• Context. The extrasolar planet HAT-P-8 b was thought to be one of the more inflated transiting hot Jupiters. Aims. By using new and existing photometric data, we computed precise estimates of the physical properties of the system. Methods. We present photometric observations comprising eleven light curves covering six transit events, obtained using five medium-class telescopes and telescope-defocussing technique. One transit was simultaneously obtained through four optical filters, and two transits were followed contemporaneously from two observatories. We modelled these and seven published datasets using the jktebop code. The physical parameters of the system were obtained from these results and from published spectroscopic measurements. In addition, we investigated the theoretically-predicted variation of the apparent planetary radius as a function of wavelength, covering the range 330-960 nm. Results. We find that HAT-P-8 b has a significantly lower radius (1.321 R_Jup) and mass (1.275 M_Jup) compared to previous estimates (1.50 R_Jup and 1.52 M_Jup respectively). We also detect a radius variation in the optical bands that, when compared with synthetic spectra of the planet, may indicate the presence of a strong optical absorber, perhaps TiO and VO gases, near the terminator of HAT-P-8 b. Conclusions. These new results imply that HAT-P-8 b is not significantly inflated, and that its position in the planetary mass-radius diagram is congruent with those of many other transiting extrasolar planets.
  • We report the discovery and detailed monitoring of X-ray emission associated with the Type IIb SN 2011dh using data from the Swift and Chandra satellites, placing it among the best studied X-ray supernovae to date. We further present millimeter and radio data obtained with the SMA, CARMA, and EVLA during the first three weeks after explosion. Combining these observations with early optical photometry, we show that the panchromatic dataset is well-described by non-thermal synchrotron emission (radio/mm) with inverse Compton scattering (X-ray) of a thermal population of optical photons. In this scenario, the shock partition fractions deviate from equipartition by a factor, (e_e/e_B) ~ 30. We derive the properties of the shockwave and the circumstellar environment and find a shock velocity, v~0.1c, and a progenitor mass loss rate of ~6e-5 M_sun/yr. These properties are consistent with the sub-class of Type IIb SNe characterized by compact progenitors (Type cIIb) and dissimilar from those with extended progenitors (Type eIIb). Furthermore, we consider the early optical emission in the context of a cooling envelope model to estimate a progenitor radius of ~1e+11 cm, in line with the expectations for a Type cIIb SN. Together, these diagnostics are difficult to reconcile with the extended radius of the putative yellow supergiant progenitor star identified in archival HST observations, unless the stellar density profile is unusual. Finally, we searched for the high energy shock breakout pulse using X-ray and gamma-ray observations obtained during the purported explosion date range. Based on the compact radius of the progenitor, we estimate that the breakout pulse was detectable with current instruments but likely missed due to their limited temporal/spatial coverage. [Abridged]
  • We present new photometric and spectroscopic observations for 2M 1533+3759 (= NSVS 07826147). It has an orbital period of 0.16177042 day, significantly longer than the 2.3--3.0 hour periods of the other known eclipsing sdB+dM systems. Spectroscopic analysis of the hot primary yields Teff = 29230 +/- 125 K, log g = 5.58 +/- 0.03 and log N(He)/N(H) = -2.37 +/- 0.05. The sdB velocity amplitude is K1 = 71.1 +/- 1.0 km/s. The only detectable light contribution from the secondary is due to the surprisingly strong reflection effect. Light curve modeling produced several solutions corresponding to different values of the system mass ratio, q(M2/M1), but only one is consistent with a core helium burning star, q=0.301. The orbital inclination is 86.6 degree. The sdB primary mass is M1 = 0.376 +/- 0.055 Msun and its radius is R1 = 0.166 +/- 0.007 Rsun. 2M1533+3759 joins PG0911+456 (and possibly also HS2333+3927) in having an unusually low mass for an sdB star. SdB stars with masses significantly lower than the canonical value of 0.48 Msun, down to as low as 0.30 Msun, were theoretically predicted by Han et al. (2002, 2003), but observational evidence has only recently begun to confirm the existence of such stars. The existence of core helium burning stars with masses lower than 0.40--0.43 Msun implies that at least some sdB progenitors have initial main sequence masses of 1.8--2.0 Msun or more, i.e. they are at least main sequence A stars. The secondary is a main sequence M5 star.