• Since its discovery in 2008, the Andromeda galaxy nova M31N 2008-12a has been observed in eruption every single year. This unprecedented frequency indicates an extreme object, with a massive white dwarf and a high accretion rate, which is the most promising candidate for the single-degenerate progenitor of a type-Ia supernova known to date. The previous three eruptions of M31N 2008-12a have displayed remarkably homogeneous multi-wavelength properties: (i) From a faint peak, the optical light curve declined rapidly by two magnitudes in less than two days; (ii) Early spectra showed initial high velocities that slowed down significantly within days and displayed clear He/N lines throughout; (iii) The supersoft X-ray source (SSS) phase of the nova began extremely early, six days after eruption, and only lasted for about two weeks. In contrast, the peculiar 2016 eruption was clearly different. Here we report (i) the considerable delay in the 2016 eruption date, (ii) the significantly shorter SSS phase, and (iii) the brighter optical peak magnitude (with a hitherto unobserved cusp shape). Early theoretical models suggest that these three different effects can be consistently understood as caused by a lower quiescence mass-accretion rate. The corresponding higher ignition mass caused a brighter peak in the free-free emission model. The less-massive accretion disk experienced greater disruption, consequently delaying re-establishment of effective accretion. Without the early refueling, the SSS phase was shortened. Observing the next few eruptions will determine whether the properties of the 2016 outburst make it a genuine outlier in the evolution of M31N 2008-12a.
  • The Andromeda Galaxy recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a had been observed in eruption ten times, including yearly eruptions from 2008-2014. With a measured recurrence period of $P_\mathrm{rec}=351\pm13$ days (we believe the true value to be half of this) and a white dwarf very close to the Chandrasekhar limit, M31N 2008-12a has become the leading pre-explosion supernova type Ia progenitor candidate. Following multi-wavelength follow-up observations of the 2013 and 2014 eruptions, we initiated a campaign to ensure early detection of the predicted 2015 eruption, which triggered ambitious ground and space-based follow-up programs. In this paper we present the 2015 detection; visible to near-infrared photometry and visible spectroscopy; and ultraviolet and X-ray observations from the Swift observatory. The LCOGT 2m (Hawaii) discovered the 2015 eruption, estimated to have commenced at Aug. $28.28\pm0.12$ UT. The 2013-2015 eruptions are remarkably similar at all wavelengths. New early spectroscopic observations reveal short-lived emission from material with velocities $\sim13000$ km s$^{-1}$, possibly collimated outflows. Photometric and spectroscopic observations of the eruption provide strong evidence supporting a red giant donor. An apparently stochastic variability during the early super-soft X-ray phase was comparable in amplitude and duration to past eruptions, but the 2013 and 2015 eruptions show evidence of a brief flux dip during this phase. The multi-eruption Swift/XRT spectra show tentative evidence of high-ionization emission lines above a high-temperature continuum. Following Henze et al. (2015a), the updated recurrence period based on all known eruptions is $P_\mathrm{rec}=174\pm10$ d, and we expect the next eruption of M31N 2008-12a to occur around mid-Sep. 2016.
  • The Andromeda Galaxy recurrent nova M31N 2008-12a had been caught in eruption eight times. The inter-eruption period of M31N 2008-12a is ~1 year, making it the most rapidly recurring system known, and a strong single-degenerate Type Ia Supernova progenitor candidate. Following the 2013 eruption, a campaign was initiated to detect the predicted 2014 eruption and to then perform high cadence optical photometric and spectroscopic monitoring using ground-based telescopes, along with rapid UV and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite. Here we report the results of a high cadence multicolour optical monitoring campaign, the spectroscopic evolution, and the UV photometry. We also discuss tantalising evidence of a potentially related, vastly-extended, nebulosity. The 2014 eruption was discovered, before optical maximum, on October 2, 2014. We find that the optical properties of M31N 2008-12a evolve faster than all Galactic recurrent novae known, and all its eruptions show remarkable similarity both photometrically and spectroscopically. Optical spectra were obtained as early as 0.26 days post maximum, and again confirm the nova nature of the eruption. A significant deceleration of the inferred ejecta expansion velocity is observed which may be caused by interaction of the ejecta with surrounding material, possibly a red giant wind. We find a low ejected mass and low ejection velocity, which are consistent with high mass-accretion rate, high mass white dwarf, and short recurrence time models of novae. We encourage additional observations, especially around the predicted time of the next eruption, towards the end of 2015.
  • The M 31 nova M31N 2008-12a was recently found to be a recurrent nova (RN) with a recurrence time of about 1 year. This is by far the fastest recurrence time scale of any known RNe. Our optical monitoring programme detected the predicted 2014 outburst of M31N 2008-12a in early October. We immediately initiated an X-ray/UV monitoring campaign with Swift to study the multiwavelength evolution of the outburst. We monitored M31N 2008-12a with daily Swift observations for 20 days after discovery, covering the entire supersoft X-ray source (SSS) phase. We detected SSS emission around day six after outburst. The SSS state lasted for approximately two weeks until about day 19. M31N 2008-12a was a bright X-ray source with a high blackbody temperature. The X-ray properties of this outburst were very similar to the 2013 eruption. Combined X-ray spectra show a fast rise and decline of the effective blackbody temperature. The short-term X-ray light curve showed strong, aperiodic variability which decreased significantly after about day 14. Overall, the X-ray properties of M31N 2008-12a are consistent with the average population properties of M 31 novae. The optical and X-ray light curves can be scaled uniformly to show similar time scales as those of the Galactic RNe U Sco or RS Oph. The SSS evolution time scales and effective temperatures are consistent with a high-mass WD. We predict the next outburst of M31N 2008-12a to occur in autumn 2015.
  • Another outburst of the recurrent M31 nova M31N 2008-12a was announced in late November 2013. Optical data suggest an unprecedentedly short recurrence time of approximately one year. In this Letter we address the X-ray properties of M31N 2008-12a. We requested Swift monitoring observations shortly after the optical discovery. We estimated source count rates and extracted X-ray spectra from the resulting data. The corresponding ultraviolet (UV) data was also analysed. M31N 2008-12a was clearly detected as a bright supersoft X-ray source (SSS) only six days after the well-constrained optical discovery. It displayed a short SSS phase of two weeks duration and an exceptionally hot X-ray spectrum with an effective blackbody temperature of ~97 eV. During the SSS phase the X-ray light curve displayed significant variability that might have been accompanied by spectral variations. The very early X-ray variability was found to be anti-correlated with simultaneous variations in the UV flux. The X-ray properties of M31N 2008-12a coherently point towards a high-mass white dwarf in the nova system. This object might be a promising Type Ia supernova progenitor. We re-discovered additional X-ray detections of M31N 2008-12a that are consistent with our data and increase the number of known nova outbursts to seven. This nova is an exceptional object that merits further attention in the future.
  • Three-dimensional hydrodynamic calculations are performed in order to investigate mass transfer in a close binary system, in which one component undergoes mass loss through a wind. The mass ratio is assumed to be unity. The radius of the mass-losing star is taken to be about a quarter of the separation between the two stars. Calculations are performed for gases with a ratio of specific heats gamma=1.01 and 5/3. Mass loss is assumed to be thermally driven so that the other parameter is the sound speed of the gas on the mass-losing star. Here, we focus our attention on two features: flow patterns and mass accretion ratio, which we define as the ratio of the mass accretion rate onto the companion to the mass loss rate from the mass-losing primary star. We characterize the flow by the mean normal velocity of wind on the critical Roche surface of the mass-losing star, Vr. When Vr<0.4 A Omega, where A and Omega are the separation between the two stars and the angular orbital frequency of the binary, respectively, we obtain Roche-lobe over-flow (RLOF), while for Vr>0.7 A Omega we observe wind accretion. We find very complex flow patterns in between these two extreme cases. We derive an empirical formula of the mass accretion ratio in the low and in the high velocity regime.
  • We first present a summary of our numerical work on accretion discs in close binary systems. Our recent studies on numerical simulations of the surface flow on the mass-losing star in a close binary star is then reviewed.
  • A key question for supernova cosmology is whether the peak luminosities of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are sufficiently free from the effects of cosmic and galactic evolution. To answer this question, we review the currently popular scenario of SN Ia progenitors, i.e., the single degenerate scenario for the Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) models. We identify the progenitor's evolution with two channels: (1) the WD+RG (red-giant) and (2) the WD+MS (near main-sequence He-rich star) channels. The strong wind from accreting WDs plays a key role, which yields important age and metallicity effects on the evolution. We suggest that the variation of the carbon mass fraction $X$(C) in the C+O WD (or the variation of the initial WD mass) causes the diversity of SN Ia brightness. This model can explain the observed dependence of SNe Ia brightness on the galaxy types. We then predict how SN Ia brightness evolves along the redshift (with changing metallicity and age) for elliptical and spiral galaxies. Such evolutionary effects along the redshift can be corrected as has been made for local SNe Ia. We also touch on several related issues: (1) the abundance pattern of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies in relation to the metallicity effect on SNe Ia, (2) effects of angular momentum brought into the WD in relation to the diversities and the fate of double degenerates, and (3) possible presence of helium in the peculiar SN Ia 2000cx in relation to the sub-Chandrasekhar mass model.
  • Aspherical explosion models for the hypernova (hyper-energetic supernova) SN 1998bw are presented. Nucleosynthesis in aspherical explosions is examined with a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code and a detailed nuclear reaction network. Aspherical explosions lead to a strong $\alpha$-rich freezeout, thus enhancing the abundance ratios [$^{44}$Ca, $^{48}$Ti, and $^{64}$Zn / Fe] in the ejecta. The nebular line profiles of the Fe-dominated blend near 5200 \AA and of [\OI] 6300,6363 \AA are calculated and compared with the observed late time spectra of SN 1998bw. Compared with the spherical model, the unusual features of the observed nebular spectra can be better explained if SN 1998bw is a strongly aspherical explosion with a kinetic energy of $\sim 10^{52}$ ergs viewed from near the jet direction.
  • Observations suggest that the properties of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) may depend on environmental characteristics, such as morphology, metallicity, and age of host galaxies. The influence of these environmental properties on the resulting SNe Ia is studied in this paper. First it is shown that the carbon mass fraction X(C) in the C+O white dwarf SN Ia progenitors tends to be smaller for lower metallicity and older the binary system age. It is then suggested that the variation of X(C) causes the diversity in the brightness of SNe Ia: a smaller X(C) leads to a dimmer SN Ia. Further studies of the propagation of the turbulent flame are necessary to confirm this relation. Our model for the SN Ia progenitors then predicts that when the progenitors belong to an older population or to a low metallicity environment, the number of bright SNe Ia is reduced, so that the variation in brightness among the SNe Ia is also smaller. Thus our model can explain why the mean SN Ia brightness and its dispersion depend on the morphology of the host galaxies and on the distance of the SN from the center of the galaxy. It is further predicted that at higher redshift (z >~ 1) both the the mean brightness of SNe Ia and its variation should be smaller in spiral galaxies than in elliptical galaxies. These variations are within the range observed in nearby SNe Ia. In so far as the variation in X(C) is the most important cause for the diversity among SNe Ia, the light curve shape method currently used to determine the absolute magnitude of SNe Ia can be applied also to high redshift SNe Ia.
  • Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities in the explosion of SN 1993J are investigated by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. It is found that the extent of mixing is sensitive to the progenitor's core mass and the envelope mass. Because the helium core mass (3 - 4 \ms) is smaller than that of SN 1987A, R-T instabilities at the He/C+O interfaces develop to induce a large scale mixing in the helium core, while the instability is relatively weak at the H/He interface due to the small envelope mass. The predicted abundance distribution, in particular the amount of the \ni~ mixing, is compared with those required in the theoretical light curves and the late time optical spectra. This enables us to specify the progenitor of SN 1993J in some detail.