• In the last decade, astronomers have found a new type of supernova called `superluminous supernovae' (SLSNe) due to their high peak luminosity and long light-curves. These hydrogen-free explosions (SLSNe-I) can be seen to z~4 and therefore, offer the possibility of probing the distant Universe. We aim to investigate the possibility of detecting SLSNe-I using ESA's Euclid satellite, scheduled for launch in 2020. In particular, we study the Euclid Deep Survey (EDS) which will provide a unique combination of area, depth and cadence over the mission. We estimated the redshift distribution of Euclid SLSNe-I using the latest information on their rates and spectral energy distribution, as well as known Euclid instrument and survey parameters, including the cadence and depth of the EDS. We also applied a standardization method to the peak magnitudes to create a simulated Hubble diagram to explore possible cosmological constraints. We show that Euclid should detect approximately 140 high-quality SLSNe-I to z ~ 3.5 over the first five years of the mission (with an additional 70 if we lower our photometric classification criteria). This sample could revolutionize the study of SLSNe-I at z>1 and open up their use as probes of star-formation rates, galaxy populations, the interstellar and intergalactic medium. In addition, a sample of such SLSNe-I could improve constraints on a time-dependent dark energy equation-of-state, namely w(a), when combined with local SLSNe-I and the expected SN Ia sample from the Dark Energy Survey. We show that Euclid will observe hundreds of SLSNe-I for free. These luminous transients will be in the Euclid data-stream and we should prepare now to identify them as they offer a new probe of the high-redshift Universe for both astrophysics and cosmology.
  • The Euclid space mission proposes to survey 15000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky during 6 years, with a step-and-stare technique. The scheduling of observation sequences is driven by the primary scientific objectives, spacecraft constraints, calibration requirements and physical properties of the sky. We present the current reference implementation of the Euclid survey and on-going work on survey optimization.
  • Euclid is the next ESA mission devoted to cosmology. It aims at observing most of the extragalactic sky, studying both gravitational lensing and clustering over $\sim$15,000 square degrees. The mission is expected to be launched in year 2020 and to last six years. The sheer amount of data of different kinds, the variety of (un)known systematic effects and the complexity of measures require efforts both in sophisticated simulations and techniques of data analysis. We review the mission main characteristics, some aspects of the the survey and highlight some of the areas of interest to this meeting
  • Euclid is a future space-based mission that will constrain dark energy with unprecedented accuracy. Its photometric component is optimized for Weak Lensing studies, while the spectroscopic component is designed for Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) analysis. We use the Fisher matrix formalism to make forecasts on two quintessence dark energy models with a dynamical equation of state that leads to late-time oscillations in the expansion rate of the Universe. We find that Weak Lensing will place much stronger constraints than the BAO, being able to discriminate between oscillating models by measuring the relevant parameters to $1\sigma$ precisions of 5 to $20\%$. The tight constraints suggest that Euclid data could identify even quite small late-time oscillations in the expansion rate of the Universe.
  • Euclid is an ESA Cosmic-Vision wide-field-space mission which is designed to explain the origin of the acceleration of Universe expansion. The mission will investigate at the same time two primary cosmological probes: Weak gravitational Lensing (WL) and Galaxy Clustering (in particular Baryon Acoustic Oscillations, BAO). The extreme precision requested on primary science objectives can only be achieved by observing a large number of galaxies distributed over the whole sky in order to probe the distribution of dark matter and galaxies at all scales. The extreme accuracy needed requires observation from space to limit all observational biases in the measurements. The definition of the Euclid survey, aiming at detecting billions of galaxies over 15 000 square degrees of the extragalactic sky, is a key parameter of the mission. It drives its scientific potential, its duration and the mass of the spacecraft. The construction of a Reference Survey derives from the high level science requirements for a Wide and a Deep survey. The definition of a main sequence of observations and the associated calibrations were indeed a major achievement of the Definition Phase. Implementation of this sequence demonstrated the feasibility of covering the requested area in less than 6 years while taking into account the overheads of space segment observing and maneuvering sequence. This reference mission will be used for sizing the spacecraft consumables needed for primary science. It will also set the framework for optimizing the time on the sky to fulfill the primary science and maximize the Euclid legacy.
  • Weak gravitational lensing is one of the most promising tools to investigate the equation-of-state of dark energy. In order to obtain reliable parameter estimations for current and future experiments, a good theoretical understanding of dark matter clustering is essential. Of particular interest is the statistical precision to which weak lensing observables, such as cosmic shear correlation functions, can be determined. We construct a fitting formula for the non-Gaussian part of the covariance of the lensing power spectrum. The Gaussian contribution to the covariance, which is proportional to the lensing power spectrum squared, and optionally shape noise can be included easily by adding their contributions. Starting from a canonical estimator for the dimensionless lensing power spectrum, we model first the covariance in the halo model approach including all four halo terms for one fiducial cosmology and then fit two polynomials to the expression found. On large scales, we use a first-order polynomial in the wave-numbers and dimensionless power spectra that goes asymptotically towards $1.1 C_{pt}$ for $\ell \to 0$, i.e., the result for the non-Gaussian part of the covariance using tree-level perturbation theory. On the other hand, for small scales we employ a second-order polynomial in the dimensionless power spectra for the fit. We obtain a fitting formula for the non-Gaussian contribution of the convergence power spectrum covariance that is accurate to 10% for the off-diagonal elements, and to 5% for the diagonal elements, in the range $50 \lesssim \ell \lesssim 5000$ and can be used for single source redshifts $z_{s} \in [0.5,2.0]$ in WMAP5-like cosmologies.
  • We combine measurements of weak gravitational lensing from the CFHTLS-Wide survey, supernovae Ia from CFHT SNLS and CMB anisotropies from WMAP5 to obtain joint constraints on cosmological parameters, in particular, the dark energy equation of state parameter w. We assess the influence of systematics in the data on the results and look for possible correlations with cosmological parameters. We implement an MCMC algorithm to sample the parameter space of a flat CDM model with a dark-energy component of constant w. Systematics in the data are parametrised and included in the analysis. We determine the influence of photometric calibration of SNIa data on cosmological results by calculating the response of the distance modulus to photometric zero-point variations. The weak lensing data set is tested for anomalous field-to-field variations and a systematic shape measurement bias for high-z galaxies. Ignoring photometric uncertainties for SNLS biases cosmological parameters by at most 20% of the statistical errors, using supernovae only; the parameter uncertainties are underestimated by 10%. The weak lensing field-to-field variance pointings is 5%-15% higher than that predicted from N-body simulations. We find no bias of the lensing signal at high redshift, within the framework of a simple model. Assuming a systematic underestimation of the lensing signal at high redshift, the normalisation sigma_8 increases by up to 8%. Combining all three probes we obtain -0.10<1+w<0.06 at 68% confidence (-0.18<1+w<0.12 at 95%), including systematic errors. Systematics in the data increase the error bars by up to 35%; the best-fit values change by less than 0.15sigma. [Abridged]
  • General relativity as one the pillar of modern cosmology has to be thoroughly tested if we want to achieve an accurate cosmology. We present the results from such a test on cosmological scales using cosmic shear and galaxy clustering measurements. We parametrize potential deviation from general relativity as a modification to the cosmological Poisson equation. We consider two models relevant either for some linearized theory of massive gravity or for the physics of extra-dimensions. We use the latest observations from the CFHTLS-Wide survey and the SDSS survey to set our constraints. We do not find any deviation from general relativity on scales between 0.04 and 10 Mpc. We derive constraints on the graviton mass in a restricted class of model.
  • We present an exploration of weak lensing by large-scale structure in the linear regime, using the third-year (T0003) CFHTLS Wide data release. Our results place tight constraints on the scaling of the amplitude of the matter power spectrum sigma_8 with the matter density Omega_m. Spanning 57 square degrees to i'_AB = 24.5 over three independent fields, the unprecedented contiguous area of this survey permits high signal-to-noise measurements of two-point shear statistics from 1 arcmin to 4 degrees. Understanding systematic errors in our analysis is vital in interpreting the results. We therefore demonstrate the percent-level accuracy of our method using STEP simulations, an E/B-mode decomposition of the data, and the star-galaxy cross correlation function. We also present a thorough analysis of the galaxy redshift distribution using redshift data from the CFHTLS T0003 Deep fields that probe the same spatial regions as the Wide fields. We find sigma_8(Omega_m/0.25)^0.64 = 0.785+-0.043 using the aperture-mass statistic for the full range of angular scales for an assumed flat cosmology, in excellent agreement with WMAP3 constraints. The largest physical scale probed by our analysis is 85 Mpc, assuming a mean redshift of lenses of 0.5 and a LCDM cosmology. This allows for the first time to constrain cosmology using only cosmic shear measurements in the linear regime. Using only angular scales theta> 85 arcmin, we find sigma_8(Omega_m/0.25)_lin^0.53 = 0.837+-0.084, which agree with the results from our full analysis. Combining our results with data from WMAP3, we find Omega_m=0.248+-0.019 and sigma_8 = 0.771+-0.029.
  • We present the first cosmic shear measurements obtained from the T0001 release of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey. The data set covers three uncorrelated patches (D1, D3 and D4) of one square degree each observed in u*, g', r', i' and z' bands, out to i'=25.5. The depth and the multicolored observations done in deep fields enable several data quality controls. The lensing signal is detected in both r' and i' bands and shows similar amplitude and slope in both filters. B-modes are found to be statistically zero at all scales. Using multi-color information, we derived a photometric redshift for each galaxy and separate the sample into medium and high-z galaxies. A stronger shear signal is detected from the high-z subsample than from the low-z subsample, as expected from weak lensing tomography. While further work is needed to model the effects of errors in the photometric redshifts, this results suggests that it will be possible to obtain constraints on the growth of dark matter fluctuations with lensing wide field surveys. The various quality tests and analysis discussed in this work demonstrate that MegaPrime/Megacam instrument produces excellent quality data. The combined Deep and Wide surveys give sigma_8= 0.89 pm 0.06 assuming the Peacock & Dodds non-linear scheme and sigma_8=0.86 pm 0.05 for the halo fitting model and Omega_m=0.3. We assumed a Cold Dark Matter model with flat geometry. Systematics, Hubble constant and redshift uncertainties have been marginalized over. Using only data from the Deep survey, the 1 sigma upper bound for w_0, the constant equation of state parameter is w_0 < -0.8.
  • We present a prospective analysis of a combined cosmic shear and cosmic microwave background data set, focusing on a Canada France Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) type lensing survey and the current WMAP-1 year and CBI data. We investigate the parameter degeneracies and error estimates of a seven parameters model, for the lensing alone as well as for the combined experiments. The analysis is performed using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain calculation, allowing for a more realistic estimate of errors and degeneracies than a Fisher matrix approach. After a detailed discussion of the relevant statistical techniques, the set of the most relevant 2 and 3-dimensional lensing contours are given. It is shown that the combined cosmic shear and CMB is particularly efficient to break some parameter degeneracies. The principal components directions are computed and it is found that the most orthogonal contours between the two experiments are for the parameter pairs (Omega_m,sigma_8), (h,ns) and (ns,nrun), where ns and nrun are the slope of the primordial mass power spectrum and the running spectral index respectively. It is shown that an improvement of a factor 2 is expected on the running spectral index from the combined data sets. Forecasts for error improvements from a wide field space telescope lensing survey are also given.
  • We present an overview of the cosmic shear results obtained so far. We focus on the 2-point statistics only. Evidences supporting the cosmological origin of the measured signal are reviewed, and issues related to various systematics are discussed.
  • We discuss the present status and future prospects for cosmic shear observations and their cosmological constraints. We review the evidences supporting the cosmological origin of the measured signal, and discuss the possible problems coming from intrinsic alignment and from the actual limitations of theoretical predictions.
  • To resolve some unphysical interpretations related to velocity measurements by static observers, we discuss the use of generalized observer sets, give a prescription for defining the speed of test particles relative to those observers and show that, for any locally inertial frame, the speed of a freely falling material particle is always less than the speed of light at the Schwarzschild black hole surface.