• First-order Fermi acceleration processes at ultrarelativistic shocks are studied with Monte Carlo simulations. The accelerated particle spectra are derived by integrating the exact particle trajectories in a turbulent magnetic field near the shock. ''Realistic'' features of the field structure are included. We show that the main acceleration process at superluminal shocks is the particle compression at the shock. Formation of energetic spectral tails is possible in a limited energy range only for highly perturbed magnetic fields, with cutoffs occuring at low energies within the resonance energy range considered. These spectral features result from the anisotropic character of particle transport in the downstream magnetic field, where field compression produces effectively 2D perturbations. Because of the downstream field compression, the acceleration process is inefficient in parallel shocks for larger turbulence amplitudes, and features observed in oblique shocks are recovered. For small-amplitude turbulence, wide-energy range particle spectra are formed and modifications of the process due to the existence of long-wave perturbations are observed. In both sub- and superluminal shocks, an increase of \gamma leads to steeper spectra with lower cut-off energies. The spectra obtained for the ``realistic'' background conditions assumed here do not converge to the ``universal'' spectral index claimed in the literature. Thus the role of the first-order Fermi process in astrophysical sources hosting relativistic shocks requires serious reanalysis.
  • We present Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer in magnetar atmospheres. We include the effects of vacuum polarization, electron and proton scattering, and free-free absorption. Simulations are performed for the atmosphere model with the magnetic field perpendicular and also tilted with respect to the neutron star surface, and we show that the average spectrum does not strongly depend on the orientation of the magnetic field. We investigate the region of the parameter space where the vacuum absorption-like feature appears in the spectrum and we analyze the shape of the proton cyclotron line. Our results indicate that the existence of the vacuum polarization feature should be a general attribute of soft gamma-ray repeaters burst spectra, provided that the energy release takes place at the sufficiently dense region, and the atmosphere scaleheight is large enough. We discuss the existence of such a feature in recent observational data on these sources.