• In hierarchical models of galaxy formation, stellar tidal streams are expected around most, if not all, galaxies. Although these features may provide useful diagnostics of the $\Lambda$CDM model, their observational properties remain poorly constrained because they are challenging to detect and interpret and have been studied in detail for only a sparse sampling of galaxy population. More quantitative, systematic approaches are required. We advocate statistical analysis of the counts and properties of such features in archival wide-field imaging surveys for a direct comparison against results from numerical simulations. Thus, in this paper we aim to study systematically the frequency of occurrence and other observational properties of tidal features around nearby galaxies. The sample we construct will act as a foundational dataset for statistical comparison with cosmological models of galaxy formation. Our approach is based on a visual classification of diffuse features around a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies, using a post-processing of Sloan Digital Sky Survey imaging optimized for the detection of stellar structure with low surface brightness. At a limiting surface brightness of $28\ \mathrm{mag~arcsec^{-2}}$, 14% of the galaxies in our sample exhibit evidence of diffuse features likely to have arisen from minor merging events. Our technique recovers all previously known streams in our sample and yields a number of new candidates. Consistent with previous studies, coherent arc-like features and shells are the most common type of tidal structures found in this study. We conclude that although some detections are ambiguous and could be corroborated or refuted with deeper imaging, our technique provides a reliable foundation for the statistical analysis of diffuse circumgalactic features in wide-area imaging surveys, and for the identification of targets for follow-up studies.
  • Context: Anticyclonic vortices are considered as a favourable places for trapping dust and forming planetary embryos. On the other hand, they are massive blobs that can interact gravitationally with the planets in the disc. Aims: We aim to study how a vortex interacts gravitationally with a planet which migrates toward it or a planet which is created inside the vortex. Methods: We performed hydrodynamical simulations of a viscous locally isothermal disc using GFARGO and FARGO-ADSG. We set a stationary Gaussian pressure bump in the disc in a way that RWI is triggered. After a large vortex is established, we implanted a low mass planet in the outer disc or inside the vortex and allowed it to migrate. We also examined the effect of vortex strength on the planet migration and checked the validity of the final result in the presence of self-gravity. Results: We noticed regardless of the planet's initial position, the planet is finally locked to the vortex or its migration is stopped in a farther orbital distance in case of a stronger vortex. For the model with the weaker vortex, we studied the effect of different parameters such as background viscosity, background surface density, mass of the planet and different planet positions. In these models, while the trapping time and locking angle of the planet vary for different parameters, the main result, which is the planet-vortex locking, remains valid. We discovered that even a planet with a mass less than 5 * 10^{-7} M_{\star} comes out from the vortex and is locked to it at the same orbital distance. For a stronger vortex, both in non-self-gravitated and self-gravitating models, the planet migration is stopped far away from the radial position of the vortex. This effect can make the vortices a suitable place for continual planet formation under the condition that they save their shape during the planetary growth.
  • Context. Transition disks typically appear in resolved millimeter observations as giant dust rings surrounding their young host stars. More accurate observations with ALMA have shown several of these rings to be in fact asymmetric: they have lopsided shapes. It has been speculated that these rings act as dust traps, which would make them important laboratories for studying planet formation. It has been shown that an elongated giant vortex produced in a disk with a strong viscosity jump strikingly resembles the observed asymmetric rings. Aims. We aim to study a similar behavior for a disk in which a giant planet is embedded. However, a giant planet can induce two kinds of asymmetries: (1) a giant vortex, and (2) an eccentric disk. We studied under which conditions each of these can appear, and how one can observationally distinguish between them. This is important because only a vortex can trap particles both radially and azimuthally, while the eccentric ring can only trap particles in radial direction. Methods. We used the FARGO code to conduct the hydro-simulations. We set up a disk with an embedded giant planet and took a radial grid spanning from 0.1 to 7 times the planet semi-major axis. We ran the simulations with various viscosity values and planet masses for 1000 planet orbits to allow a fully developed vortex or disk eccentricity. Afterwards, we compared the dust distribution in a vortex-holding disk with an eccentric disk using dust simulations. Results. We find that vorticity and eccentricity are distinguishable by looking at the azimuthal contrast of the dust density. While vortices, as particle traps, produce very pronounced azimuthal asymmetries, eccentric features are not able to accumulate millimeter dust particles in azimuthal direction, and therefore the asymmetries are expected to be modest.
  • We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is $-21<M_R<-15$ mag. This paper (paper I) focuses on the measurement of the velocity dispersion and their error estimates. The measurements were performed using {\it pPXF (penalised PiXel Fitting)} and using the Calcium triplet absorption lines. We use Monte Carlo bootstrapping to study various sources of uncertainty in our measurements, namely statistical uncertainty, template mismatch and other systematics. We find that the main source of uncertainty is the template mismatch effect which is reduced by using templates with a range of spectral types. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we study the Faber-Jackson relation ($L\propto\sigma^\alpha$) and find that the slope of the relation is $\alpha=1.99\pm0.14$ for galaxies brighter than $M_R\simeq-16$ mag. A comprehensive analysis of the results combined with the photometric properties of these galaxies is reported in paper II.
  • Due to the advances in hardware technology and increase in production of multimedia data in many applications, during the last decades, multimedia databases have become increasingly important. Contentbased multimedia retrieval is one of an important research area in the field of multimedia databases. Lots of research on this field has led to proposition of different kinds of index structures to support fast and efficient similarity search to retrieve multimedia data from these databases. Due to variety and plenty of proposed index structures, we suggest a systematic framework based on partitioning method used in these structures to classify multimedia index structures, and then we evaluated these structures based on important functional measures. We hope this proposed framework will lead to empirical and technical comparison of multimedia index structures and development of more efficient structures at future.
  • A growing number of applications that generate massive streams of data need intelligent data processing and online analysis. Real-time surveillance systems, telecommunication systems, sensor networks and other dynamic environments are such examples. The imminent need for turning such data into useful information and knowledge augments the development of systems, algorithms and frameworks that address streaming challenges. The storage, querying and mining of such data sets are highly computationally challenging tasks. Mining data streams is concerned with extracting knowledge structures represented in models and patterns in non stopping streams of information. Generally, two main challenges are designing fast mining methods for data streams and need to promptly detect changing concepts and data distribution because of highly dynamic nature of data streams. The goal of this article is to analyze and classify the application of diverse data mining techniques in different challenges of data stream mining. In this paper, we present the theoretical foundations of data stream analysis and propose an analytical framework for data stream mining techniques.
  • Toward the formulation of the operational approach to quantum thermodynamics, the heat-up operator is explicitly constructed. This quantum operation generates for a generic system an irreversible transformation from a pure ground state at zero temperature to a state at finite temperature. The fixed point analysis shows that repeated applications of the operation map from an arbitrary state to the completely random state realized in the high-temperature limit. The change of the von Neumann entropy is evaluated for a simple bipartite spin-1/2 system. It is shown that remarkably, the second law of thermodynamics may be violated along processes generated by the present quantum operation.
  • Routers are one of the important entities in computer networks specially the Internet. Forwarding IP packets is a valuable and vital function in Internet routers. Routers extract destination IP address from packets and lookup those addresses in their own routing table. This task is called IP lookup. Internet address lookup is a challenging problem due to the increasing routing table sizes. Ternary Content-Addressable Memories (TCAMs) are becoming very popular for designing high-throughput address lookup-engines on routers: they are fast, cost-effective and simple to manage. Despite the TCAMs speed, their high power consumption is their major drawback. In this paper, Multilevel Enabling Technique (MLET), a power efficient TCAM based hardware architecture has been proposed. This scheme is employed after an Espresso-II minimization algorithm to achieve lower power consumption. The performance evaluation of the proposed approach shows that it can save considerable amount of routing table's power consumption.
  • We develop a general theory to account self-consistently for self-field effects upon the average transport critical current density Jc of a flat type-II superconducting strip in the mixed state when the bulk pinning is characterized by a field-dependent depinning critical current density Jp(B), where B is the local magnetic flux density. We first consider the possibility of both bulk and edge-pinning contributions but conclude that bulk pinning dominates over geometrical edge-barrier effects in state-of-the-art YBCO films and prototype second-generation coated conductors. We apply our theory using the Kim model, JpK(B) = JpK(0)/(1+|B|/B0), as an example. We calculate Jc(Ba) as a function of a perpendicular applied magnetic induction Ba and show how Jc(Ba) is related to JpK(B). We find that Jc(Ba) is very nearly equal to JpK(Ba) when Ba > Ba*, where Ba* is the value of Ba that makes the net flux density zero at the strip's edge. However, Jc(Ba) is suppressed relative to JpK(Ba) at low fields when Ba < Ba*, with the largest suppression occurring when Ba*/B0 is of order unity or larger.
  • We show how to calculate the magnetic-field and sheet-current distributions for a thin-film superconducting annular ring (inner radius a, outer radius b, and thickness d<<a) when either the penetration depth obeys lambda < d/2 or, if lambda > d/2, the two-dimensional screening length obeys Lambda = 2 lambda^2/d << a for the following cases: (a) magnetic flux trapped in the hole in the absence of an applied magnetic field, (b) zero magnetic flux in the hole when the ring is subjected to an applied magnetic field, and (c) focusing of magnetic flux into the hole when a magnetic field is applied but no net current flows around the ring. We use a similar method to calculate the magnetic-field and sheet-current distributions and magnetization loops for a thin, bulk-pinning-free superconducting disk (radius b) containing a dome of magnetic flux of radius a when flux entry is impeded by a geometrical barrier.
  • We investigate superconducting proximity effect in clean ferromagnetic layers with rough boundaries. The subgap density of states is formed by Andreev bound states at energies which depend on trajectory length and the ferromagnetic exchange field. At energies above the gap, the spectrum is governed by resonant scattering states. The resulting density of states, measurable by tunneling spectroscopy, exhibits a rich structure, which allows to connect the theoretical parameters from experiments.