• Photospheric vortex flows are thought to play a key role in the evolution of magnetic fields. Recent studies show that these swirling motions are ubiquitous in the solar surface convection and occur in a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. Their interplay with magnetic fields is poorly characterized, however. We study the relation between a persistent photospheric vortex flow and the evolution of a network magnetic element at a supergranular vertex. We used long-duration sequences of continuum intensity images acquired with Hinode and the local correlation-tracking method to derive the horizontal photospheric flows. Supergranular cells are detected as large-scale divergence structures in the flow maps. At their vertices, and cospatial with network magnetic elements, the velocity flows converge on a central point. One of these converging flows is observed as a vortex during the whole 24 h time series. It consists of three consecutive vortices that appear nearly at the same location. At their core, a network magnetic element is also detected. Its evolution is strongly correlated to that of the vortices. The magnetic feature is concentrated and evacuated when it is caught by the vortices and is weakened and fragmented after the whirls disappear. This evolutionary behavior supports the picture presented previously, where a small flux tube becomes stable when it is surrounded by a vortex flow.
  • We study the dynamics and topology of an emerging magnetic flux concentration using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board the Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory. We obtain the full vector magnetic field and the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity through inversions of the Fe I line at 525.02 nm with the SPINOR code. The derived vector magnetic field is used to trace magnetic field lines. Two magnetic flux concentrations with different polarity and LOS velocities are found to be connected by a group of arch-shaped magnetic field lines. The positive polarity footpoint is weaker (1100 G) and displays an upflow, while the negative polarity footpoint is stronger (2200 G) and shows a downflow. This configuration is naturally interpreted as a siphon flow along an arched magnetic flux tube.
  • We study the relation between mesogranular flows, convectively driven sinks and magnetic fields using high spatial resolution spectropolarimetric data acquired with the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment on board Sunrise. We obtain the horizontal velocity flow fields of two quiet-Sun regions (31.2 $\times$ 31.2 Mm$^{2}$) via local correlation tracking. Mesogranular lanes and the central position of sinks are identified using Lagrange tracers. We find $6.7\times10^{-2}$ sinks per Mm$^{2}$ in the two observed regions. The sinks are located at the mesogranular vertices and turn out to be associated with (1) horizontal velocity flows converging to a central point and (2) long-lived downdrafts. The spatial distribution of magnetic fields in the quiet Sun is also examined. The strongest magnetic fields are preferentially located at sinks. We find that 40 \% of the pixels with longitudinal component of the magnetic field stronger than 500 G are located in the close neighborhood of sinks. In contrast, the small-scale magnetic loops detected by Mart\'{i}nez Gonz\'{a}lez et al. in the same two observed areas do not show any preferential distribution at mesogranular scales. The study of individual examples reveals that sinks can play an important role in the evolution of quiet-Sun magnetic features.
  • We report on the dynamical interaction of quiet-Sun magnetic fields and granular convection in the solar photosphere as seen by \textsc{Sunrise}. We use high spatial resolution (0\farcs 15--0\farcs 18) and temporal cadence (33 s) spectropolarimetric Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment data, together with simultaneous CN and Ca\,\textsc{ii}\,H filtergrams from \textsc{Sunrise} Filter Imager. We apply the SIR inversion code to the polarimetric data in order to infer the line of sight velocity and vector magnetic field in the photosphere. The analysis reveals bundles of individual flux tubes evolving as a single entity during the entire 23 minute data set. The group shares a common canopy in the upper photospheric layers, while the individual tubes continually intensify, fragment and merge in the same way that chains of bright points in photometric observations have been reported to do. The evolution of the tube cores are driven by the local granular convection flows. They intensify when they are "compressed" by surrounding granules and split when they are "squeezed" between two moving granules. The resulting fragments are usually later regrouped in intergranular lanes by the granular flows. The continual intensification, fragmentation and coalescence of flux results in magnetic field oscillations of the global entity. From the observations we conclude that the magnetic field oscillations first reported by \citet{2011ApJ...730L..37M} correspond to the forcing by granular motions and not to characteristic oscillatory modes of thin flux tubes.
  • Isolated flux tubes are considered to be fundamental magnetic building blocks of the solar photosphere. Their formation is usually attributed to the concentration of magnetic field to kG strengths by the convective collapse mechanism. However, the small size of the magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has prevented this scenario from being studied in fully resolved structures. Here we report on the formation and subsequent evolution of one such photospheric magnetic flux tube, observed in the quiet Sun with unprecedented spatial resolution (0\farcs 15 - 0\farcs 18) and high temporal cadence (33 s). The observations were acquired by the Imaging Magnetograph Experiment (IMaX) aboard the \textsc{Sunrise} balloon-borne solar observatory. The equipartition field strength magnetic element is the result of the merging of several same polarity magnetic flux patches, including a footpoint of a previously emerged loop. The magnetic structure is then further intensified to kG field strengths by convective collapse. The fine structure found within the flux concentration reveals that the scenario is more complex than can be described by a thin flux tube model with bright points and downflow plumes being established near the edges of the kG magnetic feature. We also observe a daisy-like alignment of surrounding granules and a long-lived inflow towards the magnetic feature. After a subsequent weakening process, the field is again intensified to kG strengths. The area of the magnetic feature is seen to change in anti-phase with the field strength, while the brightness of the bright points and the speed of the downflows varies in phase. We also find a relation between the brightness of the bright point and the presence of upflows within it.