• Some post-merger galaxies are known to undergo a starburst phase that quickly depletes the gas reservoir and turns it into a red-sequence galaxy, though the details are still unclear. Here we explore the pattern of recent star formation in the central region of the post-merger galaxy NGC7252 using high resolution UV images from the UVIT on ASTROSAT. The UVIT images with 1.2 and 1.4 arcsec resolution in the FUV and NUV are used to construct a FUV-NUV colour map of the central region. The FUV-NUV pixel colour map for this canonical post-merger galaxy reveals a blue circumnuclear ring of diameter $\sim$ 10 " (3.2 kpc) with bluer patches located over the ring. Based on a comparison to single stellar population models, we show that the ring is comprised of stellar populations with ages $\lesssim$ 300 Myr, with embedded star-forming clumps of younger age ($\lesssim$ 150Myr). The suppressed star formation in the central region, along with the recent finding of a large amount of ionised gas, leads us to speculate that this ring may be connected to past feedback from a central super-massive black hole that has ionised the hydrogen gas in the central $\sim$ 4" $\sim$ 1.3 kpc.
  • We report the ultraviolet imaging observation of a jellyfish galaxy obtained at high spatial resolution (1.3-to-1.5 $Kpc$) using UVIT on board ASTROSAT. Jellyfish galaxies observed in galaxy clusters are subjected to strong ram-pressure effects that strip the gas from the galaxy. The H$\alpha$ images of jellyfish galaxies reveal tails of ionized gas extending up to 100 $Kpc$, which could be hosting ongoing star formation. The star formation in the tentacles of the jellyfish galaxy JO201 in the Abell 85 galaxy cluster at redshift $\sim$ 0.056 is directly studied from ultraviolet imaging observations. The intense burst of star formation happening in the tentacles is the focus of the present study. JO201 is the "UV-brightest cluster galaxy" in Abell 85 with knots and streams of star formation in the ultraviolet. We identify the star forming knots both in the stripped gas and in the galaxy disk and compare the features seen in UV with the ones traced by $\mathrm{H}{\alpha}$ emission from data cubes taken as part of the GASP program using MUSE on the VLT. The UV and $\mathrm{H}{\alpha}$ emission in main body and along the tentacles of JO201 show a remarkable correlation. We created the $FUV$ extinction map of JO201 using the $\mathrm{H}{\alpha}$ and $\mathrm{H}{\beta}$ flux ratio. The star formation rates of individual knots are derived from the extinction corrected FUV emission, which agree very well with those derived from the $\rm H\alpha$ emission, and range from $\sim$ 0.01 -to- 2.07 $M_{\odot} \, yr^{-1}$. The integrated star formation rate from $FUV$ flux (SFR$_{FUV}$) is about $\sim$ 15 M$_{\odot}$/yr, which is rather typical for star forming galaxies of this mass in the local Universe. We demonstrate that the unprecedented deep UV imaging study of the jellyfish galaxy JO201 show clear sign of extraplanar star-formation activity, resulting from a recent/ongoing gas stripping event.
  • The tidal tails of post-merger galaxies exhibit ongoing star formation far from their disks. The study of such systems can be useful for our understanding of gas condensation in diverse environments. The ongoing star formation in the tidal tails of post-merger galaxies can be directly studied from ultraviolet (UV) imaging observations. The post merger galaxy NGC7252 ("Atoms-for-Peace" galaxy) is observed with the Astrosat UV imaging telescope (UVIT) in broadband NUV and FUV filters to isolate the star forming regions in the tidal tails and study the spatial variation in star formation rates. Based on ultraviolet imaging observations, we discuss star formation regions of ages $<$ 200 Myrs in the tidal tails. We measure star formation rates in these regions and in the main body of the galaxy. The integrated star formation rate of NGC7252 (i.e., that in the galaxy and tidal tails combined) without correcting for extinction is found to be 0.81 $\pm$ 0.01 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We show that the integrated star formation rate can change by an order of magnitude if the extinction correction used in star formation rates derived from other proxies are taken into consideration. The star formation rates in the associated tidal dwarf galaxies (NGC7252E, SFR=0.02 M$_{\odot}$/yr and NGC7252NW, SFR=0.03 M$_{\odot}$/yr) are typical of dwarf galaxies in the local Universe. The spatial resolution of the UV images reveals a gradient in star formation within the tidal dwarf galaxy. The star formation rates show a dependence on the distance from the centre of the galaxy. This can be due to the different initial conditions responsible for the triggering of star formation in the gas reservoir that was expelled during the recent merger in NGC7252.
  • The performance of the ultraviolet telescope (UVIT) on-board ASTROSAT is reported. The performance in orbit is also compared with estimates made from the calibrations done on the ground. The sensitivity is found to be within ~15% of the estimates, and the spatial resolution in the NUV is found to exceed significantly the design value of 1.8 arcsec and it is marginally better in the FUV. Images obtained from UVIT are presented to illustrate the details revealed by the high spatial resolution. The potential of multi-band observations in the ultraviolet with high spatial resolution is illustrated by some results.
  • We analyse new deep g and i-band imaging with the CFHT of 16 QSOs in the redshift range 0.9 to 1.3. The principal points of interest are the symmetry and signs of tidal effects in the QSO hosts and nearby (`companion') galaxies. The sample measures are compared with similar measures on randomly selected field galaxy samples. Asymmetry measures are made for all objects to g ~22, and magnitudes of all galaxies 2 magnitudes fainter. The QSOs are found in denser environments than the field, and are somewhat offset from the centroid of their surrounding galaxies. The QSO hosts appear more disturbed than other galaxies. While the QSO companions and field galaxies have the same average asymmetry, the distribution of asymmetry values is different. QSO companions within 15 arcsec are fainter than average field galaxies. We discuss scenarios that are consistent with these and other measured quantities.
  • We present imaging and spectroscopic observations for six quasars at z>5.9 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS). The CFHQS contains sub-surveys with a range of flux and area combinations to sample a wide range of quasar luminosities at z~6. The new quasars have luminosities 10 to 75 times lower than the most luminous SDSS quasars at this redshift. The least luminous quasar, CFHQS J0216-0455 at z=6.01, has absolute magnitude M_1450=-22.21, well below the likely break in the luminosity function. This quasar is not detected in a deep XMM-Newton survey showing that optical selection is still a very efficient tool for finding high redshift quasars.
  • We discuss selection of QSO candidates from the combined SDSS and GALEX catalogues. We discuss properties of QSOs within the combined sample, and note uncertainties in number counts and completeness, compared with other SDSS-based samples. We discuss colour and other properties with redshift within the sample and the SEDs for subsets. We estimate the numbers of faint QSOs that are classified as extended objects in the SDSS, and consequent uncertainties that follow.
  • We present HST spectroscopy of the nucleus of M31 obtained with STIS. Spectra taken around the CaT lines at 8500 see only the red giants in the double bright- ness peaks P1 and P2. In contrast, spectra taken at 3600-5100 A are sensitive to the tiny blue nucleus embedded in P2, the lower surface brightness red nucleus. P2 has a K-type spectrum, but the embedded blue nucleus has an A-type spectrum with strong Balmer absorption lines. Given the small likelihood for stellar collisions, a 200 Myr old starburst appears to be the most plausible origin of the blue nucleus. In stellar population, size, and velocity dispersion, the blue nucleus is so different from P1 and P2 that we call it P3. The line-of-sight velocity distributions of the red stars in P1+P2 strengthen the support for Tremaine s eccentric disk model. The kinematics of P3 is consistent with a circular stellar disk in Keplerian rotation around a super-massive black hole with M_bh = 1.4 x 10^8 M_sun. The P3 and the P1+P2 disks rotate in the same sense and are almost coplanar. The observed velocity dispersion of P3 is due to blurred rotation and has a maximum value of sigma = 1183+-201 km/s. The observed peak rotation velocity of P3 is V = 618+-81 km/s at radius 0.05" = 0.19 pc corresponding to a circular rotation velocity at this radius of ~1700 km/s. Any dark star cluster alternative to a black hole must have a half-mass radius <= 0.03" = 0.11 pc. We show that this excludes clusters of brown dwarfs or dead stars on astrophysical grounds.
  • A new ephemeris has been determined for the supersoft X-ray binary CAL 83 using MACHO photometry. With an improved orbital period of 1.047568 days, it is now possible to phase together photometric and spectroscopic data obtained over the past two decades with new far ultraviolet spectra taken with FUSE. We discuss the properties of the orbital and longterm optical light curves as well as the colors of CAL 83. In the far ultraviolet the only well-detected stellar feature is emission from the O VI resonance doublet. The radial velocity of this emission appears to differ from that of HeII in the optical region, although we only have partial phase coverage for the O VI line. The FUSE continuum variations are similar to the optical light curve in phase and amplitude.
  • We present and discuss optical imaging of 76 AGN which represent the 2MASS-selected sample for z<0.3, from a full list of 243. They are found to have dust-obscured nuclei, residing in host galaxies that show a high fraction (>70%) of tidal interactions. The derived luminosities of the AGN and host galaxies are similar to traditionally-selected AGN, and they may comprise some 40% of the total AGN population at low redshift. We have measured a number of host galaxy properties, and discuss their distributions and interrelations. We compare the 2MASS AGN with optically selected samples and the IRAS-selected galaxy samples, and discuss the differences in terms of merger processes and initial conditions.
  • Imaging and spectra of the lensed QSO pair 0957+561 are presented and discussed. The data are principally those from the STIS NUV MAMA, and cover rest wavelengths from 850A to 1350A. The QSOs are both extended over about 1 arcsec, with morphology that matches with a small rotation, and includes one feature aligned with the VLBI radio jets. This is the first evidence of lensed structure in the host galaxy. The off-nuclear spectra arise from emission line gas and a young stellar population. The gas has velocity components with radial velocities at least 1000 km/s with respect to the QSO BLR, and may be related to the damped Ly alpha absorber in the nuclear spectra.
  • Host galaxies of z ~ 4.7 QSOs (astro-ph/0212508)

    Dec. 20, 2002 astro-ph
    2 micron broad- and narrow-band imaging with the Gemini-N telescope of five z~4.7 QSOs, has resolved both the host galaxies and [O II] emission-line gas. The resolved fluxes of the host galaxies fall within the extrapolated spread of the K-z relationship for radio galaxies at lower redshifts, and their resolved morphology is irregular. The [O II] images indicate knots coincident with many continuum features and also some bright jet-like features near the nucleus. The line emission total fluxes indicate overall equivalent widths of 5 to 10 A at rest wavelengths. Two of the QSOs are in a local environment of faint galaxies of similar magnitude to the hosts, and three have nearby galaxies with excess narrow-band flux, which would be [O II] if they are at the QSO redshift.
  • We discuss near-infrared star counts at the Galactic pole with a view to guiding the NGST and ground-based NIR cameras. Star counts from deep K-band images from the CFHT are presented, and compared with results from the 2MASS survey and some Galaxy models. With appropriate corrections for detector artifacts and galaxies, the data agree with the models down to K~18, but indicate a larger population of fainter red stars. There is also a significant population of compact galaxies that extend to the observational faint limit of K=20.5. Recent Galaxy models agree well down to K$\sim$19, but diverge at fainter magnitudes.
  • Spectra of the magnetic white dwarf binary AM Her were obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) during three consecutive spacecraft orbits. These observations were split into 19 spectra of about 5 min duration (0.025P binary phase) partially covering the binary orbit. We report the phase-related changes in the far ultraviolet continuum light curve and the emission lines, noting particularly the behavior of O VI. We discuss the fluxes and velocities of the narrow and broad O VI emissions. We find the FUV light curve has maximum amplitude at ~1000A, although at shorter wavelengths the continuum may be strongly affected by overlapping Lyman lines. Weak, narrow Lyman absorption lines are present. Their velocities don't appear to vary over the observed orbital phases, and their mean value is consistent with the systemic velocity.
  • Observations obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) have been used to determine the column densities of D I, O I, and N I along seven sight lines that probe the local interstellar medium (LISM) at distances from 37 pc to 179 pc. Five of the sight lines are within the Local Bubble and two penetrate the surrounding H I wall. Reliable values of N(H I) were determined for five of the sight lines from HST data, IUE data, and published EUVE measurements. The weighted mean of D I/H I for these five sight lines is (1.52 +/- 0.08) x10-5 (1 sigma uncertainty in the mean). It is likely that the D I/H I ratio in the Local Bubble has a single value. The D I/O I ratio for the five sight lines within the Local Bubble is (3.76 +/- 0.20) x10-2. It is likely that the O I column densities can serve as a proxy for H I in the Local Bubble. The weighted mean for O I/H I for the seven FUSE sight lines is (3.03 +/-0.21) x10-4, comparable to the weighted mean (3.43 +/- 0.15) x10-4 reported for 13 sight lines probing larger distances and higher column densities (Meyer et al. 1998, Meyer 2001). The FUSE weighted mean of N I/H I for the five sight lines is half that reported by Meyer et al. (1997) for seven sight lines with larger distances and higher column densities. This result combined with the variability of O I/N I (six sight lines) indicates that at the low column densities found in the LISM, nitrogen ionization balance is important. Thus, unlike O I, N I cannot be used as a proxy for H I or as a metallicity indicator in the LISM. Subject Headings: cosmology: observations- ISM: abundances- ISM: evolution - Galaxy:abundances-Ultraviolet:ISM
  • We have undertaken a program of high-resolution imaging of high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs) using adaptive optics on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. We report on deep imaging in J, H,and K bands of 6 HzRGs in the redshift range 1.1 to 3.8. At these redshifts, near-infrared bandpasses sample the rest-frame visible galaxian light. The radio galaxy is resolved in all the fields and is generally elongated along the axis of the radio lobes. These images are compared to archival Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2 optical observations of the same fields and show the HzRG morphology in rest-frame ultraviolet and visible light is generally very similar: a string of bright compact knots. Furthermore, this sample - although very small - suggests the colors of the knots are consistent with light from young stellar populations. If true, a plausible explanation is that these objects are being assembled by mergers at high redshift.
  • We discuss the viability of shocks as the principal source of ionization for the Narrow Line Region of Seyfert galaxies. We present the preliminary results of [OIII]5007A and radio 3.6 cm imaging surveys of Seyferts, discuss the effects of shocks in the ionization of two galaxies, and also calculate an upper limit to the Hbeta luminosity that can be due to shocks in 36 galaxies with unresolved radio emission. We show that, for favored values of the shock parameters, that shocks cannot contribute more than ~15% of the ionizing photons in most galaxies.
  • We present far-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 5548 obtained in 2000 June with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Our data span the observed wavelength range 915--1185 Angstroms at a resolution of 20 km/s. The spectrum shows a weak continuum and emission from O VI, C III, and He II. The FUSE data were obtained when the AGN was in a low state, which has revealed strong, narrow O VI emission lines. We also resolve intrinsic, associated absorption lines of O VI and the Lyman series. Several distinct kinematic components are present, spanning a velocity range of 0 to -1300 km/s relative to systemic, with kinematic structure similar to that seen in previous observations of longer wavelength ultraviolet (UV) lines. We explore the relationship between the far-UV absorbers and those seen previously in the UV and X-rays. We find that the high-velocity UV absorption component is consistent with being low-ionization, contrary to some previous claims, and is consistent with its non-detection in high-resolution X-ray spectra. The intermediate velocity absorbers, at -300 to -400 km/s, show H I and O VI column densities consistent with having contributions from both a high-ionization X-ray absorber and a low-ionization UV absorber. No single far-UV absorbing component can be solely identified with the X-ray absorber.
  • The neutral hydrogen and the ionized helium absorption in the spectra of quasars are unique probes of structure in the early universe. We present Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer observations of the line of sight to the quasar HE2347-4342 in the 1000-1187 A band at a resolving power of 15,000. We resolve the He II Ly alpha absorption as a discrete forest of absorption lines in the redshift range 2.3 to 2.7. About 50 percent of these features have H I counterparts with column densities log N(HI) > 12.3 that account for most of the observed opacity in He II Ly alpha. The He II to H I column density ratio ranges from 1 to >1000 with an average of ~80. Ratios of <100 are consistent with photoionization of the absorbing gas by a hard ionizing spectrum resulting from the integrated light of quasars, but ratios of >100 in many locations indicate additional contributions from starburst galaxies or heavily filtered quasar radiation. The presence of He II Ly alpha absorbers with no H I counterparts indicates that structure is present even in low-density regions, consistent with theoretical predictions of structure formation through gravitational instability.
  • We present a moderate-resolution (~20 km/s) spectrum of the mini broad-absorption-line QSO PG1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the HST and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of CIII 977, Ly-beta, OVI 1032,1038, Ly-alpha, NV 1238,1242, SiIV 1393,1402, and CIV 1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of ~ -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The OVI emission feature is very weak, and the OVI/Lyalpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10^21 cm^-2, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.
  • We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based observations of a pair of galaxies at redshift 2.38, which are collectively known as 2142-4420 B1 (Francis et al. 1996). The two galaxies are both luminous extremely red objects (EROs), separated by 0.8 arcsec. They are embedded within a 100 kpc scale diffuse Ly-alpha nebula (or blob) of luminosity ~10^44 erg/s. The radial profiles and colors of both red objects are most naturally explained if they are young elliptical galaxies: the most distant yet found. It is not, however, possible to rule out a model in which they are abnormally compact, extremely dusty starbursting disk galaxies. If they are elliptical galaxies, their stellar populations have inferred masses of ~10^11 solar masses and ages of ~7x10^8 years. Both galaxies have color gradients: their centers are significantly bluer than their outer regions. The surface brightness of both galaxies is roughly an order of magnitude greater than would be predicted by the Kormendy relation. A chain of diffuse star formation extending 1 arcsec from the galaxies may be evidence that they are interacting or merging. The Ly-alpha nebula surrounding the galaxies shows apparent velocity substructure of amplitude ~ 700 km/s. We propose that the Ly-alpha emission from this nebula may be produced by fast shocks, powered either by a galactic superwind or by the release of gravitational potential energy.
  • We report the first detection of emission line gas within the host galaxies of high redshift QSOs. This was done using narrow-band imaging at the redshifted wavelengths of [O III] and H alpha, using the PUEO adaptive optics camera of the CFHT. The QSOs are all radio-quiet or very compact radio sources. In all five observed QSOs, which have redshifts 0.9 to 2.4, we find extended line emission that lies within 0.5" (a few Kpc) of the nucleus. The emission (redshifted) equivalent widths range from 35 to 300A. Where there is radio structure, the line emission is aligned with it. We also report on continuum fluxes and possible companions. Two of the QSOs are very red, and have high resolved continuum flux.
  • We compare the stellar wind features in far-UV spectra of Sk -67 111, an O7 Ib(f) star in the LMC, with Sk 80, an O7 Iaf+ star in the SMC. The most striking differences are that Sk 80 has a substantially lower terminal velocity, much weaker O VI absorption, and stronger S IV emission. We have used line-blanketed, hydrodynamic, non-LTE atmospheric models to explore the origin of these differences. The far-UV spectra require systematically lower stellar temperatures than previous determinations for O7 supergiants derived from plane-parallel, hydrostatic models of photospheric line profiles. At these temperatures, the O VI in Sk -67 111 must be due primarily to shocks in the wind.
  • This paper discusses the galaxy populations of three rich clusters, with redshift 0.19 (0839+29), 0.24 (1231+15), and 0.32 (1224+20), from the database of the CNOC1 consortium. The data consist of spectra of 52 cluster members for 0839+29, 30 members for 1224+15, and 82 members for 1231+15, and there are comparable numbers of field galaxy spectra. 0839+29 is compact with no strong radial gradients, and possibly dusty. 1224+20 is isolated in redshift, has low velocity dispersion around the cD galaxy, and low 4000A break. 1231+15 is asymmetrical and we discuss the possibility that it may be a recent merger of two old clusters. We find few galaxies in 0839+29 and 1231+15 with ongoing or recently truncated star-formation.
  • Longslit spectra of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 from the UV to near infrared have been obtained with STIS to study the kinematics and physical conditions in the NLR. The kinematics show evidence for three components, a low velocity system in normal disk rotation, a high velocity system in radial outflow at a few hundred km/s relative to the systemic velocity and an additional high velocity system also in outflow with velocities up to 1400 km/s, in agreement with results from STIS slitless spectroscopy (Hutchings et al., 1998, Kaiser et al., 1999, Hutchings et al., 1999) We have explored two simple kinematic models and suggest that radial outflow in the form of a wind is the most likely explanation. We also present evidence indicating that the wind may be decelerating with distance from the nucleus. We find that the emission line ratios along our slits are all entirely consistent with photoionization from the nuclear continuum source. A decrease in the [OIII]5007/H-beta and [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratios suggests that the density decreases with distance from the nucleus. This trend is borne out by the [SII] ratios as well. We find no strong evidence for interaction between the radio jet and the NLR gas in either the kinematics or the emission line ratios in agreement with the results of Kaiser et al. (1999) who find no spatial coincidence of NLR clouds and knots in the radio jet. These results are in contrast to other recent studies of nearby AGN which find evidence for significant interaction between the radio source and the NLR gas.