• We have used the Submillimeter Array at 860$\,\mu$m to observe the brightest SCUBA-2 sources in 4$\,$deg$^{2}$ of the Cosmology Legacy Survey. We have targeted 75 of the brightest single-dish SCUBA-2 850$\,\mu$m sources down to $S_{850}\,{\approx}\,8\,$mJy, achieving an average synthesized beam of 2.4$^{\prime\prime}$ and an average rms of $\sigma_{860}\,{=}\,1.5\,$mJy in our primary beam-corrected maps. We searched our maps for $4\sigma$ peaks, corresponding to $S_{860}\,{\gtrsim}\,6\,$mJy sources, and detected 59 single galaxies and three pairs of galaxies. We include in our study 28 archival observations, bringing our sample size to 103 bright single-dish submillimetre sources with interferometric follow-up. We compute the cumulative and differential number counts of our sample, finding them to overlap with previous single-dish survey number counts within the uncertainties, although our cumulative number count is systematically lower than the parent SCUBA-2 cumulative number count by $24\,{\pm}\,6$ per cent between 11 and 15$\,$mJy. We estimate the probability that a ${\gtrsim}\,10\,$mJy single-dish submillimetre source resolves into two or more galaxies with similar flux densities, causing a significant change in the number counts, to be about 15 per cent. Assuming the remaining 85 per cent of the targets are ultra-luminous starburst galaxies between $z\,{=}\,2$-3, we find a likely volume density of ${\gtrsim}\,400\,$M$_{\odot}\,$yr$^{-1}$ sources to be ${\sim}\,3^{+0.7}_{-0.6}\,{\times}\,10^{-7}\,$Mpc$^{-3}$. We show that the descendants of these galaxies could be ${\gtrsim}\,4\,{\times}\,10^{11}\,$M$_{\odot}$ local quiescent galaxies, and that about 10 per cent of their total stellar mass would have formed during these short bursts of star-formation.
  • To search for dust-obscured star-formation activity in the early Universe, it is essential to obtain a deep and wide submillimeter/millimeter map. The advent of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has enabled us to obtain such maps at sufficiently high spatial resolution to be free from source confusion. We present a new 1.1mm map obtained by ALMA in the SSA22 field. SSA22 contains a remarkable proto-cluster at z=3.09 and is therefore an ideal region to investigate the role of large-scale cosmic web on dust-obscured star formation. The typical 1sigma depth of our map is 73 uJy/beam at a 0.5 resolution; combined with earlier, archived observations, we map an area of 20 arcmin^2 (71 comoving Mpc^2 at z=3.09). Within the combined survey area we have detected 35 sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) >5, with flux densities, S1.1mm=0.43--5.6 mJy, equivalent to star-formation rates of >=100--1000 Msun/yr at z=3.09, for a Chabrier initial mass function; of these, 17 are new detections. The cumulative number counts show a factor 3--5x excess compared to blank fields. The excess suggests enhanced dust-enshrouded star-formation activity in the proto-cluster on a 10 comoving Mpc scale, indicating accelerated galaxy evolution in this overdense region.
  • We use ALMA observations of four sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) at $z\sim2-3$ to investigate the spatially resolved properties of the inter-stellar medium (ISM) at scales of 1--5 kpc (0.1--0.6$''$). The velocity fields of our sources, traced by the $^{12}$CO($J$=3-2) emission, are consistent with disk rotation to first order, implying average dynamical masses of $\sim$3$\times10^{11}$M$_{\odot}$ within two half-light radii. Through a Bayesian approach we investigate the uncertainties inherent to dynamically constraining total gas masses. We explore the covariance between the stellar mass-to-light ratio and CO-to-H$_{2}$ conversion factor, $\alpha_{\rm CO}$, finding values of $\alpha_{\rm CO}=1.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7}$ for dark matter fractions of 15 \%. We show that the resolved spatial distribution of the gas and dust continuum can be uncorrelated to the stellar emission, challenging energy balance assumptions in global SED fitting. Through a stacking analysis of the resolved radial profiles of the CO(3-2), stellar and dust continuum emission in SMG samples, we find that the cool molecular gas emission in these sources (radii $\sim$5--14 kpc) is clearly more extended than the rest-frame $\sim$250 $\mu$m dust continuum by a factor $>2$. We propose that assuming a constant dust-to-gas ratio, this apparent difference in sizes can be explained by temperature and optical-depth gradients alone. Our results suggest that caution must be exercised when extrapolating morphological properties of dust continuum observations to conclusions about the molecular gas phase of the ISM.
  • Deep narrow-band surveys have revealed a large population of faint Lyman-alpha (Lya) emitters (LAEs) in the distant Universe, but relatively little is known about the most luminous sources ($L_{Ly\alpha}>10^{42.7}$ erg/s; $L_{Ly\alpha}>L^*_{Ly\alpha}$). Here we present the spectroscopic follow-up of 21 luminous LAEs at z~2-3 found with panoramic narrow-band surveys over five independent extragalactic fields (~4x10$^6$ Mpc$^{3}$ surveyed at z~2.2 and z~3.1). We use WHT/ISIS, Keck/DEIMOS and VLT/X-SHOOTER to study these sources using high ionisation UV lines. Luminous LAEs at z~2-3 have blue UV slopes ($\beta=-2.0^{+0.3}_{-0.1}$), high Lya escape fractions ($50^{+20}_{-15}$%) and span five orders of magnitude in UV luminosity ($M_{UV}\approx-19$ to -24). Many (70%) show at least one high ionisation rest-frame UV line such as CIV, NV, CIII], HeII or OIII], typically blue-shifted by ~100-200 km/s relative to Lya. Their Lya profiles reveal a wide variety of shapes, including significant blue-shifted components and widths from 200 to 4000 km/s. Overall, 60+-11% appear to be AGN dominated, and at $L_{Ly\alpha}>10^{43.3}$ erg/s and/or $M_{UV}<-21.5$ virtually all LAEs are AGN with high ionisation parameters (log U=0.6+-0.5) and with metallicities of ~0.5-1 Zsun. Those lacking signatures of AGN (40+-11%) have lower ionisation parameters ($\log U=-3.0^{+1.6}_{-0.9}$ and $\log\xi_{\rm ion}=25.4\pm0.2$) and are apparently metal-poor sources likely powered by young, dust-poor "maximal" starbursts. Our results show that luminous LAEs at z~2-3 are a diverse population and that 2xL$^*_{Ly\alpha}$ and 2xM$_{UV}^*$ mark a sharp transition in the nature of LAEs, from star formation dominated to AGN dominated.
  • We analyse the velocity dispersion properties of 472 z~0.9 star-forming galaxies observed as part of the KMOS Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). The majority of this sample is rotationally dominated (83 +/- 5% with v_C/sigma_0 > 1) but also dynamically hot and highly turbulent. After correcting for beam smearing effects, the median intrinsic velocity dispersion for the final sample is sigma_0 = 43.2 +/- 0.8 km/s with a rotational velocity to dispersion ratio of v_C/sigma_0 = 2.6 +/- 0.1. To explore the relationship between velocity dispersion, stellar mass, star formation rate and redshift we combine KROSS with data from the SAMI survey (z~0.05) and an intermediate redshift MUSE sample (z~0.5). While there is, at most, a weak trend between velocity dispersion and stellar mass, at fixed mass there is a strong increase with redshift. At all redshifts, galaxies appear to follow the same weak trend of increasing velocity dispersion with star formation rate. Our results are consistent with an evolution of galaxy dynamics driven by disks that are more gas rich, and increasingly gravitationally unstable, as a function of increasing redshift. Finally, we test two analytic models that predict turbulence is driven by either gravitational instabilities or stellar feedback. Both provide an adequate description of the data, and further observations are required to rule out either model.
  • The SCUBA-2 Ultra Deep Imaging EAO Survey (STUDIES) is a three-year JCMT Large Program aiming at reaching the 450 $\mu$m confusion limit in the COSMOS-CANDELS region, to study a representative sample of the high-redshift far-infrared galaxy population that gives rise to the bulk of the far-infrared background. We present the first-year data from STUDIES. We have reached a 450 $\mu$m noise level of 0.91~mJy for point sources at the map center, covered an area of 151 arcmin$^2$, and detected 98 and 141 sources at 4.0 and 3.5 $\sigma$, respectively. Our derived counts are best constrained in the 3.5-25 mJy regime using directly detected sources. Below the detection limits, our fluctuation analysis further constrains the slope of the counts down to 1 mJy. The resulting counts at 1-25 mJy are consistent with a power law having a slope of $-2.59$ ($\pm0.10$ for 3.5-25 mJy, and $^{+0.4}_{-0.7}$ for 1-3.5 mJy). There is no evidence of a faint-end termination or turn-over of the counts in this flux density range. Our counts are also consistent with previous SCUBA-2 blank-field and lensing cluster surveys. The integrated surface brightness from our counts down to 1 mJy is $90.0\pm17.2$ Jy deg$^{-2}$, which can account for up to $83^{+15}_{-16}\%$ of the COBE 450 $\mu$m background. We show that Herschel counts at 350 and 500 $\mu$m are significantly higher than our 450 $\mu$m counts, likely caused by its large beam and source clustering. High-angular resolution instruments like SCUBA-2 at 450 $\mu$m are therefore highly beneficial for measuring the luminosity and spatial density of high-redshift dusty galaxies.
  • We present new results from near-infrared spectroscopy with Keck/MOSFIRE of [OIII]-selected galaxies at $z\sim3.2$. With our $H$ and $K$-band spectra, we investigate the interstellar medium (ISM) conditions, such as ionization states and gas metallicities. [OIII] emitters at $z\sim3.2$ show a typical gas metallicity of $\mathrm{12+log(O/H) = 8.07\pm0.07}$ at $\mathrm{log(M_*/M_\odot) \sim 9.0-9.2}$ and $\mathrm{12+log(O/H) = 8.31\pm0.04}$ at $\mathrm{log(M_*/M_\odot) \sim 9.7-10.2}$ when using the empirical calibration method. We compare the [OIII] emitters at $z\sim3.2$ with UV-selected galaxies and Ly$\alpha$ emitters at the same epoch and find that the [OIII]-based selection does not appear to show any systematic bias in the selection of star-forming galaxies. Moreover, comparing with star-forming galaxies at $z\sim2$ from literature, our samples show similar ionization parameters and gas metallicities as those obtained by the previous studies using the same calibration method. We find no strong redshift evolution in the ISM conditions between $z\sim3.2$ and $z\sim2$. Considering that the star formation rates at a fixed stellar mass also do not significantly change between the two epochs, our results support the idea that the stellar mass is the primary quantity to describe the evolutionary stages of individual galaxies at $z>2$.
  • We present detailed studies of a $z=2.12$ submillimeter galaxy, ALESS67.1, using sub-arcsecond resolution ALMA, AO-aided VLT/SINFONI, and HST/CANDELS data to investigate the kinematics and spatial distributions of dust emission (870 $\mu$m continuum), $^{12}$CO($J$=3-2), strong optical emission lines, and visible stars. Dynamical modelling of the optical emission lines suggests that ALESS67.1 is not a pure rotating disk but a merger, consistent with the apparent tidal features revealed in the HST imaging. Our sub-arcsecond resolution dataset allow us to measure half-light radii for all the tracers, and we find a factor of 4-6 smaller sizes in dust continuum compared to all the other tracers, including $^{12}$CO, and UV and H$\alpha$ emission is significantly offset from the dust continuum. The spatial mismatch between UV continuum and the cold dust and gas reservoir supports the explanation that geometrical effects are responsible for the offset of dusty galaxy on the IRX-$\beta$ diagram. Using a dynamical method we derive an $\alpha_{\rm CO}=1.8\pm1.0$, consistent with other SMGs that also have resolved CO and dust measurements. Assuming a single $\alpha_{\rm CO}$ value we also derive resolved gas and star-formation rate surface densities, and find that the core region of the galaxy ($\lesssim5$ kpc) follows the trend of mergers on the Schmidt-Kennicutt relationship, whereas the outskirts ($\gtrsim5$ kpc) lie on the locus of normal star-forming galaxies, suggesting different star-formation efficiencies within one galaxy. Our results caution against using single size or morphology for different tracers of the star-formation activity and gas content of galaxies, and therefore argue the need to use spatially-resolved, multi-wavelength observations to interpret the properties of SMGs, and perhaps even for $z>1$ galaxies in general.
  • We present a sample of $\sim 1000$ emission line galaxies at $z=0.4-4.7$ from the $\sim0.7$deg$^2$ High-$z$ Emission Line Survey (HiZELS) in the Bo\"otes field identified with a suite of six narrow-band filters at $\approx 0.4-2.1$ $\mu$m. These galaxies have been selected on their Ly$\alpha$ (73), {\sc [Oii]} (285), H$\beta$/{\sc [Oiii]} (387) or H$\alpha$ (362) emission-line, and have been classified with optical to near-infrared colours. A subsample of 98 sources have reliable redshifts from multiple narrow-band (e.g. [O{\sc ii}]-H$\alpha$) detections and/or spectroscopy. In this survey paper, we present the observations, selection and catalogs of emitters. We measure number densities of Ly$\alpha$, [O{\sc ii}], H$\beta$/{\sc [Oiii]} and H$\alpha$ and confirm strong luminosity evolution in star-forming galaxies from $z\sim0.4$ to $\sim 5$, in agreement with previous results. To demonstrate the usefulness of dual-line emitters, we use the sample of dual [O{\sc ii}]-H$\alpha$ emitters to measure the observed [O{\sc ii}]/H$\alpha$ ratio at $z=1.47$. The observed [O{\sc ii}]/H$\alpha$ ratio increases significantly from 0.40$\pm0.01$ at $z=0.1$ to 0.52$\pm0.05$ at $z=1.47$, which we attribute to either decreasing dust attenuation with redshift, or due to a bias in the (typically) fiber-measurements in the local Universe which only measure the central kpc regions. At the bright end, we find that both the H$\alpha$ and Ly$\alpha$ number densities at $z\approx2.2$ deviate significantly from a Schechter form, following a power-law. We show that this is driven entirely by an increasing X-ray/AGN fraction with line-luminosity, which reaches $\approx 100$ \% at line-luminosities $L\gtrsim3\times10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$.
  • We present new observations of the GOODS-N field obtained at 5.5 GHz with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). The central region of the field was imaged to a median r.m.s. of 3 microJy/beam with a resolution of 0.5 arcsec. From a 14-arcmin diameter region we extracted a sample of 94 radio sources with signal-to-noise ratio greater than 5. Near-IR identifications are available for about 88 percent of the radio sources. We used different multi-band diagnostics to separate active galactic nuclei (AGN), both radiatively efficient and inefficient, from star-forming galaxies. From our analysis, we find that about 80 percent of our radio-selected sample is AGN-dominated, with the fraction raising to 92 percent when considering only the radio sources with redshift >1.5. This large fraction of AGN-dominated radio sources at very low flux densities (the median flux density at 5.5 GHz is 42 microJy), where star-forming galaxies are expected to dominate, is somewhat surprising and at odds with other results. Our interpretation is that both the frequency and angular resolution of our radio observations strongly select against radio sources whose brightness distribution is diffuse on scale of several kpc. Indeed, we find that the median angular sizes of the AGN-dominated sources is around 0.2-0.3 arcsec against 0.8 arcsec for star-forming galaxies. This highlights the key role that high frequency radio observations can play in pinpointing AGN-driven radio emission at microJy levels. This work is part of the eMERGE legacy project.
  • We present spectroscopic redshifts of S(870)>2mJy submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) which have been identified from the ALMA follow-up observations of 870um detected sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (the ALMA-LESS survey). We derive spectroscopic redshifts for 52 SMGs, with a median of z=2.4+/-0.1. However, the distribution features a high redshift tail, with ~25% of the SMGs at z>3. Spectral diagnostics suggest that the SMGs are young starbursts, and the velocity offsets between the nebular emission and UV ISM absorption lines suggest that many are driving winds, with velocity offsets up to 2000km/s. Using the spectroscopic redshifts and the extensive UV-to-radio photometry in this field, we produce optimised spectral energy distributions (SEDs) using Magphys, and use the SEDs to infer a median stellar mass of M*=(6+/-1)x10^{10}Msol for our SMGs with spectroscopic redshifts. By combining these stellar masses with the star-formation rates (measured from the far-infrared SEDs), we show that SMGs (on average) lie a factor ~5 above the main-sequence at z~2. We provide this library of 52 template fits with robust and well-sampled SEDs available as a resource for future studies of SMGs, and also release the spectroscopic catalog of ~2000 (mostly infrared-selected) galaxies targeted as part of the spectroscopic campaign.
  • We investigate the clustering properties of $\sim 7000$ H$\beta$+[OIII] and [OII] narrowband-selected emitters at $z \sim 0.8 - 4.7$ from the High-$z$ Emission Line Survey. We find clustering lengths, $r_0$, of $1.5 - 4.0h^{-1}$ Mpc and minimum dark matter halo masses of $10^{10.7 - 12.1}\rm{M}_\odot$ for our $z = 0.8 - 3.2$ H$\beta$+[OIII] emitters and $r_0 \sim 2.0 - 8.3h^{-1}$ Mpc and halo masses of $10^{11.5 - 12.6}\rm{M}_\odot$ for our $z = 1.5 - 4.7$ [OII] emitters. We find $r_0$ to strongly increase both with increasing line luminosity and redshift. By taking into account the evolution of the characteristic line luminosity, $L^\star(z)$, and using our model predictions of halo mass given $r_0$, we find a strong, redshift-independent increasing trend between $L/L^\star(z)$ and minimum halo mass. The faintest H$\beta$+[OIII] emitters are found to reside in $10^{9.5}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos and the brightest emitters in $10^{13.0}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos. For [OII] emitters, the faintest emitters are found in $10^{10.5} \rm{M}_\odot$ halos and the brightest emitters in $10^{12.6}\rm{M}_\odot$ halos. A redshift-independent stellar mass dependency is also observed where the halo mass increases from $10^{11}\rm{M}_\odot$ to $10^{12.5} \rm{M}_\odot$ for stellar masses of $10^{8.5}\rm{M}_\odot$ to $10^{11.5}\rm{M}_\odot$, respectively. We investigate the interdependencies of these trends by repeating our analysis in a $L_\textrm{line} - \rm{M}_\textrm{star}$ grid space for our most populated samples (H$\beta$+[OIII] $z = 0.84$ and [OII] $z = 1.47$) and find that the line luminosity dependency is stronger than the stellar mass dependency on halo mass. For $L > L^\star$ emitters at all epochs, we find a relatively flat trend with halo masses of $10^{12.5 - 13}\rm{M}_\odot$ which may be due to quenching mechanisms in massive halos which is consistent with a transitional halo mass predicted by models.
  • In this second paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we cross-match SCUBA-2 maps with 3 and 6 GHz images from the Janksy-VLA Frontier Fields Legacy Survey for three cluster fields, MACS J0416.1--2403, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1149.5+2223. Within the HST coverage, 14 out of 44 850 $\mu$m sources have 3 GHz counterparts, five of which are also detected at 6 GHz. The 850 $\mu$m flux densities of these detected sources span from 0.7 to 4.4 mJy after correcting for lensing amplification. The median redshift of the sample is $z = 1.28^{+0.07}_{-0.09}$, much lower than the typical redshifts ($z = 2-3$) of brighter submillimeter galaxies in the literature. In addition, we find that our sources have lower dust temperatures than those of the brighter submillimeter galaxies. This is also confirmed by an analysis of the ratio between infrared star formation rate and 850 $\mu$m flux density. However, these 14 sources may not represent the general submillimeter population at the same flux range, given that the SCUBA-2 sources without radio counterparts are likely at higher redshifts. Detection of these sources would require deeper radio images or submillimeter interferometry.
  • The identification of high-redshift massive galaxies with old stellar populations may pose challenges to some models of galaxy formation. However, to securely classify a galaxy as quiescent, it is necessary to exclude significant ongoing star formation, something that can be challenging to achieve at high redshift. In this letter, we analyse deep ALMA/870um and SCUBA-2/450um imaging of the claimed "post-starburst" galaxy ZF-20115 at z=3.717 that exhibits a strong Balmer break and absorption lines. The far-infrared imaging reveals a luminous starburst located 0.4+/-0.1 arcsec (~3kpc in projection) from the position of the rest-frame ultra-violet/optical emission, with an obscured star-formation rate of 100 Mo/yr. This star-forming component is undetected in the rest-frame ultraviolet but contributes significantly to the lower angular resolution photometry at restframe wavelengths >3500A, significantly complicating the determination of a reliable stellar mass. Importantly, in the presence of dust obscuration, strong Balmer features are not a unique signature of a post-starburst galaxy and are indeed frequently observed in infrared-luminous galaxies. We conclude that the ZF20015 system does not pose a challenge to current models of galaxy formation and that deep sub-/millimeter observations are a prerequisite for any claims of quiescence. The multi-wavelength observations of ZF20115 unveil a complex system with an intricate and spatially-varying star-formation history. ZF20115 demonstrates that understanding high-redshift obscured starbursts will only be possible with multi-wavelength studies that include high-resolution observations, available with the JWST, at mid-infrared wavelengths.
  • We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 sub-millimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870$\mu$m continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA2-selected sub-mm sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially near-infrared), panoramic imaging of the UDS field at optical-to-radio wavelengths we characterize key properties of the SMG population. The median photometric redshift of the bright ALMA/SCUBA-2 UDS (AS2UDS) SMGs that are detected in a sufficient number of wavebands to derive a robust photometric redshift is $z$=2.65$\pm$0.13. However, similar to previous studies, 27% of the SMGs are too faint at optical-to-near-infrared wavelengths to derive a reliable photometric redshift. Assuming that these SMGs lie at z$\gtrsim$3 raises the median redshift of the full sample to $z$=2.9$\pm$0.2. A subset of 23, unlensed, bright AS2UDS SMGs have sizes measured from resolved imaging of their rest-frame far-infrared emission. We show that the extent and luminosity of the far-infrared emission are consistent with the dust emission arising from regions that are optically thick, on average, at a wavelength of $\lambda_0$$\ge$75$\mu$m (1-$\sigma$ dispersion of 55-90$\mu$m). Using the dust masses derived from our optically-thick spectral energy distribution models we determine that these galaxies have a median hydrogen column density of $N_{H}$=9.8$_{-0.7}^{+1.4}$$\times$10$^{23}$cm$^{-2}$, or a corresponding median $V$-band obscuration of $A_\mathrm{v}$=540$^{+80}_{-40}$mag, averaged along the line of sight to the source of their restframe $\sim$200$\mu$m emission. We discuss the implications of this extreme attenuation by dust for the multiwavelength study of dusty starbursts and reddening-sensitive tracers of star formation.
  • We investigate the far-infrared properties of galaxies selected via deep, narrow-band imaging of the H$\alpha$ emission line in four redshift slices from $z=0.40$--$2.23$ over $\sim 1$deg$^2$ as part of the High-redshift Emission Line Survey (HiZELS). We use a stacking approach in the Herschel PACS/SPIRE bands, along with $850\,\mu$m imaging from SCUBA-2 to study the evolution of the dust properties of H$\alpha$-emitters selected above an evolving characteristic luminosity threshold, $0.2L^\star_{{\rm H}\alpha}(z)$. We investigate the relationship between the dust temperatures and the far-infrared luminosities of our stacked samples, finding that H$\alpha$-selection identifies cold, low-$L_{\rm IR}$ galaxies ($T_{\rm dust}\sim 14$k; $\log[L_{\rm IR}/{\rm L}_\odot]\sim 9.9$) at $z=0.40$, and more luminous, warmer systems ($T_{\rm dust}\sim 34$k; $\log[L_{\rm IR}/{\rm L}_\odot]\sim 11.5$) at $z=2.23$. Using a modified greybody model, we estimate "characteristic sizes" for the dust-emitting regions of HiZELS galaxies of $\sim 0.5$kpc, nearly an order of magnitude smaller than their stellar continuum sizes, which may provide indirect evidence of clumpy ISM structure. Lastly, we measure the dust masses from our far-IR SEDs along with metallicity-dependent gas-to-dust ratios ($\delta_{\rm GDR}$) to measure typical molecular gas masses of $\sim 10^{10}$M$_\odot$ for these bright H$\alpha$-emitters. The gas depletion timescales are shorter than the Hubble time at each redshift, suggesting probable replenishment of their gas reservoirs from the intergalactic medium. Based on the number density of H$\alpha$-selected galaxies, we find that typical star-forming galaxies brighter than $0.2L^{\star}_{{\rm H}\alpha}(z)$ host a significant fraction ($35\pm10$%) of the total gas content of the Universe, consistent with the predictions of the latest cosmological simulations.
  • We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z=0.28-1.65 (median redshift z=0.84). Our sample are representative of star-forming, main-sequence galaxies, with star-formation rates of SFR=0.1-30Mo/yr and stellar masses M=10^8-10^11Mo. For 49+/-4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24+/-3% are unresolved systems and 5+/-2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30kpc scales. The remaining 22+/-5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j*=J/M*\propto M^(2/3) but with a redshift evolution that scales as j*\propto M^{2/3}(1+z)^(-1). We identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum, log(j*/M^(2/3))>2.5, are the most stable, with Toomre Q=1.10+/-0.18, compared to Q=0.53+/-0.22 for galaxies with log(j*/M^(2/3))<2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z~1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, appear to be globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structures.
  • We present dynamical measurements for 586 H-alpha detected star-forming galaxies from the KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) Redshift One Spectroscopic Survey (KROSS). The sample represents typical star-forming galaxies at this redshift (z=0.6-1.0), with a median star formation rate of ~7 Msol/yr and a stellar mass range of log[M/Msol]~9-11. We find that the rotation velocity-stellar mass relationship (the inverse of the Tully-Fisher relationship) for our rotationally-dominated sources (v/sigma>1) has a consistent slope and normalisation as that observed for z=0 disks. In contrast, the specific angular momentum (j; angular momentum divided by stellar mass), is ~0.2-0.3 dex lower on average compared to z=0 disks. The specific angular momentum scales as M^[0.6+/-0.2], consistent with that expected for dark matter (i.e., proportional to M^[2/3]). We find that z~0.9 star-forming galaxies have decreasing specific angular momentum with increasing Sersic index. Visually, the sources with the highest specific angular momentum, for a given mass, have the most disk-dominated morphologies. This implies that an angular momentum-mass-morphology relationship, similar to that observed in local massive galaxies, is already in place by z~1.
  • We present the first results from our on-going Australia Telescope Compact Array survey of CO(1-0) in ALMA-identified submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. Strong detections of CO(1-0) emission from two submillimetre galaxies, ALESS 122.1 (z = 2.0232) and ALESS 67.1 (z = 2.1230), were obtained. We estimate gas masses of M_gas ~ 1.3 \times 10^{11} M_odot and M_gas ~ 1.0 \times 10^{11} M_\odot for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, adopting alpha_CO = 1.0. Dynamical mass estimates from the kinematics of the CO(1-0) line yields M_dyn (sin i)^2 = 2.1 +- 1.1 \times 10^{11} M_odot and (3.2 +- 0.9) \times 10^{11} M_\odot for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively. This is consistent with the total baryonic mass estimates of these two systems. We examine star formation efficiency using the L_FIR versus L'_CO(1-0) relation for samples of local ULIRGs and LIRGs, and more distant star-forming galaxies, with CO(1-0) detections. We find some evidence of a shallower slope for ULIRGs and SMGs compared to less luminous systems, but a larger sample is required for definite conclusions. We determine gas-to-dust ratios of 170 +- 30 and 140 +- 30 for ALESS 122.1 and ALESS 67.1, respectively, showing ALESS 122.1 has an unusually large gas reservoir. By combining the 38.1 GHz continuum detection of ALESS 122.1 with 1.4 and 5.5 GHz data, we estimate that the free-free contribution to radio emission at 38.1 GHz is 34 +- 17 microJy, yielding a star formation rate (1400 +- 700 M_\odot yr^{-1}) consistent with that from the infrared luminosity.
  • We report the result from observations conducted with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to detect [CII] 158 um fine structure line emission from galaxies embedded in one of the most spectacular Lyman-alpha blobs (LABs) at z=3.1, SSA22-LAB1. Of three dusty star-forming galaxies previously discovered by ALMA 860 um dust continuum survey toward SSA22-LAB1, we detected the [CII] line from one, LAB1-ALMA3 at z=3.0993+/-0.0004. No line emission was detected, associated with the other ALMA continuum sources or from three rest-frame UV/optical selected z_spec~3.1 galaxies within the field of view. For LAB1-ALMA3, we find relatively bright [CII] emission compared to the infrared luminosity (L_[CII]/L_[CII]) and an extremely high [CII] 158 um and [NII] 205 um emission line ratio (L_[CII]/L_[NII]>55). The relatively strong [CII] emission may be caused by abundant photodissociation regions and sub-solar metallicity, or by shock heating. The origin of the unusually strong [CII] emission could be causally related to the location within the giant LAB, although the relationship between extended Lyman-alpha emission and ISM conditions of associated galaxies is yet to be understand.
  • We present results from a deep 2'x3' (comoving scale of 3.7 Mpc x 5.5 Mpc at z=3) survey at 1.1 mm taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the SSA22 field. We observe the core region of a z = 3.09 protocluster, achieving a typical rms sensitivity of 60 micro-Jy/beam at a spatial resolution of 0".7. We detect 18 robust ALMA sources at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 5. Comparison between the ALMA map and a 1.1 mm map taken with the AzTEC camera on the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) indicates that three submillimeter sources discovered by the AzTEC/ASTE survey are resolved into eight individual submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) by ALMA. At least ten of our 18 ALMA SMGs have spectroscopic redshifts of z = 3.09, placing them in the protocluster. This shows that a number of dusty starburst galaxies are forming simultaneously in the core of the protocluster. The nine brightest ALMA SMGs with SNR > 10 have a median intrinsic angular size of 0".32+0".13-0".06 (2.4+1.0-0.4 physical kpc at z = 3.09), which is consistent with previous size measurements of SMGs in other fields. As expected the source counts show a possible excess compared to the counts in the general fields at S_1.1mm >= 1.0 mJy due to the protocluster. Our contiguous mm mapping highlights the importance of large-scale structures on the formation of dusty starburst galaxies.
  • We present the CAlibrating LYMan-$\alpha$ with H$\alpha$ (CALYMHA) pilot survey and new results on Lyman-$\alpha$ (Lya) selected galaxies at z~2. We use a custom-built Lya narrow-band filter at the Isaac Newton Telescope, designed to provide a matched volume coverage to the z=2.23 Ha HiZELS survey. Here we present the first results for the COSMOS and UDS fields. Our survey currently reaches a 3$\sigma$ line flux limit of ~4x10$^{-17}$ erg/s/cm$^{2}$, and a Lya luminosity limit of ~10$^{42.3}$ erg/s. We find 188 Lya emitters over 7.3x10$^5$ Mpc$^{3}$, but also find significant numbers of other line emitting sources corresponding to HeII, CIII] and CIV emission lines. These sources are important contaminants, and we carefully remove them, unlike most previous studies. We find that the Lya luminosity function at z=2.23 is very well described by a Schechter function up to L~10$^{43}$ erg/s with L$^*=10^{42.59+-0.05}$ erg/s, $\phi^*=10^{-3.09+-0.08}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ and $\alpha$=-1.75+-0.15. Above L~10$^{43}$ erg/s the Lya luminosity function becomes power-law like, driven by X-ray AGN. We find that Lya-selected emitters have a high escape fraction of 37+-7%, anti-correlated with Lya luminosity and correlated with Lya equivalent width. Lya emitters have ubiquitous large (~40 kpc) Lya haloes, 2x larger than their Ha extents. By directly comparing our Lya and Ha luminosity functions we find that the global/overall escape fraction of Lya photons (within a 13 kpc radius) from the full population of star-forming galaxies is 5.1+-0.2% at the peak of the star formation history. An extra 3.3+-0.3% of Lya photons likely still escape, but at larger radii.
  • Until recently, only a handful of dusty, star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) were known at $z>4$, most of them significantly amplified by gravitational lensing. Here, we have increased the number of such DSFGs substantially, selecting galaxies from the uniquely wide 250-, 350- and 500-$\mu$m Herschel-ATLAS imaging survey on the basis of their extremely red far-infrared colors and faint 350- and 500-$\mu$m flux densities - ergo they are expected to be largely unlensed, luminous, rare and very distant. The addition of ground-based continuum photometry at longer wavelengths from the JCMT and APEX allows us to identify the dust peak in their SEDs, better constraining their redshifts. We select the SED templates best able to determine photometric redshifts using a sample of 69 high-redshift, lensed DSFGs, then perform checks to assess the impact of the CMB on our technique, and to quantify the systematic uncertainty associated with our photometric redshifts, $\sigma=0.14\,(1+z)$, using a sample of 25 galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts, each consistent with our color selection. For Herschel-selected ultrared galaxies with typical colors of $S_{500}/S_{250}\sim 2.2$ and $S_{500}/S_{350}\sim 1.3$ and flux densities, $S_{500}\sim 50\,$mJy, we determine a median redshift, $\hat{z}_{\rm phot}=3.66$, an interquartile redshift range, 3.30$-$4.27, with a median rest-frame 8$-$1000-$\mu$m luminosity, $\hat{L}_{\rm IR}$, of $1.3\times 10^{13}\,$L$_\odot$. A third lie at $z>4$, suggesting a space density, $\rho_{z>4}$, of $\approx 6 \times 10^{-7}\,$Mpc$^{-3}$. Our sample contains the most luminous known star-forming galaxies, and the most over-dense cluster of starbursting proto-ellipticals yet found.
  • Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) are among the most luminous dusty galaxies in the Universe, but their true nature remains unclear; are SMGs the progenitors of the massive elliptical galaxies we see in the local Universe, or are they just a short-lived phase among more typical star-forming galaxies? To explore this problem further, we investigate the clustering of SMGs identified in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We use a catalogue of submillimetre ($850\mu$m) source identifications derived using a combination of radio counterparts and colour/IR selection to analyse a sample of 914 SMGs in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS), making this the largest high redshift sample of these galaxies to date. Using angular cross-correlation techniques, we estimate the halo masses for this large sample of SMGs and compare them with passive and star-forming galaxies selected in the same field. We find that SMGs, on average, occupy high-mass dark matter halos (M$_{\text{halo}} >10^{13}$M$_{\odot}$) at redshifts $z > 2.5$, consistent with being the progenitors of massive quiescent galaxies in present-day galaxy clusters. We also find evidence of downsizing, in which SMG activity shifts to lower mass halos at lower redshifts. In terms of their clustering and halo masses, SMGs appear to be consistent with other star-forming galaxies at a given redshift.
  • Understanding galaxy formation and evolution requires studying the interplay between the growth of galaxies and the growth of their black holes across cosmic time. Here we explore a sample of Ha-selected star-forming galaxies from the HiZELS survey and use the wealth of multi-wavelength data in the COSMOS field (X-rays, far-infrared and radio) to study the relative growth rates between typical galaxies and their central supermassive black holes, from z=2.23 to z=0. Typical star-forming galaxies at z~1-2 have black hole accretion rates (BHARs) of 0.001-0.01 Msun/yr and star formation rates (SFRs) of ~10-40 Msun/yr, and thus grow their stellar mass much quicker than their black hole mass (~3.3 orders of magnitude faster). However, ~3% of the sample (the sources detected directly in the X-rays) show a significantly quicker growth of the black hole mass (up to 1.5 orders of magnitude quicker growth than the typical sources). BHARs fall from z=2.23 to z=0, with the decline resembling that of star formation rate density or the typical SFR. We find that the average black hole to galaxy growth (BHAR/SFR) is approximately constant for star-forming galaxies in the last 11 Gyrs. The relatively constant BHAR/SFR suggests that these two quantities evolve equivalently through cosmic time and with practically no delay between the two.