• The Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies (SWAN) studies atomic and molecular species across the nuclei of four star forming galaxies: NGC\,253, IC\,342, NGC\,6946, and NGC\,2146. As part of this survey, we present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) molecular line observations of three galaxies: IC\,342, NGC\,6946 and NGC\,2146. NGC\,253 is covered in a previous paper. These galaxies were chosen to span an order of magnitude in star formation rates and to select a variety of galaxy types. We target the metastable transitions of ammonia NH$_{3}$(1,1) to (5,5), the 22\,GHz water (H$_2$O) ($6_{16}-5_{23}$) transition, and the 36.1\,GHz methanol (CH$_3$OH) ($4_{-1}-3_{0}$) transition. {We use the NH$_{3}$\ metastable lines to perform thermometry of the dense molecular gas.} We show evidence for uniform heating across the central kpc of IC\,342 with two temperature components for the molecular gas, similar to NGC 253,} of 27\,K and 308\,K, and that the dense molecular gas in NGC\,2146 has a temperature $<$86 K. We identify two new water masers in IC\,342, and one new water maser in each of NGC\,6946 and NGC\,2146. The two galaxies NGC\,253 and NGC\,2146, with the most vigorous star formation, host H$_2$O kilomasers. Lastly, we detect the first 36\,GHz CH$_3$OH\ masers in IC\,342 and NGC\,6946. For the four external galaxies the total CH$_3$OH\ luminosity in each galaxy suggests a correlation with galactic star formation rate, whereas the morphology of the emission is similar to that of HNCO, a weak shock tracer.
  • Centaurus A, with its gas-rich elliptical host galaxy, NGC 5128, is the nearest radio galaxy at a distance of 3.8 Mpc. Its proximity allows us to study the interaction between an active galactic nucleus, radio jets, and molecular gas in great detail. We present ALMA observations of low J transitions of three CO isotopologues, HCN, HCO$^{+}$, HNC, CN, and CCH toward the inner projected 500 pc of NGC 5128. Our observations resolve physical sizes down to 40 pc. By observing multiple chemical probes, we determine the physical and chemical conditions of the nuclear interstellar medium of NGC 5128. This region contains molecular arms associated with the dust lanes and a circumnuclear disk (CND) interior to the molecular arms. The CND is approximately 400 pc by 200 pc and appears to be chemically distinct from the molecular arms. It is dominated by dense gas tracers while the molecular arms are dominated by $^{12}$CO and its rare isotopologues. The CND has a higher temperature, elevated CN/HCN and HCN/HNC intensity ratios, and much weaker $^{13}$CO and C$^{18}$O emission than the molecular arms. This suggests an influence from the AGN on the CND molecular gas. There is also absorption against the AGN with a low velocity complex near the systemic velocity and a high velocity complex shifted by about 60 km s$^{-1}$. We find similar chemical properties between the CND in emission and both the low and high velocity absorption complexes implying that both likely originate from the CND. If the HV complex does originate in the CND, then that gas would correspond to gas falling toward the supermassive black hole.
  • The Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center (SWAG) covers the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way at frequencies between 21.2 and 25.4 GHz obtained at the Australia Telescope Compact Array at $\sim 0.9$ pc spatial and $\sim 2.0$ km s$^{-1}$ spectral resolution. In this paper, we present data on the inner $\sim 250$ pc ($1.4^\circ$) between Sgr C and Sgr B2. We focus on the hyperfine structure of the metastable ammonia inversion lines (J,K) = (1,1) - (6,6) to derive column density, kinematics, opacity and kinetic gas temperature. In the CMZ molecular clouds, we find typical line widths of $8-16$ km s$^{-1}$ and extended regions of optically thick ($\tau > 1$) emission. Two components in kinetic temperature are detected at $25-50$ K and $60-100$ K, both being significantly hotter than dust temperatures throughout the CMZ. We discuss the physical state of the CMZ gas as traced by ammonia in the context of the orbital model by Kruijssen et al. (2015) that interprets the observed distribution as a stream of molecular clouds following an open eccentric orbit. This allows us to statistically investigate the time dependencies of gas temperature, column density and line width. We find heating rates between $\sim 50$ and $\sim 100$ K Myr$^{-1}$ along the stream orbit. No strong signs of time dependence are found for column density or line width. These quantities are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations. Our results qualitatively match the predictions of the current model of tidal triggering of cloud collapse, orbital kinematics and the observation of an evolutionary sequence of increasing star formation activity with orbital phase.
  • We present Karl G Jansky Very Large Array molecular line observations of the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253, from SWAN: "Survey of Water and Ammonia in Nearby galaxies". SWAN is a molecular line survey at centimeter wavelengths designed to reveal the physical conditions of star forming gas over a range of star forming galaxies. NGC 253 has been observed in four 1GHz bands from 21 to 36 GHz at 6" ($\sim100$pc) spatial and 3.5 km s$^{-1}$ spectral resolution. In total we detect 19 transitions from seven molecular and atomic species. We have targeted the metastable inversion transitions of ammonia (NH$_{3}$) from (1,1) to (5,5) and the (9,9) line, the 22.2 GHz water (H$_2$O) ($6_{16}-5_{23}$) maser, and the 36.1 GHz methanol (CH$_3$OH) ($4_{-1}-3_{0}$) maser. Utilizing NH$_{3}$ as a thermometer, we present evidence for uniform heating over the central kpc of NGC 253. The molecular gas is best described by a two kinetic temperature model with a warm 130K and a cooler 57K component. A comparison of these observations with previous ALMA results suggests that the molecular gas is not heated in photon dominated regions or shocks. It is possible that the gas is heated by turbulence or cosmic rays. In the galaxy center we find evidence for NH$_{3}$(3,3) masers. Furthermore we present velocities and luminosities of three water maser features related to the nuclear starburst. We partially resolve CH$_3$OH masers seen at the edges of the bright molecular emission, which coincides with expanding molecular superbubbles. This suggests that the masers are pumped by weak shocks in the bubble surfaces.
  • SWAG ("Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center") is a multi-line interferometric survey toward the Center of the Milky Way conducted with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The survey region spans the entire ~400pc Central Molecular Zone and comprises ~42 spectral lines at pc spatial and sub-km/s spectral resolution. In addition, we deeply map continuum intensity, spectral index, and polarization at the frequencies where synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust sources emit. The observed spectral lines include many transitions of ammonia, which we use to construct maps of molecular gas temperature, opacity and gas formation temperature (see poster by Nico Krieger et al., this volume). Water masers pinpoint the sites of active star formation and other lines are good tracers for density, radiation field, shocks, and ionization. This extremely rich survey forms a perfect basis to construct maps of the physical parameters of the gas in this extreme environment.
  • We infer the absolute time dependence of kinematic gas temperature along a proposed orbit of molecular clouds in the Central Molecular Zone (CMZ) of the Galactic Center (GC). Ammonia gas temperature maps are one of the results of the "Survey of Water and Ammonia in the Galactic Center" (SWAG, PI: J. Ott); the dynamical model of molecular clouds in the CMZ was taken from Kruijssen et al. (2015). We find that gas temperatures increase as a function of time in both regimes before and after the cloud passes pericenter on its orbit in the GC potential. This is consistent with the recent proposal that pericenter passage triggers gravitational collapse. Other investigated quantities (line width, column density, opacity) show no strong sign of time dependence but are likely dominated by cloud-to-cloud variations.
  • We present ALMA observations of the inner 1' (1.2 kpc) of the Circinus galaxy, the nearest Seyfert. We target CO (1-0) in the region associated with a well-known multiphase outflow driven by the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). While the geometry of Circinus and its outflow make disentangling the latter difficult, we see indications of outflowing molecular gas at velocities consistent with the ionized outflow. We constrain the mass of the outflowing molecular gas to be 1.5e5 -5.1e6 solar masses, yielding a molecular outflow rate of 0.35-12.3 solar masses per year. The values within this range are comparable to the star formation rate in Circinus, indicating that the outflow indeed regulates star formation to some degree. The molecular outflow in Circinus is considerably lower in mass and energetics than previously-studied AGN-driven outflows, especially given its high ratio of AGN luminosity to bolometric luminosity. The molecular outflow in Circinus is, however, consistent with some trends put forth in Cicone et al. (2014), including a linear relation between kinetic power and AGN luminosity, as well as its momentum rate vs. bolometric luminosity (although the latter places Circinus among the starburst galaxies in that sample). We detect additional molecular species including CN and C17O.
  • We observe Arp 220, the nearest Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxy (ULIRG), over 4 GHz in the K and Ka bands. We provide constraints for the kinematics,morphology, and identify molecular species on scales resolving both nuclei (0.6" or 230 pc). We detect multiple molecular species, including hydroxyl in both cores. We tentatively detect H2O at 21.84 GHz in both nuclei, indicating the likely presence of maser emission. The observed frequency range also contains metastable ammonia transitions from (J,K) = (1,1) to (5,5), as well as the (9,9) inversion line, which, together are a well-known thermometer of dense molecular gas. Furthermore, the non-metastable (4,2) and (10,9) and possibly the (3,1) lines are also detected. We apply a standard temperature analysis to Arp 220. However, the analysis is complicated in that standard LTE assumptions do not hold. There are indications that a substantial fraction of ammonia could be in the non-metastable transitions as opposed to only the metastable ones. Thus, the non-metastable transitions could be essential to constraining the temperature. We compare all of these data to ALMA observations of this source, confirming the outflow previously observed by other tracers in both nuclei.
  • We analyze the relationships between atomic, neutral hydrogen (HI) and star formation (SF) in the 12 low-mass SHIELD galaxies. We compare high spectral (~0.82 km/s/channel) and spatial resolution (physical resolutions of 170 pc - 700 pc) HI imaging from the VLA with H\alpha and far-ultraviolet imaging. We quantify the degree of co-spatiality between star forming regions and regions of high HI column densities. We calculate the global star formation efficiencies (SFE, $\Sigma_{\rm SFR}$ / $\Sigma_{\rm HI}$), and examine the relationships among the SFE and HI mass, HI column density, and star formation rate (SFR). The systems are consuming their cold neutral gas on timescales of order a few Gyr. While we derive an index for the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation of N ~ 0.68 $\pm$ 0.04 for the SHIELD sample as a whole, the values of N vary considerably from system to system. By supplementing SHIELD results with those from other surveys, we find that HI mass and UV-based SFR are strongly correlated over five orders of magnitude. Identification of patterns within the SHIELD sample allows us to bin the galaxies into three general categories: 1) mainly co-spatial HI and SF regions, found in systems with highest peak HI column densities and highest total HI masses, 2) moderately correlated HI and SF regions, found in systems with moderate HI column densities, and 3) obvious offsets between HI and SF peaks, found in systems with the lowest total HI masses. SF in these galaxies is dominated by stochasticity and random fluctuations in their ISM.
  • We present kinematic analyses of the 12 galaxies in the "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD). We use multi-configuration interferometric observations of the HI 21cm emission line from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to produce image cubes at a variety of spatial and spectral resolutions. Both two- and three-dimensional fitting techniques are employed in an attempt to derive inclination-corrected rotation curves for each galaxy. In most cases, the comparable magnitudes of velocity dispersion and projected rotation result in degeneracies that prohibit unambiguous circular velocity solutions. We thus make spatially resolved position-velocity cuts, corrected for inclination using the stellar components, to estimate the circular rotation velocities. We find circular velocities <30 km/s for the entire survey population. Baryonic masses are calculated using single-dish HI fluxes from Arecibo and stellar masses derived from HST and Spitzer imaging. Comparison is made with total dynamical masses estimated from the position-velocity analysis. The SHIELD galaxies are then placed on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. There exists an empirical threshold rotational velocity <15 km/s, below which current observations cannot differentiate coherent rotation from pressure support. The SHIELD galaxies are representative of an important population of galaxies whose properties cannot be described by current models of rotationally-dominated galaxy dynamics.
  • Observations suggest that there is a significant fraction of O-stars in the field of the Milky Way that appear to have formed in isolation or in low mass clusters ($<$100 $M_\odot$). The existence of these high-mass stars that apparently formed in the field challenges the generally accepted paradigm, which requires star formation to occur in clustered environments. In order to understand the physical conditions for the formation of these stars, it is necessary to observe isolated high-mass stars while they are still forming. With the $Hubble$ $Space$ $Telescope$, we observe the seven most isolated massive ($>$8 $M_\odot$) young stellar objects (MYSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The observations show that while these MYSOs are remote from other MYSOs, OB associations, and even from known giant molecular clouds, they are actually not isolated at all. Imaging reveals $\sim$100 to several hundred pre--main-sequence (PMS) stars in the vicinity of each MYSO. These previously undetected PMS stars form prominent compact clusters around the MYSOs, and in most cases they are also distributed sparsely across the observed regions. Contrary to what previous high-mass field star studies show, these observations suggest that high-mass stars may not be able to form in clusters with masses less than 100 $M_\odot$. If these MYSOs are indeed the best candidates for isolated high-mass star formation, then the lack of isolation is at odds with random sampling of the IMF. Moreover, while isolated MYSOs may not exist, we find evidence that isolated clusters containing O-stars can exist, which in itself is rare.
  • We report linearly polarized continuum emission properties of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz, based on the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations. We used the observations of the likely unpolarized continuum emission of Titan, and the observations of C\textsc{i} line emission, to gauge the degree of spurious polarization. The Stokes I flux of 3.6$\pm$0.72 Jy during our run is consistent with extrapolations from the previous, lower frequency observations. We found that the continuum emission of Sgr A* at $\sim$492 GHz shows large amplitude differences between the XX and the YY correlations. The observed intensity ratio between the XX and YY correlations as a function of parallactic angle may be explained by a constant polarization position angle of $\sim$158$^{\circ}$$\pm$3$^{\circ}$. The fitted polarization percentage of Sgr A* during our observational period is 14\%$\pm$1.2\%. The calibrator quasar J1744-3116 we observed at the same night can be fitted to Stokes I = 252 mJy, with 7.9\%$\pm$0.9\% polarization in position angle P.A. = 4.1$^{\circ}$$\pm$4.2$^{\circ}$. The observed polarization percentage and polarization position angle in the present work appear consistent with those expected from longer wavelength observations in the period of 1999-2005. In particular, the polarization position angle at 492 GHz, expected from the previously fitted 167$^{\circ}$$\pm$7$^{\circ}$ intrinsic polarization position angle and (-5.6$\pm$0.7)$\times$10$^{5}$ rotation measure, is 155$^{+9}_{-8}$, which is consistent with our new measurement of polarization position angle within 1$\sigma$. The polarization percentage and the polarization position angle may be varying over the period of our ALMA 12m Array observations, which demands further investigation with future polarization observations.
  • We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) Ka band (33 GHz) and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Band 3 (94.5 GHz) continuum images covering the nucleus and two extranuclear star-forming regions within the nearby galaxy NGC 3627 (M 66), observed as part of the Star Formation in Radio Survey (SFRS). Both images achieve an angular resolution of $\lesssim$2\arcsec, allowing us to map the radio spectral indices and estimate thermal radio fractions at a linear resolution of $\lesssim$90 pc at the distance of NGC 3627. The thermal fraction at 33 GHz reaches unity at and around the peaks of each HII region; we additionally observed the spectral index between 33 and 94.5 GHz to become both increasingly negative and positive away from the peaks of the HII regions, indicating an increase of non-thermal extended emission from diffusing cosmic-ray electrons and the possible presence of cold dust, respectively. While the ALMA observations were optimized for collecting continuum data, they also detected line emission from the $J=1\rightarrow0$ transitions of HCN and HCO$^{+}$. The peaks of dense molecular gas traced by these two spectral lines are spatially offset from the peaks of the 33 and 94.5 GHz continuum emission for the case of the extranuclear star-forming regions, indicating that our data reach an angular resolution at which one can spatially distinguish sites of recent star formation from the sites of future star formation. Finally, we find trends of decreasing dense gas fraction and velocity dispersion with increasing star formation efficiency among the three regions observed, indicating that the dynamical state of the dense gas, rather than its abundance, plays a more significant role in the star formation process.
  • The Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD) is an on-going multi-wavelength program to characterize the gas, star formation, and evolution in gas-rich, very low-mass galaxies that populate the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function. The galaxies were selected from the first ~10% of the HI ALFALFA survey based on their low HI mass and low baryonic mass. Here, we measure the star-formation properties from optically resolved stellar populations for 12 galaxies using a color-magnitude diagram fitting technique. We derive lifetime average star-formation rates (SFRs), recent SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions. Overall, the recent SFRs are comparable to the lifetime SFRs with mean birthrate parameter of 1.4, with a surprisingly narrow standard deviation of 0.7. Two galaxies are classified as dwarf transition galaxies (dTrans). These dTrans systems have star-formation and gas properties consistent with the rest of the sample, in agreement with previous results that some dTrans galaxies may simply be low-luminosity dIrrs. We do not find a correlation between the recent star-formation activity and the distance to the nearest neighboring galaxy, suggesting that the star-formation process is not driven by gravitational interactions, but regulated internally. Further, we find a broadening in the star-formation and gas properties (i.e., specific SFRs, stellar masses, and gas fractions) compared to the generally tight correlation found in more massive galaxies. Overall, the star-formation and gas properties indicate these very low-mass galaxies host a fluctuating, non-deterministic, and inefficient star-formation process.
  • We use ALMA to derive the mass, length, and time scales associated with the nuclear starburst in NGC 253. This region forms ~2 M_sun/yr of stars and resembles other starbursts in scaling relations, with star formation consuming the gas reservoir 10 times faster than in galaxy disks. We present observations of CO, the high effective density transitions HCN(1-0), HCO+(1-0), CS(2-1), and their isotopologues. We identify ten clouds that appear as peaks in line emission and enhancements in the HCN-to-CO ratio. These clouds are massive (~10^7 M_sun) structures with sizes (~30 pc) similar to GMCs in other systems. Compared to disk galaxy GMCs, they show high line widths (~20-40 km/s) given their size, with implied Mach numbers ~90. The clouds also show high surface (~6,000 M_sun/pc^2) and volume densities (n_H2~2,000 cm^-3). Given these, self-gravity can explain the line widths. This short free fall time (~0.7 Myr) helps explain the more efficient star formation in NGC 253. We also consider the starburst region as a whole. The geometry is confused by the high inclination, but simple models support a non-axisymmetric, bar-like geometry with a compact, clumpy region of high gas density embedded in an extended CO distribution. Even for the whole region, the surface density still exceeds that of a disk galaxy GMC. The orbital time (~10 Myr), disk free fall time (<~ 3 Myr), and disk crossing time (<~ 3 Myr) are each much shorter than in a normal spiral galaxy disk. Some but not all aspects of the structure correspond to predictions from assuming vertical dynamical equilibrium or a marginally stable rotating disk. Finally, the CO-to-H2 conversion factor implied by our cloud calculations is approximately Galactic, contrasting with results showing a low value for the whole starburst region. The contrast provides resolved support for the idea of mixed molecular ISM phases in starburst galaxies.
  • We present parsec scale interferometric maps of HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) emission from dense gas in the star-forming region 30 Doradus, obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This extreme star-forming region, located in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), is characterized by a very intense ultraviolet ionizing radiation field and sub-solar metallicity, both of which are expected to impact molecular cloud structure. We detect 13 bright, dense clumps within the 30 Doradus-10 giant molecular cloud. Some of the clumps are aligned along a filamentary structure with a characteristic spacing that is consistent with formation via the varicose fluid instability. Our analysis shows that the filament is gravitationally unstable and collapsing to form stars. There is a good correlation between HCO$^{+}$ emission in the filament and signatures of recent star formation activity including H$_{2}$O masers and young stellar objects (YSOs). YSOs seem to continue along the same direction of the filament toward the massive compact star cluster R136 in the southwest. We present detailed comparisons of clump properities (masses, linewidths, sizes) in 30Dor-10 to those in other star forming regions of the LMC (N159, N113, N105, N44). Our analysis shows that the 30Dor-10 clumps have similar mass but wider linewidths and similar HCN/HCO$^{+}$ (1-0) line ratios as clumps detected in other LMC star-forming regions. Our results suggest that the dense molecular gas clumps in the interior of 30Dor-10 are well-shielded against the intense ionizing field that is present in the 30Doradus region.
  • The under-abundance of very massive galaxies in the universe is frequently attributed to the effect of galactic winds. Although ionized galactic winds are readily observable most of the expelled mass is likely in cooler atomic and molecular phases. Expanding molecular shells observed in starburst systems such as NGC 253 and M 82 may facilitate the entrainment of molecular gas in the wind. While shell properties are well constrained, determining the amount of outflowing gas emerging from such shells and the connection between this gas and the ionized wind requires spatial resolution <100 pc coupled with sensitivity to a wide range of spatial scales, hitherto not available. Here we report observations of NGC 253, a nearby starburst galaxy (D~3.4 Mpc) known to possess a wind, which trace the cool molecular wind at 50 pc resolution. At this resolution the extraplanar molecular gas closely tracks the H{\alpha} filaments, and it appears connected to molecular expanding shells located in the starburst region. These observations allow us to directly measure the molecular outflow rate to be > 3 Msun/yr and likely ~9 Msun/yr. This implies a ratio of mass-outflow rate to star formation rate of at least {\eta}~1-3, establishing the importance of the starburst-driven wind in limiting the star formation activity and the final stellar content.
  • The amplitude of the magnetic field near the Galactic Centre has been uncertain by two orders of magnitude for several decades. On a scale of approximately 100 pc fields of approximately 1000 microG have been reported, implying a magnetic energy density more than 10,000 times stronger than typical for the Galaxy. Alternatively, the assumption of pressure equilibrium between the various phases of the Galactic Centre interstellar medium (including turbulent molecular gas; the contested "very hot" plasma; and the magnetic field) suggests fields of approximately 100 microG over approximately 400 pc size scales. Finally, assuming equipartition, fields of only approximately 6 microG have been inferred from radio observations for 400 pc scales. Here we report a compilation of previous data that reveals a down-break in the region's non-thermal radio spectrum (attributable to a transition from bremsstrahlung to synchrotron cooling of the in situ cosmic-ray electron population). We show that the spectral break requires that the Galactic Centre field be at least 50 microG on 400 pc scales, lest the synchrotron-emitting electrons produce too much gamma-ray emission given existing constraints. Other considerations support a field of 100 microG, implying that > 10% of the Galaxy's magnetic energy is contained in only < 0.05% of its volume.
  • New 12CO J=4-3 and 13CO J=3-2 observations of the N159 region in the Large Magellanic Cloud have been made. The 12CO J=4-3 distribution is separated into three clumps. These new measurements toward the three clumps are used in coupled calculations of molecular rotational excitation and line radiation transfer, along with other transitions of the 12CO as well as the isotope transitions of 13CO. The temperatures and densities are determined to be ~70-80K and ~3x10^3 cm-3 in N159W and N159E and ~30K and ~1.6x10^3 cm-3 in N159S. These results are compared with the star formation activity. The N159E clump is associated with embedded cluster(s) as observed at 24 micron and the derived high temperature is explained as due to the heating by these sources. The N159E clump is likely responsible for a dark lane in a large HII region by the dust extinction. The N159W clump is associated with embedded clusters mainly toward the eastern edge of the clump only. These clusters show offsets of 20"-40" from the 12CO J=4-3 peak and are probably responsible for heating indicated by the derived high temperature. The N159W clump exhibits no sign of star formation toward the 12CO J=4-3 peak position and its western region. We suggest that the N159W peak represents a pre-star-cluster core of ~105M_sol which deserves further detailed studies. Note that recent star formation took place between N159W and N159E as indicated by several star clusters and HII regions, while the natal molecular gas toward the stars have already been dissipated by the ionization and stellar winds of the OB stars. The N159S clump shows little sign of star formation as is consistent with the lower temperature and somewhat lower density. The N159S clump is also a candidate for future star formation.
  • We have applied the unsharp-masking technique to the 24 $\mu$m image of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to search for high-extinction regions. This technique has been used to locate very dense and cold interstellar clouds in the Galaxy, particularly infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). Fifty five candidate regions of high-extinction, namely high-contrast regions (HCRs), have been identified from the generated decremental contrast image of the SMC. Most HCRs are located in the southern bar region and mainly distributed in the outskirts of CO clouds, but most likely contain a significant amount of H2. HCRs have a peak-contrast at 24 $\mu$m of 2 - 2.5 % and a size of 8 - 14 pc. This corresponds to the size of typical and large Galactic IRDCs, but Galactic IRDCs are 2 - 3 times darker at 24 $\mu$m than our HCRs. To constrain the physical properties of the HCRs, we have performed NH3, N2H+, HNC, HCO+, and HCN observations toward one of the HCRs, HCR LIRS36-EAST, using the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Mopra single-dish radio telescope. We did not detect any molecular line emission, however, our upper limits to the column densities of molecular species suggest that HCRs are most likely moderately dense with n ~ 10^{3} cm-3. This volume density is in agreement with predictions for the cool atomic phase in low metallicity environments. We suggest that HCRs may be tracing clouds at the transition from atomic to molecule-dominated medium, and could be a powerful way to study early stages of gas condensation in low metallicity galaxies. Alternatively, if made up of dense molecular clumps < 0.5 pc in size, HCRs could be counterparts of Galactic IRDCs, and/or regions with highly unusual abundance of very small dust grains.