• Theoretical and numerical modeling of dark-matter halo assembly predicts that the most luminous galaxies at high redshift are surrounded by overdensities of fainter companions. We test this prediction with HST observations acquired by our Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies (BoRG) survey, which identified four very bright z~8 candidates as Y-dropout sources in four of the 23 non-contiguous WFC3 fields observed. We extend here the search for Y-dropouts to fainter luminosities (M_* galaxies with M_AB\sim-20), with detections at >5sigma confidence (compared to >8sigma confidence adopted earlier) identifying 17 new candidates. We demonstrate that there is a correlation between number counts of faint and bright Y-dropouts at >99.84% confidence. Field BoRG58, which contains the best bright z\sim8 candidate (M_AB=-21.3), has the most significant overdensity of faint Y-dropouts. Four new sources are located within 70arcsec (corresponding to 3.1 comoving Mpc at z=8) from the previously known brighter z\sim8 candidate. The overdensity of Y-dropouts in this field has a physical origin to high confidence (p>99.975%), independent of completeness and contamination rate of the Y-dropout selection. We modeled the overdensity by means of cosmological simulations and estimate that the principal dark matter halo has mass M_h\sim(4-7)x10^11Msun (\sim5sigma density peak) and is surrounded by several M_h\sim10^11Msun halos which could host the fainter dropouts. In this scenario, we predict that all halos will eventually merge into a M_h>2x10^14Msun galaxy cluster by z=0. Follow-up observations with ground and space based telescopes are required to secure the z\sim8 nature of the overdensity, discover new members, and measure their precise redshift.
  • This paper has been removed by arXiv admin because it was an erroneous duplicate of astro-ph/9411031.
  • One third of present-day spirals host optically visible strong bars that drive their dynamical evolution. However, the fundamental question of how bars evolve over cosmological times has yet to be addressed, and even the frequency of bars at intermediate redshifts remains controversial. We investigate the frequency of bars out to z~1.0 drawing on a sample of 1590 galaxies from the GEMS survey, which provides morphologies from HST ACS two-color images, and highly accurate redshifts from the COMBO-17 survey. We identify spiral galaxies using the Sersic index, concentration parameter, and rest-frame color. We characterize bars and disks by fitting ellipses to F606W and F850LP images, taking advantage of the two bands to minimize bandpass shifting. We exclude highly inclined (i>60 deg) galaxies to ensure reliable morphological classifications, and apply completeness cuts of M_v <= -19.3 and -20.6. More than 40% of the bars that we detect have semi major axes a<0.5" and would be easily missed in earlier surveys without the small PSF of ACS. The bars that we can reliably detect are fairly strong (with ellipticities e>=0.4) and have a in the range ~1.2-13 kpc. We find that the optical fraction of such strong bars remains at ~(30% +- 6%) from the present-day out to look-back times of 2-6 Gyr (z~0.2-0.7) and 6-8 Gyr (z~0.7-1.0); it certainly shows no sign of a drastic decline at z>0.7. Our findings of a large and similar bar fraction at these three epochs favor scenarios in which cold gravitationally unstable disks are already in place by z~1, and where on average bars have a long lifetime (well above 2 Gyr). The distributions of structural bar properties in the two slices are, however, not statistically identical and therefore allow for the possibility that the bar strengths and sizes may evolve over time.
  • Bars drive the dynamical evolution of disk galaxies by redistributing mass and angular momentum, and they are ubiquitous in present-day spirals. Early studies of the Hubble Deep Field reported a dramatic decline in the rest-frame optical bar fraction f_opt to below 5% at redshifts z>0.7, implying that disks at these epochs are fundamentally different from present-day spirals. The GEMS bar project, based on ~8300 galaxies with HST-based morphologies and accurate redshifts over the range 0.2-1.1, aims at constraining the evolution and impact of bars over the last 8 Gyr. We present early results indicating that f_opt remains nearly constant at ~30% over the range z=0.2-1.1,corresponding to lookback times of ~2.5-8 Gyr. The bars detected at z>0.6 are primarily strong with ellipticities of 0.4-0.8. Remarkably, the bar fraction and range of bar sizes observed at z>0.6 appear to be comparable to the values measured in the local Universe for bars of corresponding strengths. Implications for bar evolution models are discussed.
  • We present a deep ASCA observation of a Broad Absorption Line Quasar (BALQSO) PG0946+301. The source was clearly detected in one of the gas imaging spectrometers, but not in any other detector. If BALQSOs have intrinsic X-ray spectra similar to normal radio-quiet quasars, our observations imply that there is Thomson thick X-ray absorption (N_H >~10^{24} cm^{-2}) toward PG0946+301. This is the largest column density estimated so far toward a BALQSO. The absorber must be at least partially ionized and may be responsible for attenuation in the optical and UV. If the Thomson optical depth toward BALQSOs is close to one, as inferred here, then spectroscopy in hard X-rays with large telescopes like XMM would be feasible.
  • We carry out a detailed orbit analysis of gravitational potentials selected at different times from an evolving self-consistent model galaxy consisting of a two-component disk (stars+gas) and a live halo. The results are compared with a pure stellar model, subject to nearly identical initial conditions, which are chosen as to make the models develop a large scale stellar bar. The bars are also subject to hose-pipe (buckling) instability which modifies the vertical structure of the disk. The diverging morphological evolution of both models is explained in terms of gas radial inflow, the resulting change in the gravitational potential at smaller radii, and the subsequent modification of the main families of orbits, both in and out of the disk plane. We find that dynamical instabilities become milder in the presence of the gas component, and that the stability of planar and 3D stellar orbits is strongly affected by the related changes in the potential -- both are destabilized with the gas accumulation at the center. This is reflected in the overall lower amplitude of the bar mode and in the substantial weakening of the bar, which appears to be a gradual process. The vertical buckling of the bar is much less pronounced and the characteristic peanut shape of the galactic bulge almost disappears when there is a substantial gas inflow towards the center. Milder instability results in a smaller bulge whose basic parameters are in agreement with observations. We also find that the overall evolution in the model with a gas component is accelerated due to the larger central mass concentration and resulting decrease in the characteristic dynamical time.
  • We analyze the results of long-term observations of broad-line region (BLR) in the Sy1 galaxy NGC 5548 and provide a critical comparison with the predictions of a hydromagnetically-driven outflow model of Emmering, Blandford and Shlosman. This model was used to generate a time series of CIV line profiles that have responded to a time varying continuum. The model includes cloud emission anisotropy, cloud obscuration, a CLOUDY-generated emissivity function and a narrow-line component used to generate the line profiles, and is driven with continuum input based on the monitoring campaigns of NGC 5548. The line strengths, profiles and lags are compared with the observations. It reproduces the basic features of CIV line variability in this AGN without varying the model parameters. The best fit model provides the effective size, the dominant geometry, the emissivity distribution and the 3D velocity field of the CIV BLR and constrains the mass of the central BH. The inner part of the wind appears to be responsible for the anisotropically emitted CIV line, while its outer part remains dusty and molecular, thus having similar spectral characteristics to a molecular torus, although its dynamics is fundamentally different. In addition, our model predicts a differential response across the CIV line profile, producing a red-side-first response in the mid-wings followed by the blue mid-wing and by the line core. Based on the comparison of data and model cross-correlation functions and 1D and 2D transfer functions, we find that the rotating outflow model is compatible with observations of the BLR in NGC 5548.
  • We investigate the dynamical response of stellar orbits in a rotating barred galaxy potential to the perturbation by a nuclear gaseous ring. The change in 3D periodic orbit families is examined as the gas accumulates between the inner Lindblad resonances. It is found that the phase space allowable to the x2 family of orbits is substantially increased and a vertical instability strip appears with the growing mass of the ring. A significant distortion of the x1 orbits is observed in the vicinity of the ring, which leads to the intersection between orbits with different values of the Jacobi integral. We also examine the dependence of the orbital response to the eccentricity and alignment of the ring with the bar. Misalignment between an oval ring and a bar can leave observational footprints in the form of twisted near-infrared isophotes in the vicinity of the ring. It is inferred that a massive nuclear ring acts to weaken and dissolve the stellar bar exterior to the ring, whereas only weakly affecting the orbits interior to the inner Lindblad resonances. Consequences for gas evolution in the circumnuclear regions of barred galaxies are discussed as well.
  • High-resolution NIR and optical images are used to constrain a dynamical model of the circumnuclear star forming (SF) region in the barred galaxy M100 (=NGC 4321). Subarcsecond resolution allowed us to distinguish important morphological details which are easily misinterpreted when using images at lower resolution. Small leading arms observed in our K-band image of the nuclear region are reproduced in the gas flow in our model, and lead us to believe that part of the K light comes from young stars, which trace the gas flow.
  • We investigate the dynamical response of stellar orbits in a rotating barred galaxy potential to the perturbation by a nuclear gaseous ring. The change in 3D periodic orbit families is examined as the gas accumulates near the inner Lindblad resonance. It is found that the x2/x3 loop extends to higher Jacobi energy and a vertical instability strip forms in each family. These strips are connected by a symmetric/anti-symmetric pair of 2:2:1 3D orbital families. A significant distortion of the x1 orbits is observed in the vicinity of the ring, which leads to the intersection between orbits over a large range of the Jacobi integral. We also find that a moderately elliptical ring oblique to the stellar bar produces significant phase shifts in the x1 orbital response.
  • We use a free-energy minimization approach to describe the secular and dynamical instabilities as well as the bifurcations along equilibrium sequences of rotating, self-gravitating fluid systems. Our approach is fully nonlinear and stems from the Landau-Ginzburg theory of phase transitions. Here we examine higher than 2nd-harmonic disturbances applied to Maclaurin spheroids, the corresponding bifurcating sequences, and their relation to nonlinear fission processes. The triangle and ammonite sequences bifurcate from the two 3rd-harmonic neutral points on the Maclaurin sequence while the square and one-ring sequences bifurcate from two of the three known 4th harmonic neutral points. In the other three cases, secular instability does not set in at the corresponding bifurcation points because the sequences stand and terminate at higher energies relative to the Maclaurin sequence. There is no known bifurcating sequence at the point of 3rd-harmonic dynamical instability. Our nonlinear approach easily identifies resonances between the Maclaurin sequence and various multi-fluid-body sequences that cannot be detected by linear stability analyses. Resonances appear as first-order phase transitions at points where the energies of the two sequences are nearly equal but the lower energy state belongs to one of the multi-fluid-body sequences.
  • In Papers I and II, we have used a free-energy minimization approach that stems from the Landau-Ginzburg theory of phase transitions to describe in simple and clear physical terms the secular and dynamical instabilities as well as the bifurcations along equilibrium sequences of rotating, self-gravitating fluid systems. Here we investigate the secular and dynamical 3rd-harmonic instabilities that appear first on the Jacobi sequence of incompressible zero- vorticity ellipsoids. Poincare found a bifurcation point on the Jacobi sequence where a 3rd-harmonic mode becomes neutral. A sequence of pear-shaped equilibria branches off at this point but stands at higher energies. Therefore, the Jacobi ellipsoids remain secularly and dynamically stable. Cartan found that dynamical 3rd-harmonic instability also sets in at the Jacobi-pear bifurcation. We find that Cartan's instability leads to differentially rotating objects and not to uniformly rotating pear-shaped equilibria. We demonstrate that the pear-shaped sequence exists at higher energies and at higher rotation relative to the Jacobi sequence. The Jacobi ellipsoid undergoes fission on a secular time scale and a short-period binary is produced. The classical fission hypothesis of binary-star formation of Poincare and Darwin is thus feasible.
  • We use a free-energy minimization approach to describe the secular and dynamical instabilities as well as the bifurcations along equilibrium sequences of rotating, self-gravitating fluid systems. Our approach is fully nonlinear and stems from the Ginzburg-Landau theory of phase transitions. In this paper, we examine fourth-harmonic axisymmetric disturbances in Maclaurin spheroids and fourth-harmonic nonaxisymmetric disturbances in Jacobi ellipsoids. These two cases are very similar in the framework of phase transitions. Irrespective of whether a nonlinear first-order phase transition occurs between the critical point and the higher turning point or an apparent second-order phase transition occurs beyond the higher turning point, the result is fission (i.e. ``spontaneous breaking'' of the topology) of the original object on a secular time scale: the Maclaurin spheroid becomes a uniformly rotating axisymmetric torus and the Jacobi ellipsoid becomes a binary. The presence of viscosity is crucial since angular momentum needs to be redistributed for uniform rotation to be maintained. The phase transitions of the dynamical systems are briefly discussed in relation to previous numerical simulations of the formation and evolution of protostellar systems.
  • We have previously introduced the parameter `alpha' as an indicator of stability to m=2 nonaxisymmetric modes in rotating, self-gravitating, axisymmetric, gaseous and stellar systems. This parameter can be written as a function of the total rotational kinetic energy, the total gravitational potential energy, and as a function of the topology/connectedness and the geometric shape of a system. Here we extend the stability criterion to nonaxisymmetric equilibrium systems, such as ellipsoids and elliptical disks and cylinders. We test the validity of this extension by considering predictions for previously published, gaseous and stellar, nonaxisymmetric models. The above formulation and critical values account accurately for the stability properties of m=2 modes in gaseous Riemann S-type ellipsoids (including the Jacobi and Dedekind ellipsoids) and elliptical Riemann disks as well as in stellar elliptical Freeman disks and cylinders: all these systems are dynamically stable except for the stellar elliptical Freeman disks that exhibit a relatively small region of m=2 dynamical instability.
  • New optical and NIR K-band images of the inner 3 kpc region of the nearby Virgo spiral M100 (NGC 4321) display remarkable morphological changes with wavelength. While in the optical the light is dominated by a circumnuclear zone of enhanced star formation, the features in the 2.2\mum image correspond to a newly discovered kpc-size stellar bar, and a pair of leading arms situated inside an ovally-shaped region. Only 5% of the K flux is emitted in antisymmetric structures. This indicates that the morphology seen in the NIR is dominated by a global density wave. Making a first-order correction for the presence of localized dust extinction in K using the I-K image, we find that the observed leading arm morphology is slightly hidden by dust. Possible mechanisms responsible for the optical and NIR morphology are discussed, and tests are proposed to discriminate between them. Conclusions are supported with an evolutionary stellar population model reproducing the optical and NIR colors in a number of star forming zones. We argue that this morphology is compatible with the presence of a pair of inner Lindblad resonances in the region, and show this explicitly in an accompanying paper by detailed numerical modeling. The observed phenomena may provide insight into physical processes leading to central activity in galaxies.
  • We analyze previous results on the stability of uniformly and differentially rotating, self-gravitating, gaseous and stellar, axisymmetric systems to derive a new stability criterion for the appearance of toroidal, m=2 Intermediate (I) and bar modes. In the process, we demonstrate that the bar modes in stellar systems and the m=2 I-modes in gaseous systems have many common physical characteristics and only one substantial difference: because of the anisotropy of the stress tensor, dynamical instability sets in at lower rotation in stellar systems. This difference is reflected also in the new stability criterion. The new stability parameter "alpha" is formulated first for uniformly rotating systems and is based on the angular momentum content rather than on the energy content of a system. For stability of stellar systems "alpha" = 0.254-0.258, while it is in the range of 0.341-0.354 for gaseous systems. For uniform rotation, one can write "alpha" as a function of the total (rotational) kinetic and gravitational energies, and of a parameter which is characteristic of the topology/connectedness and the geometric shape of a system. "Alpha" can be extended to and calculated for a variety of differentially rotating, gaseous and stellar, axisymmetric disk and spheroidal models whose equilibrium structures and stability characteristics are known. We also estimate "alpha" for gaseous toroidal models and for stellar disk systems embedded in an inert or responsive "halo". We find that the new stability criterion holds equally well for all these previously published axisymmetric models.