• APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing roughly 300,000 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding upon APOGEE's goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch (RGB) and red clump (RC) stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.
  • Red clump stars are fundamental distance indicators in astrophysics, although theoretical stellar models predict a dependence of absolute magnitudes with ages. This effect is particularly strong below 2 Gyr, but even above this limit a mild age dependence is still expected. We use seismically identified red clump stars in the Kepler field for which we have reliable distances, masses and ages from the SAGA survey to first explore this effect. By excluding red clump stars with masses larger than 1.6 Msun (corresponding to ages younger than 2 Gyr), we derive robust calibrations linking intrinsic colors to absolute magnitudes in the following photometric systems: Str\"omgren $by$, Johnson $BV$, Sloan $griz$, 2MASS $JHK_s$ and WISE $W1W2W3$. With the precision achieved we also detect a slope of absolute magnitudes 0.020(0.003) mag per Gyrin the infrared, implying that distance calibrations of clump stars can be off by up to 0.2 mag in the infrared (over the range from 2 Gyr to 12 Gyr) if their ages are unknown. Even larger uncertainties affect optical bands, because of the stronger interdependency of absolute magnitudes on colors and age. Our distance calibrations are ultimately based on asteroseismology, and we show how the distance scale can be used to test the accuracy of seismic scaling relations. Within the uncertainties our calibrations are in agreement with those built upon local red clump with Hipparcos} parallaxes, although we find a tension which if confirmed would imply that scaling relations overestimate radii of red clump stars by 2(+-20%. Data-releases post Gaia DR1 will provide an important testbed for our results.
  • The Ophiuchus stream is a recently discovered stellar tidal stream in the Milky Way. We present high-quality spectroscopic data for 14 stream member stars obtained using the Keck and MMT telescopes. We confirm the stream as a fast moving ($v_{los}\sim290$ km s$^{-1}$), kinematically cold group ($\sigma_{v_{los}}\lesssim1$ km s$^{-1}$) of $\alpha$-enhanced and metal-poor stars (${\rm [\alpha/Fe]\sim0.4}$ dex, ${\rm [Fe/H]\sim-2.0}$ dex). Using a probabilistic technique, we model the stream simultaneously in line-of-sight velocity, color-magnitude, coordinate, and proper motion space, and so determine its distribution in 6D phase-space. We find that that the stream extends in distance from 7.5 to 9 kpc from the Sun; it is 50 times longer than wide, merely appearing highly foreshortened in projection. The analysis of the stellar population contained in the stream suggests that it is $\sim12$ Gyr old, and that its initial stellar mass was $\sim2\times10^4$ $M_{\odot}$ (or at least $\gtrsim7\times10^3$ $M_{\odot}$). Assuming a fiducial Milky Way potential, we fit an orbit to the stream which matches the observed phase-space distribution, except for some tension in the proper motions: the stream has an orbital period of $\sim350$ Myr, and is on a fairly eccentric orbit ($e\sim0.66$) with a pericenter of $\sim3.5$ kpc and an apocenter of $\sim17$ kpc. The phase-space structure and stellar population of the stream show that its progenitor must have been a globular cluster that was disrupted only $\sim240$ Myr ago. We do not detect any significant overdensity of stars along the stream that would indicate the presence of a progenitor, and conclude that the stream is all that is left of the progenitor.
  • Extreme deconvolution (XD) of broad-band photometric data can both separate stars from quasars and generate probability density functions for quasar redshifts, while incorporating flux uncertainties and missing data. Mid-infrared photometric colors are now widely used to identify hot dust intrinsic to quasars, and the release of all-sky WISE data has led to a dramatic increase in the number of IR-selected quasars. Using forced-photometry on public WISE data at the locations of SDSS point sources, we incorporate this all-sky data into the training of the XDQSOz models originally developed to select quasars from optical photometry. The combination of WISE and SDSS information is far more powerful than SDSS alone, particularly at $z>2$. The use of SDSS$+$WISE photometry is comparable to the use of SDSS$+$ultraviolet$+$near-IR data. We release a new public catalogue of 5,537,436 (total; 3,874,639 weighted by probability) potential quasars with probability $P_{\textrm{QSO}} > 0.2$. The catalogue includes redshift probabilities for all objects. We also release an updated version of the publicly available set of codes to calculate quasar and redshift probabilities for various combinations of data. Finally, we demonstrate that this method of selecting quasars using WISE data is both more complete and efficient than simple WISE color-cuts, especially at high redshift. Our fits verify that above $z \sim 3$ WISE colors become bluer than the standard cuts applied to select quasars. Currently, the analysis is limited to quasars with optical counterparts, and thus cannot be used to find highly obscured quasars that WISE color-cuts identify in significant numbers.
  • (Abridged) Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the halo components of the Milky Way are explored, based on accurate determinations of the carbon-to-iron ([C/Fe]) abundance ratios and kinematic quantities for over 30000 calibration stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using our present criterion that low-metallicity stars exhibiting [C/Fe] ratios ("carbonicity") in excess of [C/Fe]$ = +0.7$ are considered CEMP stars, the global frequency of CEMP stars in the halo system for \feh\ $< -1.5$ is 8%; for \feh\ $< -2.0$ it is 12%; for \feh\ $<-2.5$ it is 20%. We also confirm a significant increase in the level of carbon enrichment with declining metallicity, growing from $<$[C/Fe]$>$ $\sim +1.0$ at \feh\ $= -1.5$ to $<$[C/Fe]$>$ $\sim +1.7$ at \feh\ $= -2.7$. The nature of the carbonicity distribution function (CarDF) changes dramatically with increasing distance above the Galactic plane, $|$Z$|$. For $|$Z$|$ $< 5$ kpc, relatively few CEMP stars are identified. For distances $|$Z$|$ $> 5$ kpc, the CarDF exhibits a strong tail towards high values, up to [C/Fe] $>$ +3.0. We also find a clear increase in the CEMP frequency with $|$Z$|$. For stars with $-2.0 <$ [Fe/H] $< -$1.5, the frequency grows from 5% at $|$Z$|$ $\sim 2$ kpc to 10% at $|$Z$|$ $\sim 10$ kpc. For stars with [Fe/H] $< -$2.0, the frequency grows from 8% at $|$Z$|$ $\sim 2$ kpc to 25% at $|$Z$|$ $\sim 10$ kpc. For stars with $-2.0 <$ [Fe/H] $< -$1.5, the mean carbonicity is $<$[C/Fe]$>$ $\sim +1.0$ for 0 kpc $<$ $|$Z$|$ $<$ 10 kpc, with little dependence on $|$Z$|$; for [Fe/H] $< -$2.0, $<$[C/Fe]$>$ $\sim +1.5$, again roughly independent of $|$Z$|$.