• Tunnelling, one of the key features of quantum mechanics, ignited an ongoing debate about the value, meaning and interpretation of 'tunnelling time'. Until recently the debate was purely theoretical, with the process considered to be instantaneous for all practical purposes. This changed with the development of ultrafast lasers and in particular, the 'attoclock' technique that is used to probe the attosecond dynamics of electrons. Although the initial attoclock measurements hinted at instantaneous tunnelling, later experiments contradicted those findings, claiming to have measured finite tunnelling times. In each case these measurements were performed with multi-electron atoms. Atomic hydrogen (H), the simplest atomic system with a single electron, can be 'exactly' (subject only to numerical limitations) modelled using numerical solutions of the 3D-TDSE with measured experimental parameters and acts as a convenient benchmark for both accurate experimental measurements and calculations. Here we report the first attoclock experiment performed on H and find that our experimentally determined offset angles are in excellent agreement with accurate 3D-TDSE simulations performed using our experimental pulse parameters. The same simulations with a short-range Yukawa potential result in zero offset angles for all intensities. We conclude that the offset angle measured in the attoclock experiments originates entirely from electron scattering by the long-range Coulomb potential with no contribution from tunnelling time delay. That conclusion is supported by empirical observation that the electron offset angles follow closely the simple formula for the deflection angle of electrons undergoing classical Rutherford scattering by the Coulomb potential. Thus we confirm that, in H, tunnelling is instantaneous (with an upperbound of 1.8 as) within our experimental and numerical uncertainty.
  • Time-resolved optical emission spectroscopic measurements of a plasma generated by irradiating a Cr target using 60 picosecond (ps) and 300 ps laser pulses is carried out to investigate the variation in the linewidth ($\delta\lambda$) of emission from neutrals and ions for increasing ambient pressures. Measurements ranging from 10$^{-6}$ Torr to 10$^2$ Torr show a distinctly different variation in the $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals (Cr I) compared to that of singly ionized Cr (Cr II), for both irradiations. $\delta\lambda$ increases monotonously with pressure for Cr II, but an oscillation is evident at intermediate pressures for Cr I. This oscillation does not depend on the laser pulse widths used. In spite of the differences in the plasma formation mechanisms, it is experimentally found that there is an optimum intermediate background pressure for which $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals drops to a minimum. Importantly, these results underline the fact that for intermediate pressures, the usual practice of calculating the plasma number density from the $\delta\lambda$ of neutrals needs to be judiciously done, to avoid reaching inaccurate conclusions.
  • This work describes the first observations of the ionisation of neon in a metastable atomic state utilising a strong-field, few-cycle light pulse. We compare the observations to theoretical predictions based on the Ammosov-Delone-Krainov (ADK) theory and a solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation (TDSE). The TDSE provides better agreement with the experimental data than the ADK theory. We optically pump the target atomic species and demonstrate that the ionisation rate depends on the spin state of the target atoms and provide physically transparent interpretation of such a spin dependence in the frameworks of the spin-polarised Hartree-Fock and random-phase approximations.
  • We present accurate measurements of carrier-envelope phase effects on ionisation of the noble gases with few-cycle laser pulses. The experimental apparatus is calibrated by using atomic hydrogen data to remove any systematic offsets and thereby obtain accurate CEP data on other generally used noble gases such as Ar, Kr and Xe. Experimental results for H are well supported by exact TDSE theoretical simulations however significant differences are observed in case of noble gases.
  • It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates (O.I. Tolstikhin, H.J. Worner and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013) [1]). We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.
  • As the simplest atomic system, the hydrogen atom plays a key benchmarking role in laser and quantum physics. Atomic hydrogen is a widely used atomic test system for theoretical calculations of strong-field ionization, since approximate theories can be directly compared to numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schr\"odinger equation. However, relatively little experimental data is available for comparison to these calculations, since atomic hydrogen sources are difficult to construct and use. We review the existing experimental results on strong-field ionization of atomic hydrogen in multi-cycle and few-cycle laser pulses. Quantitative agreement has been achieved between experiment and theoretical predictions at the 10% uncertainty level, and has been used to develop an intensity calibration method with 1% uncertainty. Such quantitative agreement can be used to certify experimental techniques as being free from systematic errors, guaranteeing the accuracy of data obtained on species other than H. We review the experimental and theoretical techniques that enable these results.
  • We present the first experimental data on strong-field ionization of atomic hydrogen by few-cycle laser pulses. We obtain quantitative agreement at the 10% level between the data and an {\it ab initio} simulation over a wide range of laser intensities and electron energies.
  • We report the first experimental observation of non-adiabatic field-free orientation of a heteronuclear diatomic molecule (CO) induced by an intense two-color (800 and 400 nm) femtosecond laser field. We monitor orientation by measuring fragment ion angular distributions after Coulomb explosion with an 800 nm pulse. The orientation of the molecules is controlled by the relative phase of the two-color field. The results are compared to quantum mechanical rigid rotor calculations. The demonstrated method can be applied to study molecular frame dynamics under field-free conditions in conjunction with a variety of spectroscopy methods, such as high-harmonic generation, electron diffraction and molecular frame photoemission.