• We present low-frequency (80-240 MHz) radio imaging of type III solar radio bursts observed by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) on 2015/09/21. The source region for each burst splits from one dominant component at higher frequencies into two increasingly-separated components at lower frequencies. For channels below ~132 MHz, the two components repetitively diverge at high speeds (0.1-0.4 c) along directions tangent to the limb, with each episode lasting just ~2 s. We argue that both effects result from the strong magnetic field connectivity gradient that the burst-driving electron beams move into. Persistence mapping of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) jets observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory reveals quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) associated with coronal null points, including separatrix dome, spine, and curtain structures. Electrons are accelerated at the flare site toward an open QSL, where the beams follow diverging field lines to produce the source splitting, with larger separations at larger heights (lower frequencies). The splitting motion within individual frequency bands is interpreted as a projected time-of-flight effect, whereby electrons traveling along the outer field lines take slightly longer to excite emission at adjacent positions. Given this interpretation, we estimate an average beam speed of 0.2 c. We also qualitatively describe the quiescent corona, noting in particular that a disk-center coronal hole transitions from being dark at higher frequencies to bright at lower frequencies, turning over around 120 MHz. These observations are compared to synthetic images based on the Magnetohydrodynamic Algorithm outside a Sphere (MAS) model, which we use to flux-calibrate the burst data.
  • An intense type IV radio burst was observed by the STEREO Behind (STB) spacecraft located about 144 degres behind Earth. The burst was associated with a large solar eruption that occurred on the backside of the Sun (N05E151) close to the disk center in the STB view. The eruption was also observed by the STEREO Ahead (STA) spacecraft (located at 149 degrees ahead of Earth) as an eruption close to the west limb (N05W60) in that view. The type IV burst was complete in STB observations in that the envelope reached the lowest frequency and then receded to higher frequencies. The burst was partial viewed from STA, revealing only the edge coming down to the lowest frequency. The type IV burst was not observed at all near Earth because the source was 61 degrees behind the east limb. The eruption was associated with a low-frequency type II burst observed in all three views, although it was not very intense. Solar energetic particles were also observed at both STEREOs and at SOHO, suggesting that the shock was much extended, consistent with the very high speed of the CME (about 2048 km/s). These observations suggest that the type IV emission is directed along a narrow cone above the flare site. We confirm this result statistically using the type IV bursts of solar cycle 23.
  • Electron density irregularities in the ionosphere are known to be magnetically anisotropic, preferentially elongated along the lines of force. While many studies of their morphology have been undertaken by topside sounding and whistler measurements, it is only recently that detailed regional-scale reconstructions have become possible, enabled by the advent of widefield radio telescopes. Here we present a new approach for visualising and studying field-aligned irregularities (FAIs), which involves transforming interferometric measurements of TEC gradients onto a magnetic shell tangent plane. This removes the perspective distortion associated with the oblique viewing angle of the irregularities from the ground, facilitating the decomposition of dynamics along and across magnetic field lines. We apply this transformation to the dataset of Loi et al. [2015a], obtained on 15 October 2013 by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope and displaying prominent FAIs. We study these FAIs in the new reference frame, quantifying field-aligned and field-transverse behaviour, examining time and altitude dependencies, and extending the analysis to FAIs on sub-array scales. We show that the inclination of the plane can be derived solely from the data, and verify that the best-fit value is consistent with the known magnetic inclination. The ability of the model to concentrate the fluctuations along a single spatial direction may find practical application to future calibration strategies for widefield interferometry, by providing a compact representation of FAI-induced distortions.
  • Geomagnetically-aligned density structures with a range of sizes exist in the near-Earth plasma environment, including 10-100 km-wide VLF/HF wave-ducting structures. Their small diameters and modest density enhancements make them difficult to observe, and there is limited evidence for any of the several formation mechanisms proposed to date. We present a case study of an event on 26 August 2014 where a travelling ionospheric disturbance (TID) shortly precedes the formation of a complex collection of field-aligned ducts, using data obtained by the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope. Their spatiotemporal proximity leads us to suggest a causal interpretation. Geomagnetic conditions were quiet at the time, and no obvious triggers were noted. Growth of the structures proceeds rapidly, within 0.5 hr of the passage of the TID, attaining their peak prominence 1-2 hr later and persisting for several more hours until observations ended at local dawn. Analyses of the next two days show field-aligned structures to be preferentially detectable under quiet rather than active geomagnetic conditions. We used a raster scanning strategy facilitated by the speed of electronic beamforming to expand the quasi-instantaneous field of view of the MWA by a factor of three. These observations represent the broadest angular coverage of the ionosphere by a radio telescope to date.
  • The fields of solar radiophysics and solar system radio physics, or radio heliophysics, will benefit immensely from an instrument with the capabilities projected for SKA. Potential applications include interplanetary scintillation (IPS), radio-burst tracking, and solar spectral radio imaging with a superior sensitivity. These will provide breakthrough new insights and results in topics of fundamental importance, such as the physics of impulsive energy releases, magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and turbulence, the dynamics of post-eruptive processes, energetic particle acceleration, the structure of the solar wind and the development and evolution of solar wind transients at distances up to and beyond the orbit of the Earth. The combination of the high spectral, time and spatial resolution and the unprecedented sensitivity of the SKA will radically advance our understanding of basic physical processes operating in solar and heliospheric plasmas and provide a solid foundation for the forecasting of space weather events.
  • Low-frequency, wide field-of-view (FoV) radio telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) enable the ionosphere to be sampled at high spatial completeness. We present the results of the first power spectrum analysis of ionospheric fluctuations in MWA data, where we examined the position offsets of radio sources appearing in two datasets. The refractive shifts in the positions of celestial sources are proportional to spatial gradients in the electron column density transverse to the line of sight. These can be used to probe plasma structures and waves in the ionosphere. The regional (10-100 km) scales probed by the MWA, determined by the size of its FoV and the spatial density of radio sources (typically thousands in a single FoV), complement the global (100-1000 km) scales of GPS studies and local (0.01-1 km) scales of radar scattering measurements. Our data exhibit a range of complex structures and waves. Some fluctuations have the characteristics of travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs), while others take the form of narrow, slowly-drifting bands aligned along the Earth's magnetic field.
  • Ionization of the Earth's atmosphere by sunlight forms a complex, multi-layered plasma environment within the Earth's magnetosphere, the innermost layers being the ionosphere and plasmasphere. The plasmasphere is believed to be embedded with cylindrical density structures (ducts) aligned along the Earth's magnetic field, but direct evidence for these remains scarce. Here we report the first direct wide-angle observation of an extensive array of field-aligned ducts bridging the upper ionosphere and inner plasmasphere, using a novel ground-based imaging technique. We establish their heights and motions by feature-tracking and parallax analysis. The structures are strikingly organized, appearing as regularly-spaced, alternating tubes of overdensities and underdensities strongly aligned with the Earth's magnetic field. These findings represent the first direct visual evidence for the existence of such structures.
  • The angular broadening of compact radio sources observed through a medium having turbulent density irregularities is usually estimated using the phase structure function. We employ an exact formulation for the phase structure function that helps in obtaining an accurate estimate of angular broadening when the baseline lengths are comparable to the inner scale of the turbulent spectrum.
  • We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9-201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of `low' to `medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low frequency radio interferometers come on-line over the next few years.
  • Three-wave interactions in plasmas are described, in the framework of kinetic theory, by the quadratic response tensor (QRT). The cold-plasma QRT is a common approximation for interactions between three fast waves. Here, the first-order thermal correction (FOTC) to the cold-plasma QRT is derived for interactions between three fast waves in a warm unmagnetized collisionless plasma, whose particles have an arbitrary isotropic distribution function. The FOTC to the cold-plasma QRT is shown to depend on the second moment of the distribution function, the phase speeds of the waves, and the interaction geometry. Previous calculations of the rate for second harmonic plasma emission (via Langmuir-wave coalescence) assume the cold-plasma QRT. The FOTC to the cold-plasma QRT is used here to calculate the FOTC to the second harmonic emission rate, and its importance is assessed in various physical situations. The FOTC significantly increases the rate when the ratio of the Langmuir phase speed to the electron thermal speed is less than about 3.
  • Evolution of a Langmuir wave is studied numerically for finite amplitudes slightly above the threshold which separates damping from nondamping cases. Arrest of linear damping is found to be a second-order effect due to ballistic evolution of perturbations, resonant power transfer between field and particles, and organization of phase space into a positive slope for the average distribution function $f_{av}$ around the resonant wave phase speed $v_\phi$. Near the threshold trapping in the wave potential does not arrest damping or saturate the subsequent growth phase.
  • Giant pulses and giant micropulses from pulsars are distinguished from normal pulsed emission by their large fluxes, rarity, approximately power-law distribution of fluxes and, typically, occurrence in restricted phase windows. Here existing observations of flux distributions are manipulated into a common format and interpreted in terms of theories for wave growth in inhomogeneous media, with the aim of constraining the emission mechanism and source physics for giant pulses and micropulses. Giant micropulses near 2 GHz (PSRs B8033-45 and B1706-44) and 0.4 GHz (PSR B0950+08) have indices $\alpha = 6.5 \pm 0.7$ for the probability distribution $P(E)$ of the electric field $E$, with $P(E) \propto E^{-\alpha}$. Giant pulses (PSRs B0531+24, B1937+214, and B1821-24) have $\alpha$ ranging from $4.6 \pm 0.2$ to $9 \pm 2$, possibly increasing with frequency. These are similar enough to regard giant micropulses and pulses as a single phenomenon with a common physical explanation. The power-law functional form and values of $\alpha$ observed are consistent with predictions for nonlinear wave collapse, but inconsistent with known self-organized critical systems, nonlinear decay processes, and elementary burst theory. While relativistic beaming may be important, its statistics are yet to be predicted theoretically and collapse is currently the favored interpretation. Other possibilities remain, including stochastic growth theory (consistent with normal pulse emission) and, less plausibly, refractive lensing. Unresolved issues remain for all four interpretations and suggestions for further work are given. The differences between normal and giant pulse emission suggest they have distinct source regions and emission processes.
  • Individual pulses from pulsars have intensity-phase profiles that differ widely from pulse to pulse, from the average profile, and from phase to phase within a pulse. Widely accepted explanations do not exist for this variability or for the mechanism producing the radiation. The variability corresponds to the field statistics, particularly the distribution of wave field amplitudes, which are predicted by theories for wave growth in inhomogeneous media. This paper shows that the field statistics of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) are well-defined and vary as a function of pulse phase, evolving from Gaussian intensity statistics off-pulse to approximately power-law and then lognormal distributions near the pulse peak to approximately power-law and eventually Gaussian statistics off-pulse again. Detailed single-component fits confirm that the variability corresponds to lognormal statistics near the peak of the pulse profile and Gaussian intensity statistics off-pulse. The lognormal field statistics observed are consistent with the prediction of stochastic growth theory (SGT) for a purely linear system close to marginal stability. The simplest interpretations are that the pulsar's variability is a direct manifestation of an SGT state and the emission mechanism is linear (either direct or indirect), with no evidence for nonlinear mechanisms like modulational instability and wave collapse which produce power-law field statistics. Stringent constraints are placed on nonlinear mechanisms: they must produce lognormal statistics when suitably ensemble-averaged. Field statistics are thus a powerful, potentially widely applicable tool for understanding variability and constraining mechanisms and source characteristics of coherent astrophysical and space emissions.
  • The variability of the Vela pulsar (PSR B0833-45) corresponds to well-defined field statistics that vary with pulsar phase, ranging from Gaussian intensity statistics off-pulse to approximately power-law statistics in a transition region and then lognormal statistics on-pulse, excluding giant micropulses. These data are analyzed here in terms of two superposed wave populations, using a new calculation for the amplitude statistics of two vectorially-combined transverse fields. Detailed analyses show that the approximately power-law and lognormal distributions observed are fitted well at essentially all on-pulse phases by Gaussian-lognormal and double-lognormal combinations, respectively. These good fits, plus the smooth but significant variations in fit parameters across the source, provide strong evidence that the approximately power-law statistics observed in the transition region are not intrinsic. Instead, the data are consistent with normal pulsar emission having lognormal statistics at all phases. This is consistent with generation in an inhomogeneous source obeying stochastic growth theory (SGT) and with the emission mechanism being purely linear (either direct or indirect). A nonlinear mechanism is viable only if it produces lognormal statistics when suitably ensemble-averaged. Variations in the SGT fit parameters with phase imply that the radiation is relatively more variable near the pulse edges than near the center, as found in earlier work. In contrast, Vela's giant micropulses come from a very restricted phase range and have power-law statistics with indices ($6.7 \pm 0.6$) not inconsistent with nonlinear wave collapse. These results imply that normal pulses have a different source and generation mechanism than giant micropulses, as suggested previously on other grounds.
  • Individual pulses from pulsars have intensity-phase profiles that differ widely from pulse to pulse, from the average profile, and from phase to phase within a pulse. Widely accepted explanations for pulsar radio emission and its time variability do not exist. Here, by analysing data near the peak of the Vela pulsar's average profile, we show that Vela's variability corresponds to lognormal field statistics, consistent with the prediction of stochastic growth theory (SGT) for a purely linear system close to marginal stability. Vela's variability is therefore a direct manifestation of an SGT state and the field statistics constrain the emission mechanism to be linear (either direct or indirect), ruling out nonlinear mechanisms like wave collapse. Field statistics are thus a powerful, potentially widely applicable tool for understanding variability and constraining mechanisms and source characteristics of coherent astrophysical and space emissions.