• We construct a complexity-based morphospace to study systems-level properties of conscious & intelligent systems. The axes of this space label 3 complexity types: autonomous, cognitive & social. Given recent proposals to synthesize consciousness, a generic complexity-based conceptualization provides a useful framework for identifying defining features of conscious & synthetic systems. Based on current clinical scales of consciousness that measure cognitive awareness and wakefulness, we take a perspective on how contemporary artificially intelligent machines & synthetically engineered life forms measure on these scales. It turns out that awareness & wakefulness can be associated to computational & autonomous complexity respectively. Subsequently, building on insights from cognitive robotics, we examine the function that consciousness serves, & argue the role of consciousness as an evolutionary game-theoretic strategy. This makes the case for a third type of complexity for describing consciousness: social complexity. Having identified these complexity types, allows for a representation of both, biological & synthetic systems in a common morphospace. A consequence of this classification is a taxonomy of possible conscious machines. We identify four types of consciousness, based on embodiment: (i) biological consciousness, (ii) synthetic consciousness, (iii) group consciousness (resulting from group interactions), & (iv) simulated consciousness (embodied by virtual agents within a simulated reality). This taxonomy helps in the investigation of comparative signatures of consciousness across domains, in order to highlight design principles necessary to engineer conscious machines. This is particularly relevant in the light of recent developments at the crossroads of cognitive neuroscience, biomedical engineering, artificial intelligence & biomimetics.
  • How does our nervous system successfully acquire feedback control strategies in spite of a wide spectrum of response dynamics from different musculo-skeletal systems? The cerebellum is a crucial brain structure in enabling precise motor control in animals. Recent advances suggest that synaptic plasticity of cerebellar Purkinje cells involves molecular mechanisms that mimic the dynamics of the efferent motor system that they control allowing them to match the timing of their learning rule to behavior. Counter-Factual Predictive Control (CFPC) is a cerebellum-based feed-forward control scheme that exploits that principle for acquiring anticipatory actions. CFPC extends the classical Widrow-Hoff/Least Mean Squares by inserting a forward model of the downstream closed-loop system in its learning rule. Here we apply that same insight to the problem of learning the gains of a feedback controller. To that end, we frame a Model-Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) problem and derive an adaptive control scheme treating the gains of a feedback controller as if they were the weights of an adaptive linear unit. Our results demonstrate that rather than being exclusively confined to cerebellar learning, the approach of controlling plasticity with a forward model of the subsystem controlled, an approach that we term as Model-Enhanced Least Mean Squares (ME-LMS), can provide a solution to wide set of adaptive control problems.