• String matching is the problem of deciding whether a given $n$-bit string contains a given $k$-bit pattern. We study the complexity of this problem in three settings. Communication complexity. For small $k$, we provide near-optimal upper and lower bounds on the communication complexity of string matching. For large $k$, our bounds leave open an exponential gap; we exhibit some evidence for the existence of a better protocol. Circuit complexity. We present several upper and lower bounds on the size of circuits with threshold and DeMorgan gates solving the string matching problem. Similarly to the above, our bounds are near-optimal for small $k$. Learning. We consider the problem of learning a hidden pattern of length at most $k$ relative to the classifier that assigns 1 to every string that contains the pattern. We prove optimal bounds on the VC dimension and sample complexity of this problem.
  • Given an arbitrary graph $G$ we study the chromatic number of a random subgraph $G_{1/2}$ obtained from $G$ by removing each edge independently with probability $1/2$. Studying $\chi(G_{1/2})$ has been suggested by Bukh~\cite{Bukh}, who asked whether $\mathbb{E}[\chi(G_{1/2})] \geq \Omega( \chi(G)/\log(\chi(G)))$ holds for all graphs $G$. In this paper we show that for any graph $G$ with chromatic number $k = \chi(G)$ and for all $d \leq k^{1/3}$ it holds that $\Pr[\chi(G_{1/2}) \leq d] < \exp \left(- \Omega\left(\frac{k(k-d^3)}{d^3}\right)\right)$. In particular, $\Pr[G_{1/2} \text{ is bipartite}] < \exp \left(- \Omega \left(k^2 \right)\right)$. The later bound is tight up to a constant in $\Omega(\cdot)$, and is attained when $G$ is the complete graph on $k$ vertices. As a technical lemma, that may be of independent interest, we prove that if in \emph{any} $d^3$ coloring of the vertices of $G$ there are at least $t$ monochromatic edges, then $\Pr[\chi(G_{1/2}) \leq d] < e^{- \Omega\left(t\right)}$. We also prove that for any graph $G$ with chromatic number $k = \chi(G)$ and independence number $\alpha(G) \leq O(n/k)$ it holds that $\mathbb{E}[\chi(G_{1/2})] \geq \Omega \left( k/\log(k) \right)$. This gives a positive answer to the question of Bukh for a large family of graphs.
  • A $(k,\varepsilon)$-non-malleable extractor is a function ${\sf nmExt} : \{0,1\}^n \times \{0,1\}^d \to \{0,1\}$ that takes two inputs, a weak source $X \sim \{0,1\}^n$ of min-entropy $k$ and an independent uniform seed $s \in \{0,1\}^d$, and outputs a bit ${\sf nmExt}(X, s)$ that is $\varepsilon$-close to uniform, even given the seed $s$ and the value ${\sf nmExt}(X, s')$ for an adversarially chosen seed $s' \neq s$. Dodis and Wichs~(STOC 2009) showed the existence of $(k, \varepsilon)$-non-malleable extractors with seed length $d = \log(n-k-1) + 2\log(1/\varepsilon) + 6$ that support sources of entropy $k > \log(d) + 2 \log(1/\varepsilon) + 8$. We show that the foregoing bound is essentially tight, by proving that any $(k,\varepsilon)$-non-malleable extractor must satisfy the entropy bound $k > \log(d) + 2 \log(1/\varepsilon) - \log\log(1/\varepsilon) - C$ for an absolute constant $C$. In particular, this implies that non-malleable extractors require min-entropy at least $\Omega(\log\log(n))$. This is in stark contrast to the existence of strong seeded extractors that support sources of entropy $k = O(\log(1/\varepsilon))$. Our techniques strongly rely on coding theory. In particular, we reveal an inherent connection between non-malleable extractors and error correcting codes, by proving a new lemma which shows that any $(k,\varepsilon)$-non-malleable extractor with seed length $d$ induces a code $C \subseteq \{0,1\}^{2^k}$ with relative distance $0.5 - 2\varepsilon$ and rate $\frac{d-1}{2^k}$.
  • A key feature of neural network architectures is their ability to support the simultaneous interaction among large numbers of units in the learning and processing of representations. However, how the richness of such interactions trades off against the ability of a network to simultaneously carry out multiple independent processes -- a salient limitation in many domains of human cognition -- remains largely unexplored. In this paper we use a graph-theoretic analysis of network architecture to address this question, where tasks are represented as edges in a bipartite graph $G=(A \cup B, E)$. We define a new measure of multitasking capacity of such networks, based on the assumptions that tasks that \emph{need} to be multitasked rely on independent resources, i.e., form a matching, and that tasks \emph{can} be multitasked without interference if they form an induced matching. Our main result is an inherent tradeoff between the multitasking capacity and the average degree of the network that holds \emph{regardless of the network architecture}. These results are also extended to networks of depth greater than $2$. On the positive side, we demonstrate that networks that are random-like (e.g., locally sparse) can have desirable multitasking properties. Our results shed light into the parallel-processing limitations of neural systems and provide insights that may be useful for the analysis and design of parallel architectures.
  • The sorting number of a graph with $n$ vertices is the minimum depth of a sorting network with $n$ inputs and outputs that uses only the edges of the graph to perform comparisons. Many known results on sorting networks can be stated in terms of sorting numbers of different classes of graphs. In this paper we show the following general results about the sorting number of graphs. Any $n$-vertex graph that contains a simple path of length $d$ has a sorting network of depth $O(n \log(n/d))$. Any $n$-vertex graph with maximal degree $\Delta$ has a sorting network of depth $O(\Delta n)$. We also provide several results that relate the sorting number of a graph with its routing number, size of its maximal matching, and other well known graph properties. Additionally, we give some new bounds on the sorting number for some typical graphs.
  • We present an adaptive tester for the unateness property of Boolean functions. Given a function $f:\{0,1\}^n \to \{0,1\}$ the tester makes $O(n \log(n)/\epsilon)$ adaptive queries to the function. The tester always accepts a unate function, and rejects with probability at least 0.9 if a function is $\epsilon$-far from being unate.
  • For a finite undirected graph $G = (V,E)$, let $p_{u,v}(t)$ denote the probability that a continuous-time random walk starting at vertex $u$ is in $v$ at time $t$. In this note we give an example of a Cayley graph $G$ and two vertices $u,v \in G$ for which the function \[ r_{u,v}(t) = \frac{p_{u,v}(t)}{p_{u,u}(t)} \qquad t \geq 0 \] is not monotonically non-decreasing. This answers a question asked by Peres in 2013.
  • We consider the robustness of computational hardness of problems whose input is obtained by applying independent random deletions to worst-case instances. For some classical $NP$-hard problems on graphs, such as Coloring, Vertex-Cover, and Hamiltonicity, we examine the complexity of these problems when edges (or vertices) of an arbitrary graph are deleted independently with probability $1-p > 0$. We prove that for $n$-vertex graphs, these problems remain as hard as in the worst-case, as long as $p > \frac{1}{n^{1-\epsilon}}$ for arbitrary $\epsilon \in (0,1)$, unless $NP \subseteq BPP$. We also prove hardness results for Constraint Satisfaction Problems, where random deletions are applied to clauses or variables, as well as the Subset-Sum problem, where items of a given instance are deleted at random.
  • For two functions $f,g:\{0,1\}^n\to\{0,1\}$ a mapping $\psi:\{0,1\}^n\to\{0,1\}^n$ is said to be a $\textit{mapping from $f$ to $g$}$ if it is a bijection and $f(z)=g(\psi(z))$ for every $z\in\{0,1\}^n$. In this paper we study Lipschitz mappings between boolean functions. Our first result gives a construction of a $C$-Lipschitz mapping from the ${\sf Majority}$ function to the ${\sf Dictator}$ function for some universal constant $C$. On the other hand, there is no $n/2$-Lipschitz mapping in the other direction, namely from the ${\sf Dictator}$ function to the ${\sf Majority}$ function. This answers an open problem posed by Daniel Varga in the paper of Benjamini et al. (FOCS 2014). We also show a mapping from ${\sf Dictator}$ to ${\sf XOR}$ that is 3-local, 2-Lipschitz, and its inverse is $O(\log(n))$-Lipschitz, where by $L$-local mapping we mean that each of its output bits depends on at most $L$ input bits. Next, we consider the problem of finding functions such that any mapping between them must have large \emph{average stretch}, where the average stretch of a mapping $\phi$ is defined as ${\sf avgStretch}(\phi) = {\mathbb E}_{x,i}[dist(\phi(x),\phi(x+e_i)]$. We show that any mapping $\phi$ from ${\sf XOR}$ to ${\sf Majority}$ must satisfy ${\sf avgStretch}(\phi) \geq \Omega(\sqrt{n})$. In some sense, this gives a "function analogue" to the question of Benjamini et al. (FOCS 2014), who asked whether there exists a set $A \subset \{0,1\}^n$ of density 0.5 such that any bijection from $\{0,1\}^{n-1}$ to $A$ has large average stretch. Finally, we show that for a random balanced function $f:\{0,1\}^n\to\{0,1\}^n$ with high probability there is a mapping $\phi$ from ${\sf Dictator}$ to $f$ such that both $\phi$ and $\phi^{-1}$ have constant average stretch. In particular, this implies that one cannot obtain lower bounds on average stretch by taking uniformly random functions.
  • In this paper we consider an excited random walk on $\mathbb{Z}$ in identically piled periodic environment. This is a discrete time process on $\mathbb{Z}$ defined by parameters $(p_1,\dots p_M) \in [0,1]^M$ for some positive integer $M$, where the walker upon the $i$-th visit to $z \in \mathbb{Z}$ moves to $z+1$ with probability $p_{i\pmod M}$, and moves to $z-1$ with probability $1-p_{i \pmod M}$. We give an explicit formula in terms of the parameters $(p_1,\dots,p_M)$ which determines whether the walk is recurrent, transient to the left, or transient to the right. In particular, in the case that $\frac{1}{M}\sum_{i=1}^{M}p_{i}=\frac {1}{2}$ all behaviors are possible, and may depend on the order of the $p_i$. Our framework allows us to reprove some known results on ERW with no additional effort.
  • We define the following parameter of connected graphs. For a given graph $G$ we place one agent in each vertex of $G$. Every pair of agents sharing a common edge is declared to be acquainted. In each round we choose some matching of $G$ (not necessarily a maximal matching), and for each edge in the matching the agents on this edge swap places. After the swap, again, every pair of agents sharing a common edge become acquainted, and the process continues. We define the \emph{acquaintance time} of a graph $G$, denoted by $AC(G)$, to be the minimal number of rounds required until every two agents are acquainted. We first study the acquaintance time for some natural families of graphs including the path, expanders, the binary tree, and the complete bipartite graph. We also show that for all positive integers $n$ and $k \leq n^{1.5}$ there exists an $n$-vertex graph $G$ such that $AC(G) =\Theta(k)$. We also prove that for all $n$-vertex connected graphs $G$ we have $AC(G) = O\left(\frac{n^2}{\log(n)/\log\log(n)}\right)$, improving the $O(n^2)$ trivial upper bound achieved by sequentially letting each agent perform depth-first search along a spanning tree of $G$. Studying the computational complexity of this problem, we prove that for any constant $t \geq 1$ the problem of deciding that a given graph $G$ has $AC(G) \leq t$ or $AC(G) \geq 2t$ is $\mathcal{NP}$-complete. That is, $AC(G)$ is $\mathcal{NP}$-hard to approximate within multiplicative factor of 2, as well as within any additive constant factor. On the algorithmic side, we give a deterministic algorithm that given a graph $G$ with $AC(G)=1$ finds a ${\lceil n/c\rceil}$-rounds strategy for acquaintance in time $n^{c+O(1)}$. We also design a randomized polynomial time algorithm that given a graph $G$ with $AC(G)=1$ finds with high probability an $O(\log(n))$-rounds strategy for acquaintance.
  • We construct a bi-Lipschitz bijection from the Boolean cube to the Hamming ball of equal volume. More precisely, we show that for all even n there exists an explicit bijection f from the n-dimensional Boolean cube to the Hamming ball of equal volume embedded in (n+1)-dimensional Boolean cube, such that for all x and y it holds that distance(x,y) / 5 <= distance(f(x),f(y)) <= 4 distance(x,y) where distance(,) denotes the Hamming distance. In particular, this implies that the Hamming ball is bi-Lipschitz transitive. This result gives a strong negative answer to an open problem of Lovett and Viola [CC 2012], who raised the question in the context of sampling distributions in low-level complexity classes. The conceptual implication is that the problem of proving lower bounds in the context of sampling distributions will require some new ideas beyond the sensitivity-based structural results of Boppana [IPL 97]. We study the mapping f further and show that it (and its inverse) are computable in DLOGTIME-uniform TC0, but not in AC0. Moreover, we prove that f is "approximately local" in the sense that all but the last output bit of f are essentially determined by a single input bit.
  • In this note we confirm a conjecture raised by Benjamini et al. \cite{BST} on the acquaintance time of graphs, proving that for all graphs $G$ with $n$ vertices it holds that $\AC(G) = O(n^{3/2})$, which is tight up to a multiplicative constant. This is done by proving that for all graphs $G$ with $n$ vertices and maximal degree $\Delta$ it holds that $\AC(G) \leq 20 \Delta n$. Combining this with the bound $\AC(G) \leq O(n^2/\Delta)$ from \cite{BST} gives the foregoing uniform upper bound of all $n$-vertex graphs. We also prove that for the $n$-vertex path $P_n$ it holds that $\AC(P_n)=n-2$. In addition we show that the barbell graph $B_n$ consisting of two cliques of sizes $\ceil{n/2}$ and $\floor{n/2}$ connected by a single edge also has $\AC(B_n) = n-2$. This shows that it is possible to add $\Omega(n^2)$ edges to $P_n$ without changing the $\AC$ value of the graph.
  • We study a discrete time self interacting random process on graphs, which we call Greedy Random Walk. The walker is located initially at some vertex. As time evolves, each vertex maintains the set of adjacent edges touching it that have not been crossed yet by the walker. At each step, the walker being at some vertex, picks an adjacent edge among the edges that have not traversed thus far according to some (deterministic or randomized) rule. If all the adjacent edges have already been traversed, then an adjacent edge is chosen uniformly at random. After picking an edge the walk jumps along it to the neighboring vertex. We show that the expected edge cover time of the greedy random walk is linear in the number of edges for certain natural families of graphs. Examples of such graphs include the complete graph, even degree expanders of logarithmic girth, and the hypercube graph. We also show that GRW is transient in $\Z^d$ for all $d \geq 3$.