multi-bosonic dynamical fermion algorithm is discussed.
  • We study the pure compact U(1) gauge theory with the extended Wilson action (\beta, \gamma couplings) by finite size scaling techniques, in lattices ranging from L=6 to L=24 in the region of \gamma <= 0 with toroidal and spherical topologies. The phase transition presents a double peak structure which survives in the thermodynamical limit in the torus. In the sphere the evidence support the idea of a weaker, but still first order, phase transition. For negative values of gamma the transition becomes weaker and larger lattices are needed to find its asymptotic behaviour. Along the transient region the behaviour is the typical one of a weak first order transition for both topologies, with a region where 1/d < nu < 0.5, which becomes nu compatible with 1/d when larger lattices are used.
  • Aug. 1, 1997 hep-lat
    We investigate the properties of the Confinement-Higgs phase transition in the SU(2)-Higgs model. The system is shown to exhibit a transient behavior up to L=24 along which, the order of the phase transition cannot be discerned. In order to get a global vision on the problem, we have introduced a second (next-to-nearest neighbors) gauge-Higgs coupling (k2). On this extended parameter space we find a line of phase transitions becoming increasely weak as the standard case is approached (k2 = 0). From the global behavior on this parameter space we conclude that the transition is also first order in the standard case.
  • We present antiferromagnetism as a mechanism capable of modifying substantially the phase diagram and the critical behaviour of statistical mechanical models. This is particularly relevant in four dimensions, due to the connection between second order transition points and the continuum limit as a quantum field theory. We study three models with an antiferromagnetic interaction: the Ising and the O(4) Models with a second neighbour negative coupling, and the $\RP{2}$ Model. Different conclusions are obtained depending on the model.
  • We study a message passing model, applicable also to traffic problems. The model is implemented in a discrete lattice, where particles move towards their destination, with fluctuations around the minimal distance path. A repulsive interaction between particles is introduced in order to avoid the appearance of traffic jam. We have studied the parameter space finding regions of fluid traffic, and saturated ones, being separated by abrupt changes. The improvement of the system performance is also explored, by the introduction of a non-constant potential acting on the particles. Finally, we deal with the behavior of the system when temporary failures in the transmission occurs.
  • We have numerically studied the trapping problem in a two-dimensional lattice where particles are continuously generated. We have introduced interaction between particles and directionality of their movement. This model presents a critical behaviour with a rich phase structure similar to spin systems. We interpret a change in the asymptotic density of particles as a phase transition. For high directionality the change is abrupt, possibly of first order. For small directionality the phase transition is of higher order. We have computed the phase diagram, the volume dependence of the critical point, and the relaxation time of the system in the large volume limit.