• For the first time a proper comparison of the average depth of shower maximum ($X_{\rm max}$) published by the Pierre Auger and Telescope Array Observatories is presented. The $X_{\rm max}$ distributions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory were fit using simulated events initiated by four primaries (proton, helium, nitrogen and iron). The primary abundances which best describe the Auger data were simulated through the Telescope Array (TA) Middle Drum (MD) fluorescence and surface detector array. The simulated events were analyzed by the TA Collaboration using the same procedure as applied to their data. The result is a simulated version of the Auger data as it would be observed by TA. This analysis allows a direct comparison of the evolution of $\langle X_{\rm max} \rangle$ with energy of both data sets. The $\langle X_{\rm max} \rangle$ measured by TA-MD is consistent with a preliminary simulation of the Auger data through the TA detector and the average difference between the two data sets was found to be $(2.9 \pm 2.7\;(\text{stat.}) \pm 18\;(\text{syst.}))~\text{g/cm}^2$.
  • We present a summary of the measurements of mass sensitive parameters at the highest cosmic ray energies done by several experiments. The Xmax distribution as a function of energy has been measured with fluorescence telescopes by the HiRes, TA and Auger experiments and with Cherenkov light detectors by Yakutsk. The <Xmax> or the average mass (<lnA>) has been also inferred using ground detectors, such as muon and water Cherenkov detectors. We discuss the different data analyses elaborated by each collaboration in order to extract the relevant information. Special attention is given to the different approaches used in the analysis of the data measured by fluorescence detectors in order to take into account detector biases. We present a careful analysis of the stability and performance of each analysis. The results of the different experiments will be compared and the discrepancies or agreements will be quantified.
  • The Central Laser Facility is located near the middle of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. It features a UV laser and optics that direct a beam of calibrated pulsed light into the sky. Light scattered from this beam produces tracks in the Auger optical detectors which normally record nitrogen fluorescence tracks from cosmic ray air showers. The Central Laser Facility provides a "test beam" to investigate properties of the atmosphere and the fluorescence detectors. The laser can send light via optical fiber simultaneously to the nearest surface detector tank for hybrid timing analyses. We describe the facility and show some examples of its many uses.