• We search for correlations between the [OI]6300 line, a well-known tracer of jets and winds in young stars, and stellar/disk/accretion properties in the young cluster NGC 2264, aiming to characterize the outflow phenomena that occur within the circumstellar environment. We analyzed FLAMES spectra of 184 stars, detecting the [OI]6300 line in 108 CTTSs and 2 Herbig AeBe stars. We identified the main features of this line: a high-velocity component (HVC), and a broad and narrow low-velocity components (BLVC and NLVC). We calculated their luminosities and kinematic properties, then compared with stellar/accretion parameters. The luminosity of the [OI]6300 line correlates positively with the stellar and accretion luminosity. The HVC is only detected among systems with optically thick inner disks; the BLVC is found in thick disk systems and few systems with anemic disks; and the NLVC is common among systems with all types of disks. Our BLVCs present blueshifts of up to 50km/s and widths compatible with an origin 0.05au-3au from the star. The NLVCs have centroid velocities and widths consistent with what may be expected for photoevaporative disk winds originating between 1 and 15au. The HVC is found most often among sources with irregular, aperiodic photometric variability, usually associated with accretion in an unstable regime. The mechanical luminosity transported by jets correlates positively with the accretion luminosity, but no stellar properties appear to significantly influence any property of these jets. We find jet velocities on average similar to those found in Taurus. We confirm earlier findings in Taurus which favor an inner MHD disk wind as the origin of the BLVC, while the NLVC might trace photoevaporative disk winds. The [OI]6300 line profile shows signs of evolving as the disk disperses, with the HVC and BLVC disappearing as the inner disk becomes optically thin.
  • Stellar clusters form by gravitational collapse of turbulent molecular clouds, with up to several thousand stars per cluster. They are thought to be the birthplace of most stars and therefore play an important role in our understanding of star formation, a fundamental problem in astrophysics. The initial conditions of the molecular cloud establish its dynamical history until the stellar cluster is born. However, the evolution of the cloud's angular momentum during cluster formation is not well understood. Current observations have suggested that turbulence scrambles the angular momentum of the cluster-forming cloud, preventing spin alignment amongst stars within a cluster. Here we use asteroseismology to measure the inclination angles of spin axes in 48 stars from the two old open clusters NGC~6791 and NGC~6819. The stars within each cluster show strong alignment. Three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of proto-cluster formation show that at least 50 % of the initial proto-cluster kinetic energy has to be rotational in order to obtain strong stellar-spin alignment within a cluster. Our result indicates that the global angular momentum of the cluster-forming clouds was efficiently transferred to each star and that its imprint has survived after several gigayears since the clusters formed.
  • CoRoT 223992193 is the only known low-mass, pre-main sequence eclipsing binary that shows evidence of a circumbinary disk. The system displays complex photometric and spectroscopic variability over a range of timescales and wavelengths. Using two optical CoRoT runs, and infrared Spitzer 3.6 and 4.5 $\mu$m observations (simultaneous with the second CoRoT run), we model the out-of-eclipse light curves. The large scale structure in both CoRoT light curves is consistent with the constructive and destructive interference of starspot signals at two slightly different periods. Using the stellar $v\sin i$ 's, we infer different rotation periods: the primary is consistent with synchronisation and the secondary is slightly supersynchronous. Comparison of the raw data to the residuals of our spot model in colour-magnitude space indicates additional contributions consistent with variable dust emission and obscuration. We also identify short-duration flux dips preceding secondary eclipse in all three CoRoT and Spitzer bands. We construct a model of the inner regions of the binary and propose that these dips could be caused by partial occultation of the central binary by the accretion stream onto the primary star. Analysis of 15 VLT/FLAMES H$\alpha$ profiles reveal an emission profile associated with each star: the majority is consistent with chromospheric emission but higher velocity emission is also seen, which could be due to prominences or accretion-related phenomena. In addition, simultaneous u and r-band observations from CFHT/MEGACam reveal a short-lived u-band excess consistent with either an accretion hot spot or stellar flare. The photometric and spectroscopic variations are complex but are consistent with the picture of two active stars possibly undergoing non-steady, low-level accretion; the system's very high inclination provides a new view of such variability. [Abridged]
  • We present the results of an optical photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy campaign for a modest sample of X-ray selected stars in the Chamaeleon and Rho Ophiuchus star forming regions. With R~50000 optical spectra, we establish kinematic membership of the parent association and confirm stellar youth for each star in our sample. With the acquisition of new standardized BVIc photometry, in concert with near-infrared data from the literature, we derive age and mass from stellar positions in model-dependent Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams. We compare isochronal ages derived using colour-dependent extinction values finding that, within error bars, ages are the same irrespective of whether E(B-V), E(V-Ic), E(J-H) or E(H-K) is used to establish extinction, although model ages tend to be marginally younger for redder Ecolour values. For Cham I and Eta Cham members we derive ages of ~< 5-6 Myr, whereas our three Eta Cha candidates are more consistent with a ~> 25 Myr post-T Tauri star population. In Rho Ophiuchus, most stars in our sample have isochronal ages <10 Myr. Five objects show evidence of strong infrared excess (Av>5) in the 2MASS colour colour diagram, however in terms of Halpha emission, all stars except RXJ1625.6-2613 are consistent with being weak-lined T-Tauri stars. Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) over the range ~ 4000A < wavelength < 1000 microns, show that only one Chamaeleon star (RXJ1112.7-7637) and three Rho Ophiuchus stars (ROXR1 13, RXJ1625.6-2613 & RXJ1627.1-2419) reveal substantial departures from a bare photosphere.
  • Our goal is to relate the photometric and spectroscopic variability of classical T Tauri stars, of the star-forming cluster NGC 2264, to the physical processes acting in the stellar and circumstellar environment, within a few stellar radii from the star. NGC 2264 was the target of a multiwavelength observational campaign with CoRoT, MOST, Spitzer, and Chandra satellites and observations from the ground. We classified the CoRoT light curves of accreting systems according to their morphology and compared our classification to several accretion diagnostics and disk parameters. The morphology of the CoRoT light curve reflects the evolution of the accretion process and of the inner disk region. Accretion burst stars present high mass-accretion rates and optically thick inner disks. AA Tau-like systems, whose light curves are dominated by circumstellar dust obscuration, show intermediate mass-accretion rates and are located in the transition of thick to anemic disks. Classical T Tauri stars with spot-like light curves correspond mostly to systems with a low mass-accretion rate and low mid-IR excess. About 30% of the classical T Tauri stars observed in the 2008 and 2011 CoRoT runs changed their light-curve morphology. Transitions from AA Tau-like and spot-like to aperiodic light curves and vice versa were common. The analysis of the $H\alpha$ emission line variability of 58 accreting stars showed that 8 presented a periodicity that in a few cases was coincident with the photometric period. The blue and red wings of the $H\alpha$ line profiles often do not correlate with each other, indicating that they are strongly influenced by different physical processes. Accreting stars have a dynamic stellar and circumstellar environment that can be explained by magnetospheric accretion and outflow models, including variations from stable to unstable accretion regimes on timescales of a few years
  • We provide CoRoT and Spitzer light curves, as well as broad-band multi-wavelength photometry and high resolution, multi- and single-epoch spectroscopy for 17 classical T Tauris in NGC 2264 whose CoRoT light curves (LCs) exemplify the "stochastic" LC class as defined in Cody et al. (2014). The most probable physical mechanism to explain the optical variability in this LC class is time-dependent mass accretion onto the stellar photosphere, producing transient hot spots. As evidence in favor of this hypothesis, multi-epoch high resolution spectra for a subset of these stars shows that their veiling levels also vary in time and that this veiling variability is consistent in both amplitude and timescale with the optical LC morphology. Furthermore, the veiling variability is well-correlated with the strength of the HeI 6678A emission line, a feature predicted by models to arise in accretion shocks on or near the stellar photosphere. Stars with accretion burst LC morphology (Stauffer et al. 2014) are also attributed to variable mass accretion. Both the stochastic and accretion burst LCs can be explained by a simple model of randomly occurring flux bursts, with the stochastic LC class having a higher frequency of lower amplitude events. Based on their UV excesses, veiling, and mean Ha equivalent widths, members of the stochastic LC class have only moderate time-averaged mass accretion rates. The most common feature of their Ha profiles is for them to exhibit blue-shifted absorption features, most likely originating in a disk wind. The lack of periodic signatures in the LCs suggests that little of the variability is due to long-lived hot spots rotating into or out of our line of sight; instead, the primary driver of the observed photometric variability is likely to be instabilities in the inner disk that lead to variable mass accretion.
  • We study the predicted rotational evolution of solar-type stars from the pre-main sequence to the solar age with 1D rotating evolutionary models including physical ingredients. We computed rotating evolution models of solar-type stars including an external stellar wind torque and internal transport of angular momentum following the method of Maeder and Zahn with the code STAREVOL. We explored different formalisms and prescriptions available from the literature. We tested the predictions of the models against recent rotational period data from extensive photometric surveys, lithium abundances of solar-mass stars in young clusters, and the helioseismic rotation profile of the Sun. We find a best-matching combination of prescriptions for both internal transport and surface extraction of angular momentum. This combination provides a very good fit to the observed evolution of rotational periods for solar-type stars from early evolution to the age of the Sun. Additionally, we show that fast rotators experience a stronger coupling between their radiative region and the convective envelope. Regardless of the set of prescriptions, however, we cannot simultaneously reproduce surface angular velocity and the internal profile of the Sun or the evolution of lithium abundance. We confirm the idea that additional transport mechanisms must occur in solar-type stars until they reach the age of the Sun. Whether these processes are the same as those needed to explain recent asteroseismic data in more advanced evolutionary phases is still an open question.
  • We calculate the flux received from a binary system obscured by a circumbinary disc. The disc is modelled using two dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, and the vertical structure is derived by assuming it is isothermal. The gravitational torque from the binary creates a cavity in the disc's inner parts. If the line of sight along which the system is observed has a high inclination $I$, it intersects the disc and some absorption is produced. As the system is not axisymmetric, the resulting light curve displays variability. We calculate the absorption and produce light curves for different values of the dust disc aspect ratio $H/r$ and mass of dust in the cavity $M_{\rm dust}$. This model is applied to the high inclination ($I=85^{\circ}$) eclipsing binary CoRoT 223992193, which shows 5-10% residual photometric variability after the eclipses and a spot model are subtracted. We find that such variations for $I \sim 85^{\circ}$ can be obtained for $H/r=10^{-3}$ and $M_{\rm dust} \ge 10^{-12}$ M$_{\odot}$. For higher $H/r$, $M_{\rm dust}$ would have to be close to this lower value and $I$ somewhat less than $85^{\circ}$. Our results show that such variability in a system where the stars are at least 90% visible at all phases can be obtained only if absorption is produced by dust located inside the cavity. If absorption is dominated by the parts of the disc located close to or beyond the edge of the cavity, the stars are significantly obscured.
  • Observations of surface magnetic fields are now within reach for many stellar types thanks to the development of Zeeman-Doppler Imaging. These observations are extremely useful for constraining rotational evolution models of stars, as well as for characterizing the generation of magnetic field. We recently demonstrated that the impact of coronal magnetic field topology on the rotational braking of a star can be parametrized with a scalar parameter: the open magnetic flux. However, without running costly numerical simulations of the stellar wind, reconstructing the coronal structure of the large scale magnetic field is not trivial. An alternative -broadly used in solar physics- is to extrapolate the surface magnetic field assuming a potential field in the corona, to describe the opening of the field lines by the magnetized wind. This technique relies on the definition of a so-called source surface radius, which is often fixed to the canonical value of 2.5Rsun. However this value likely varies from star to star. To resolve this issue, we use our extended set of 2.5D wind simulations published in 2015, to provide a criteria for the opening of field lines as well as a simple tool to assess the source surface radius and the open magnetic flux. This allows us to derive the magnetic torque applied to the star by the wind from any spectropolarimetric observation. We conclude by discussing some estimations of spin-down time scales made using our technique, and compare them to observational requirements.
  • We explore UV and optical variability signatures for several hundred members of NGC 2264 (3 Myr). We performed simultaneous u- and r-band monitoring over two full weeks with CFHT/MegaCam. About 750 young stars are probed; 40% of them are accreting. Statistically distinct variability properties are observed for accreting and non-accreting cluster members. The accretors exhibit a significantly higher level of variability than the non-accretors, especially in the UV. The amount of u-band variability correlates statistically with UV excess in disk-bearing objects, which suggests that accretion and star-disk interaction are the main sources of variability. Cool magnetic spots, several hundred degrees colder than the photosphere and covering from 5 to 30% of the stellar surface, appear to be the leading factor of variability for the non-accreting stars. In contrast, accretion spots, a few thousand degrees hotter than the photosphere and covering a few percent of the stellar surface, best reproduce the variability of accreting objects. The color behavior is also found to be different between accreting and non-accreting stars. Typical variability amplitudes for accreting members rapidly increase from r to u, which indicates a much stronger contrast at short wavelengths; a lower color dependence in the amplitudes is instead measured for diskless stars. We find that u-band variability on hour timescales is typically about 10% of the peak-to-peak variability on day timescales, while longer term (years) variability is consistent with amplitudes measured over weeks. We conclude that for both accreting and non-accreting stars, the mid-term rotational modulation by spots is the leading timescale for a variability of up to several years. In turn, this suggests that the accretion process is essentially stable over years, although it exhibits low-level shorter term variations in single accretion events.
  • The classical T Tauri star AA Tau presented photometric variability attributed to an inner disk warp, caused by the interaction between the inner disk and an inclined magnetosphere. Previous studies of NGC 2264 have shown that similar photometric behavior is common among CTTS. The goal of this work is to investigate the main causes of the observed photometric variability of CTTS in NGC 2264 that present AA Tau-like light curves, and verify if an inner disk warp could be responsible for their variability. We investigate veiling variability in their spectra and u-r color variations and estimate parameters of the inner disk warp using an occultation model proposed for AA Tau. We compare infrared and optical light curves to analyze the dust responsible for the occultations. AA Tau-like variability is transient on a timescale of a few years. We ascribe it to stable accretion regimes and aperiodic variability to unstable accretion regimes and show that a transition, and even coexistence, between the two is common. We find evidence of hot spots associated with occultations, indicating that the occulting structures could be located at the base of accretion columns. We find average values of warp maximum height of 0.23 times its radial location, consistent with AA Tau, with variations of on average 11% between rotation cycles. We show that extinction laws in the inner disk indicate the presence of grains larger than interstellar grains. The inner disk warp scenario is consistent with observations for all but one periodic star in our sample. AA Tau-like systems comprise 14% of CTTS observed in NGC 2264, though this increases to 35% among systems of mass 0.7M_sun<M<2.0M_sun. Assuming random inclinations, we estimate that nearly all systems in this mass range likely possess an inner disk warp, possibly because of a change in magnetic field configurations among stars of lower mass.
  • We developed angular momentum evolution models for 0.5 and 0.8 $M_{\odot}$ stars. The parametric models include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetised stellar winds, specific dynamo and mass-loss rate prescriptions, as well as core/envelope decoupling. We compare model predictions to the distributions of rotational periods measured for low mass stars belonging to star forming regions and young open clusters. Furthermore, we explore the mass dependence of model parameters by comparing these new models to the solar-mass models we developed earlier. Rotational evolution models are computed for slow, median, and fast rotators at each stellar mass. The models reproduce reasonably well the rotational behaviour of low-mass stars between 1 Myr and 8-10 Gyr, including pre-main sequence to zero-age main sequence spin up, prompt zero-age main sequence spin down, and early-main sequence convergence of the surface rotation rates. Fast rotators are found to have systematically shorter disk lifetimes than moderate and slow rotators, thus enabling dramatic pre-main sequence spin up. They also have shorter core-envelope coupling timescales, i.e., more uniform internal rotation. As to the mass dependence, lower mass stars require significantly longer core-envelope coupling timescale than solar-type ones, which results in strong differential rotation developing in the stellar interior on the early main sequence. Lower mass stars also require a weaker braking torque to account for their longer spin down timescale on the early main sequence, while they ultimately converge towards lower rotational velocities than solar-type stars on the longer term due to their reduced moment of inertia. We also find evidence that the mass-dependence of the wind braking efficiency may be related to a change of the magnetic topology in lower mass stars.
  • We identify nine young stellar objects (YSOs) in the NGC 2264 star-forming region with optical {\em CoRoT} light curves exhibiting short-duration, shallow, periodic flux dips. All of these stars have infrared (IR) excesses that are consistent with their having inner disk walls near the Keplerian co-rotation radius. The repeating photometric dips have FWHM generally less than one day, depths almost always less than 15%, and periods (3<P<11 days) consistent with dust near the Keplerian co-rotation period. The flux dips vary considerably in their depth from epoch to epoch, but usually persist for several weeks and, in two cases, were present in data collected on successive years. For several of these stars, we also measure the photospheric rotation period and find that the rotation and dip periods are the same, as predicted by standard "disk-locking" models. We attribute these flux dips to clumps of material in or near the inner disk wall, passing through our line of sight to the stellar photosphere. In some cases, these dips are also present in simultaneous {\em Spitzer} IRAC light curves at 3.6 and 4.5 microns. We characterize the properties of these dips, and compare the stars with light curves exhibiting this behavior to other classes of YSO in NGC 2264. A number of physical mechanisms could locally increase the dust scale height near the inner disk wall, and we discuss several of those mechanisms; the most plausible mechanisms are either a disk warp due to interaction with the stellar magnetic field or dust entrained in funnel-flow accretion columns arising near the inner disk wall.
  • We aim at characterizing the accretion properties of several hundred members of the star-forming cluster NGC 2264 (3 Myr). We performed a deep u,g,r,i mapping and a simultaneous u+r monitoring of the region with CFHT/MegaCam in order to directly probe the accretion process from UV excess measurements. Photometric properties and stellar parameters are determined homogeneously for about 750 monitored young objects, spanning the mass range 0.1-2 Mo. About 40% are classical (accreting) T Tauri stars, based on various diagnostics (H_alpha, UV and IR excesses). The remaining non-accreting members define the (photospheric+chromospheric) reference UV emission level over which flux excess is detected and measured. We revise the membership status of cluster members based on UV accretion signatures and report a new population of 50 CTTS candidates. A large range of UV excess is measured for the CTTS population, varying from a few 0.1 to 3 mag. We convert these values to accretion luminosities and obtain mass accretion rates ranging from 1e-10 to 1e-7 Mo/yr. Taking into account a mass-dependent detection threshold for weakly accreting objects, we find a >6sigma correlation between mass accretion rate and stellar mass. A power-law fit, properly accounting for upper limits, yields M_acc $\propto$ M^{1.4+/-0.3}. At any given stellar mass, we find a large spread of accretion rates, extending over about 2 orders of magnitude. The monitoring of the UV excess on a timescale of a couple of weeks indicates that its variability typically amounts to 0.5 dex, much smaller than the observed spread. We suggest that a non-negligible age spread across the cluster may effectively contribute to the observed spread in accretion rates at a given mass. In addition, different accretion mechanisms (like, e.g., short-lived accretion bursts vs. more stable funnel-flow accretion) may be associated to different M_acc regimes.
  • We present the Coordinated Synoptic Investigation of NGC 2264, a continuous 30-day multi-wavelength photometric monitoring campaign on more than 1000 young cluster members using 16 telescopes. The unprecedented combination of multi-wavelength, high-precision, high-cadence, and long-duration data opens a new window into the time domain behavior of young stellar objects. Here we provide an overview of the observations, focusing on results from Spitzer and CoRoT. The highlight of this work is detailed analysis of 162 classical T Tauri stars for which we can probe optical and mid-infrared flux variations to 1% amplitudes and sub-hour timescales. We present a morphological variability census and then use metrics of periodicity, stochasticity, and symmetry to statistically separate the light curves into seven distinct classes, which we suggest represent different physical processes and geometric effects. We provide distributions of the characteristic timescales and amplitudes, and assess the fractional representation within each class. The largest category (>20%) are optical "dippers" having discrete fading events lasting ~1-5 days. The degree of correlation between the optical and infrared light curves is positive but weak; notably, the independently assigned optical and infrared morphology classes tend to be different for the same object. Assessment of flux variation behavior with respect to (circum)stellar properties reveals correlations of variability parameters with H$\alpha$ emission and with effective temperature. Overall, our results point to multiple origins of young star variability, including circumstellar obscuration events, hot spots on the star and/or disk, accretion bursts, and rapid structural changes in the inner disk.
  • Based on more than four weeks of continuous high cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects (YSOs) whose optical variability is dominated by short duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief -- several hour to one day -- brightenings at optical and near-infrared (IR) wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range 5-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a thirty day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u-g vs. g-r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Halpha equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Halpha emission profiles or profiles with blue-shifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Amongst the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Halpha equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.
  • We present the discovery of CoRoT 223992193, a double-lined, detached eclipsing binary, comprising two pre-main sequence M dwarfs, discovered by the CoRoT space mission during a 23-day observation of the 3 Myr old NGC 2264 star-forming region. Using multi-epoch optical and near-IR follow-up spectroscopy with FLAMES on the Very Large Telescope and ISIS on the William Herschel Telescope we obtain a full orbital solution and derive the fundamental parameters of both stars by modelling the light curve and radial velocity data. The orbit is circular and has a period of $3.8745745 \pm 0.0000014$ days. The masses and radii of the two stars are $0.67 \pm 0.01$ and $0.495 \pm 0.007$ $M_{\odot}$ and $1.30 \pm 0.04$ and $1.11 ~^{+0.04}_{-0.05}$ $R_{\odot}$, respectively. This system is a useful test of evolutionary models of young low-mass stars, as it lies in a region of parameter space where observational constraints are scarce; comparison with these models indicates an apparent age of $\sim$3.5-6 Myr. The systemic velocity is within $1\sigma$ of the cluster value which, along with the presence of lithium absorption, strongly indicates cluster membership. The CoRoT light curve also contains large-amplitude, rapidly evolving out-of-eclipse variations, which are difficult to explain using starspots alone. The system's spectral energy distribution reveals a mid-infrared excess, which we model as thermal emission from a small amount of dust located in the inner cavity of a circumbinary disk. In turn, this opens up the possibility that some of the out-of-eclipse variability could be due to occultations of the central stars by material located at the inner edge or in the central cavity of the circumbinary disk.
  • We present new models for the rotational evolution of solar-like stars between 1 Myr and 10 Gyr with the aim to reproduce the distributions of rotational periods observed for star forming regions and young open clusters within this age range. The models include a new wind braking law based on recent numerical simulations of magnetized stellar winds and specific dynamo and mass-loss prescriptions are adopted to tie angular momentum loss to angular velocity. The model additionally assume constant angular velocity during the disk accretion phase and allow for decoupling between the radiative core and the convective envelope as soon as the former develops. We have developed rotational evolution models for slow, median and fast rotators with initial periods of 10, 7, and 1.4d, respectively. The models reproduce reasonably well the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars between 1 Myr and 4.5 Gyr, including PMS to ZAMS spin up, prompt ZAMS spin down, and the early-MS convergence of surface rotation rates. We find the model parameters accounting for the slow and median rotators are very similar to each other, with a disk lifetime of 5 Myr and a core-envelope coupling timescale of 28-30 Myr. In contrast, fast rotators have both shorter disk lifetime (2.5 Myr) and core-envelope coupling timescale (12 Myr). We emphasize that these results are highly dependent on the adopted braking law. We also report a tentative correlation between initial rotational period and disk lifetime, which suggests that protostellar spin-down by massive disks in the embedded phase is at the origin of the initial dispersion of rotation rates in young stars. We conclude that this class of semi-empirical models successfully grasp the main trends of the rotational behaviour of solar-type stars as they evolve and make specific predictions that may serve as a guide for further development.
  • AA Tau has been monitored for more than 20 years since 1987, exhibiting a nearly constant brightness level of V=12.5 mag. We report here that in 2011 it suddenly faded away, becoming 2 magnitudes fainter in the V-band, and has remained in this deep state since then. We report new optical and near-IR photometry and spectroscopy obtained during the fading event. The system appears much redder and fainter than it was in the bright state. Also, the 8.2d photometric period continuously observed for more than 20 years is not seen during most of the deep state. The analysis of the system's brightness and colors suggests that the visual extinction on the line of sight has increased by about 3-4 magnitudes in the deep state. At optical wavelengths, the system appears to be dominated by scattered light, probably originating from the upper surface layers of a highly inclined circumstellar disk. The profiles of the Balmer lines have significantly changed as well, with the disappearance of a central absorption component regularly observed in the bright state. We ascribe this change to the scattering of the system's spectrum by circumstellar dust. Noticeably, the mass accretion rate in the inner disk and onto the central star has not changed as the system faded away. We conclude that the deepening of the AA Tau system is due to a sudden increase of circumstellar dust extinction on the line of sight without concomitant change in the accretion rate. We suggest that the enhanced obscuration may be produced by a non-axisymmetric overdense region in the disk, located at a distance of 7.7 AU or more, that was recently brought on the line of sight by its keplerian motion around the central star.
  • Rotation is one of the key stellar parameters which undergo substantial evolution during the stellar lifetime, in particular during the early stages. Stellar rotational periods can be determined on the basis of the periodic modulation of starlight produced by non-uniformities on the surface of the stars, due to manifestation of stellar activity. We present the results of an extensive search for rotational periods among NGC 2264 cluster members, based on photometric monitoring using the CoRoT satellite, with a particular attention to the distribution of classical and weak-line T-Tauri stars. NGC 2264 is one of the nearest and best studied star forming region in the solar neighbourhood, with an estimated age of 3 Myr, and is the object of a recent simultaneous multiband campaign including a new CoRoT observation with the aim to assess the physical origin of the observed variability. We find that the rotational distributions of classical and weak-line T-Tauri star are different, suggesting a difference in the rotational properties of accreting and non-accreting stars.
  • FU Orionis systems are young stars undergoing outbursts of disc accretion and where the optical spectrum contains lines associated with both the disc photosphere and a wind component. Previous observations of the prototype FU Orionis have suggested that the wind lines and the photospheric lines are modulated with periods of 14.54 and 3.54 days respectively (Herbig et al. 2003). We have re-observed the system at higher spectral resolution, by monitoring variations of optical line profiles over 21 nights in 2007 and have found periods of 13.48 and 3.6 days in the wind and disc components consistent with the above: this implies variability mechanisms that are stable over at least a decade. In addition we have found: i) that the variations in the photospheric absorption lines are confined to the blue wing of the line (around -9km/s): we tentatively ascribe this to an orbiting hotspot in the disc which is obscured by a disc warp during its receding phase. ii) The wind period is manifested not only in blue-shifted Halpha absorption, but also in red-shifted emission of Halpha and Hbeta, as well as in blue-shifted absorption of Na I D, Li I and Fe II. iii) We find that the periodic modulation of blue-shifted Halpha absorption at around -100km/s, is phase lagged with respect to variations in the other lines by ~1.8days. This is consistent with a picture in which variations at the wind base first affect chromospheric emission and then low velocity blue-shifted absorption, followed - after a lag equal to the propagation time of disturbances across the wind's acceleration region - by a response in high velocity blue-shifted absorption. Such arguments constrain the size of the acceleration region to ~10^12cm. We discuss possible mechanisms for periodic variations within the innermost 0.1AU of the disc, including the possibility that these variations indicate the presence of an embedded hot Jupiter.
  • We investigate the rotation periods of fully convective very low mass stars (VLM, M<0.3 Msol), with the aim to derive empirical constraints for the spindown due to magnetically driven stellar winds. Our analysis is based on a new sample of rotation periods in the main-sequence cluster Praesepe (age 600 Myr). From photometric lightcurves obtained with the Isaac Newton Telescope, we measure rotation periods for 49 objects, among them 26 in the VLM domain. This enlarges the period sample in this mass and age regime by a factor of 6. Almost all VLM objects in our sample are fast rotators with periods <2.5 d, in contrast to the stars with M>0.6 Msol in this cluster which have periods of 7-14 d. Thus, we confirm that the period-mass distribution in Praesepe exhibits a radical break at M~0.3-0.6 Msol. Our data indicate a positive period-mass trend in the VLM regime, similar to younger clusters. In addition, the scatter of the periods increases with mass. For the M>0.3 Msol objects in our sample the period distribution is probably affected by binarity. By comparing the Praesepe periods with literature samples in the cluster NGC2516 (age ~150 Myr) we constrain the spindown in the VLM regime. An exponential rotational braking law P ~ exp(t/tau) with a mass-dependent tau is required to reproduce the data. The spindown timescale tau increases steeply towards lower masses; we derive tau~0.5 Gyr for 0.3 Msol and >1 Gyr for 0.1 Msol. These constraints are consistent with the current paradigm of the spindown due to wind braking. We discuss possible physical origins of this behaviour and prospects for future work.
  • The Z CMa binary is understood to undergo both FU Orionis (FUOR) and EX Orionis (EXOR) type outbursts. While the SE component has been spectro- scopically identified as an FUOR, the NW component, a Herbig Be star, is the source of the EXOR outbursts. The system has been identified as the source of a large outflow, however, previous studies have failed to identify the driver. Here we present adaptive optics (AO) assisted [FeII] spectro-images which reveal for the first time the presence of two jets. Observations made using OSIRIS at the Keck Observatory show the Herbig Be star to be the source of the parsec-scale outflow, which within 2'' of the source shows signs of wiggling and the FUOR to '' be driving a ~ 0.4 jet. The wiggling of the Herbig Be star's jet is evidence for an additional companion which could in fact be generating the EXOR outbursts, the last of which began in 2008 (Grankin & Artemenko 2009). Indeed the dy- namical scale of the wiggling corresponds to a time-scale of 4-8 years which is in agreement with the time-scale of these outbursts. The spectro-images also show a bow-shock shaped feature and possible associated knots. The origin of this structure is as of yet unclear. Finally interesting low velocity structure is also observed. One possibility is that it originates in a wide-angle outflow launched from a circumbinary disk.
  • Z CMa is a young binary system consisting of an Herbig primary and a FU Ori companion. Both components seem to be surrounded by active accretion disks and a jet was associated to the Herbig B0. In Nov. 2008, K. Grankin discovered that Z CMa was exhibiting an outburst with an amplitude larger than any photometric variations recorded in the last 25 years. To study the innermost regions in which the outburst occurs and understand its origin, we have observed both binary components with AMBER/VLTI across the Br{\gamma} emission line in Dec. 2009 in medium and high spectral resolution modes. Our observations show that the Herbig Be, responsible for the increase of luminosity, also produces a strong Br{\gamma} emission, and they allow us to disentangle from various origins by locating the emission at each velocities through the line. Considering a model of a Keplerian disk alone fails at reproducing the asymmetric spectro-astrometric measurements, suggesting a major contribution from an outflow.
  • We present results from the earliest observations of DEBRIS, a Herschel Key Programme to conduct a volume- and flux-limited survey for debris discs in A-type through M-type stars. PACS images (from chop/nod or scan-mode observations) at 100 and 160 micron are presented toward two A-type stars and one F-type star: beta Leo, beta UMa and eta Corvi. All three stars are known disc hosts. Herschel spatially resolves the dust emission around all three stars (marginally, in the case of beta UMa), providing new information about discs as close as 11 pc with sizes comparable to that of the Solar System. We have combined these data with existing flux density measurements of the discs to refine the SEDs and derive estimates of the fractional luminosities, temperatures and radii of the discs.