• We have demonstrated experimentally that recently developed gaseous detectors combined with solid or gaseous photo-cathodes have exceptionally low noise and high quantum efficiency for UV photons while being solar blind. For this reason they can be used for the detection of weak UV sources in daylight conditions. These detectors are extremely robust, can operate in poor gas conditions and are cheap. We present the first results of their applications to hyper-spectroscopy and flame detection in daylight conditions.
  • In this study we present first results from a new detector of UV photons: a thick gaseous electron multiplier (GEM) with resistive electrodes, combined with CsI or CsTe/CsI photocathodes. The hole type structure considerably suppresses the photon and ion feedback, whereas the resistive electrodes protect the detector and the readout electronics from damage by any eventual discharges. This device reaches higher gains than a previously developed photosensitive RPC and could be used not only for the imaging of UV sources, flames or Cherenkov light, for example, but also for the detection of X-rays and charged particles.
  • Hyperspectroscopy is a new method of surface image taking, providing simultaneously high position and spectral resolutions which allow one to make some conclusions about chemical compositions of the surfaces. We are now studying applications of the hyperspctroscopic technique to be used for medicine. This may allow one to develop early diagnostics of some illnesses, as for example, skin cancer. For image taking advanced MCPs are currently used, sensitive in the spectral interval of 450-850 nm. One of the aims of this work is to extend the hyperspectrocpic method to the UV region of spectra: 185-280 nm. For this we have developed and successfully tested innovative 1D and 2D UV sealed photosensitive gaseous detectors with resistive electrodes. These detectors are superior MCPs due to the very low rate of noise pulses and thus due to the high signal to noise ratio. Other important features of these detectors are that they have excellent position resolutions - 30 micron in digital form, are vibration stable and are spark protected. The first results from the application of these detectors for spectroscopy, hyperspectroscopy and the flame detection are presented.
  • There are several applications which require high position resolution UV imaging. For these applications we have developed and successfully tested a new version of a 2D UV single photon imaging detector based on a microgap RPC. The main features of such a detectors is the high position resolution - 30 micron in digital form and the high quantum efficiency (1-8% in the spectral interval of 220-140 nm). Additionally, they are spark- protected and can operate without any feedback problems at high gains, close to a streamer mode. In attempts to extend the sensitivity of RPCs to longer wavelengths we have successfully tested the operation of the first sealed parallel-plate gaseous detectors with CsTe photocathodes. Finally, the comparison with other types of photosensitive detectors is given and possible fields of applications are identified.
  • Nowadays, commonly used Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) have counting rate capabilities of ~10E4Hz/cm2 and position resolutions of ~1cm. We have developed small prototypes of RPCs (5x5 and 10x10cm2) having rate capabilities of up to 10E7Hz/cm2 and position resolutions of 50 micron("on line" without application of any treatment method like "center of gravity"). The breakthrough in achieving extraordinary rate and position resolutions was only possible after solving several serious problems: RPC cleaning and assembling technology, aging, spurious pulses and afterpulses, discharges in the amplification gap and along the spacers. High-rate, high-position resolution RPCs can find a wide range of applications in many different fields, for example in medical imaging. RPCs with the cathodes coated by CsI photosensitive layer can detect ultraviolet photons with a position resolution that is better than ~30 micron. Such detectors can also be used in many applications, for example in the focal plane of high resolution vacuum spectrographs or as image scanners.
  • We have developed and successfully used several innovative designs of detectors with solid photocathodes. The main advantage of these detectors is that rather high gains (>10E4) can be achieved in a single multiplication step. This is possible by, for instance, exploiting the secondary electron multiplication and limiting the energy of the steamers by distributed resistivity. The single step approach also allows a very good position resolution to be achieved in some devices: 50 micron on line without applying any treatment method (like center of gravity). The main focus of our report is new fields of applications for these detectors and the optimization of their designs for such purposes.
  • Currently a revolution is happening in the development of gaseous detectors of photons and particles. Recently developed gaseous detectors with solid photocathodes are now replacing photosensitive wire chambers, which dominated for years in high energy and space flight experiments. We will review the main developments in this field as well as their applications in high-energy physics, medicine, industry and plasma diagnostics. New results on solid photocathodes coupled with gaseous micropattern/wire detectors will also be presented.