• Major mergers are considered to be a significant source of turbulence in clusters. We performed a numerical simulation of a major merger event using nested-grid initial conditions, adaptive mesh refinement, radiative cooling of primordial gas, and a homogeneous ultraviolet background. By calculating the microscopic viscosity on the basis of various theoretical assumptions and estimating the Kolmogorov length from the turbulent dissipation rate computed with a subgrid-scale model, we are able to demonstrate that most of the warm-hot intergalactic medium can sustain a fully turbulent state only if the magnetic suppression of the viscosity is considerable. Accepting this as premise, it turns out that ratios of turbulent and thermal quantities change only little in the course of the merger. This confirms the tight correlations between the mean thermal and non-thermal energy content for large samples of clusters in earlier studies, which can be interpreted as second self-similarity on top of the self-similarity for different halo masses. Another long-standing question is how and to which extent turbulence contributes to the support of the gas against gravity. From a global perspective, the ratio of turbulent and thermal pressures is significant for the clusters in our simulation. On the other hand, a local measure is provided by the compression rate, i.e. the growth rate of the divergence of the flow. Particularly for the intracluster medium, we find that the dominant contribution against gravity comes from thermal pressure, while compressible turbulence effectively counteracts the support. For this reason it appears to be too simplistic to consider turbulence merely as an effective enhancement of thermal energy.
  • We investigate turbulence generated by cosmological structure formation by means of large eddy simulations using adaptive mesh refinement. In contrast to the widely used implicit large eddy simulations, which resolve a limited range of length scales and treat the effect of turbulent velocity fluctuations below the grid scale solely by numerical dissipation, we apply a subgrid-scale model for the numerically unresolved fraction of the turbulence energy. For simulations with adaptive mesh refinement, we utilize a new methodology that allows us to adjust the scale-dependent energy variables in such a way that the sum of resolved and unresolved energies is globally conserved. We test our approach in simulations of randomly forced turbulence, a gravitationally bound cloud in a wind, and the Santa Barbara cluster. To treat inhomogeneous turbulence, we introduce an adaptive Kalman filtering technique that separates turbulent velocity fluctuations on resolved length scales from the non-turbulent bulk flow. From the magnitude of the fluctuating component and the subgrid-scale turbulence energy, a total turbulent velocity dispersion of several 100 km/s is obtained for the Santa Barbara cluster, while the low-density gas outside the accretion shocks is nearly devoid of turbulence. The energy flux through the turbulent cascade and the dissipation rate predicted by the subgrid-scale model correspond to dynamical time scales around 5 Gyr, independent of numerical resolution.
  • Baryonic streaming motions produced prior to the epoch of recombination became supersonic during the cosmic dark ages. Various studies suggest that such streaming velocities change the halo statistics and also influence the formation of Population III stars. In this study, we aim to explore the impact of streaming velocities on the formation of supermassive black holes at $z>10$ via the direct collapse scenario. To accomplish this goal, we perform cosmological large eddy simulations for two halos of a few times $\rm 10^{7} M_{\odot}$ with initial streaming velocities of 3, 6 and 9 $\rm km/s$. These massive primordial halos illuminated by the strong Lyman Werner flux are the potential cradles for the formation of direct collapse seed black holes. To study the evolution for longer times, we employ sink particles and track the accretion for 10,000 years. Our findings show that higher streaming velocities increase the circular velocities from about 14 $\rm km/s$ to 16 $\rm km/s$. They also delay the collapse of halos for a few million years, but do not have any significant impact on the halo properties such as turbulent energy, radial velocity, density and accretion rates. Sink particles of about $\rm \sim 10^5 M_{\odot}$ are formed at the end of our simulations and no clear distribution of sink masses is observed in the presence of streaming motions. It is further found that the impact of streaming velocities is less severe in massive halos compared to the minihalos as reported in the previous studies.
  • FEARLESS (Fluid mEchanics with Adaptively Refined Large Eddy SimulationS) is a numerical scheme for modelling subgrid-scale turbulence in cosmological adaptive mesh refinement simulations. In this contribution, the main features of this tool will be outlined. We discuss the application of this method to cosmological simulations of the large-scale structure. The simulations show that the production of turbulence has a different redshift dependence in the intra-cluster medium and the warm-hot intergalactic medium, caused by the distinct stirring mechanisms (mergers and shock interactions) acting in them. Some properties of the non-thermal pressure support in the two baryon phases are also described.
  • The injection and evolution of turbulence in the intergalactic medium is studied by means of mesh-based hydrodynamical simulations, including a subgrid scale (SGS) model for small-scale unresolved turbulence. The simulations show that the production of turbulence has a different redshift dependence in the intracluster medium (ICM) and the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We show that turbulence in the ICM is produced chiefly by merger-induced shear flows, whereas the production in the WHIM is dominated by shock interactions. Secondly, the effect of dynamical pressure support on the gravitational contraction has been studied. This turbulent support is stronger in the WHIM gas at baryon overdensities 1 < delta < 100, and less relevant for the ICM. Although the relative mass fraction of the gas with large vorticity is considerable (52% in the ICM), we find that for only about 10% in mass this is dynamically relevant, namely not associated to an equally large thermal pressure support. According to this result, a significant non-thermal pressure support counteracting the gravitational contraction is a localised characteristic in the cosmic flow, rather than a widespread feature.
  • The delayed detonation model describes the observational properties of the majority of type Ia supernovae very well. Using numerical data from a three-dimensional deflagration model for type Ia supernovae, the intermittency of the turbulent velocity field and its implications on the probability of a deflagration-to-detonation (DDT) transition are investigated. From structure functions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations, we determine intermittency parameters based on the log-normal and the log-Poisson models. On the other hand, the analysis of the turbulent velocity fluctuations in the vicinity of the flame front by Roepke suggests a much higher probability of large velocity fluctuations on the grid scale in comparison to the log-normal intermittency model. Following Pan et al., we computed probability density functions for a DDT for the different distributions. Assuming that a DDT can occur in the stirred flame regime, as proposed by Woosley et al., the log-normal model would imply a delayed detonation between 0.7 and 0.8 seconds after the beginning of the deflagration phase for the multi-spot ignition scenario used in the simulation. However, the probability drops to virtually zero if a DDT is further constrained by the requirement that the turbulent velocity fluctuations reach about 500 km/s. Under this condition, delayed detonations are only possible if the distribution of the velocity fluctuations is not log-normal. From our calculations follows that the distribution obtained by Roepke allow for multiple DDTs around 0.8 seconds after ignition at a transition density close to 1x10^7 g/cm^3.
  • The problem of the resolution of turbulent flows in adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) simulations is investigated by means of 3D hydrodynamical simulations in an idealised setup, representing a moving subcluster during a merger event. AMR simulations performed with the usual refinement criteria based on local gradients of selected variables do not properly resolve the production of turbulence downstream of the cluster. Therefore we apply novel AMR criteria which are optimised to follow the evolution of a turbulent flow. We demonstrate that these criteria provide a better resolution of the flow past the subcluster, allowing us to follow the onset of the shear instability, the evolution of the turbulent wake and the subsequent back-reaction on the subcluster core morphology. We discuss some implications for the modelling of cluster cold fronts.
  • The development of turbulent gas flows in the intra-cluster medium and in the core of a galaxy cluster is studied by means of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) cosmological simulations. A series of six runs was performed, employing identical simulation parameters but different criteria for triggering the mesh refinement. In particular, two different AMR strategies were followed, based on the regional variability of control variables of the flow and on the overdensity of subclumps, respectively. We show that both approaches, albeit with different results, are useful to get an improved resolution of the turbulent flow in the ICM. The vorticity is used as a diagnostic for turbulence, showing that the turbulent flow is not highly volume-filling but has a large area-covering factor, in agreement with previous theoretical expectations. The measured turbulent velocity in the cluster core is larger than 200 km/s, and the level of turbulent pressure contribution to the cluster hydrostatic equilibrium is increased by using the improved AMR criteria.
  • The onset of the thermonuclear runaway in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf, leading to the explosion as a type Ia supernova, is studied with hydrodynamical simulations. We investigate the evolution of temperature fluctuations (``bubbles'') in the WD's convective core by means of 2D numerical simulations. We show how the occurrence of the thermonuclear runaway depends on various bubble parameters. The relevance of the progenitor's composition for the ignition process is also discussed.
  • A simulation of the thermonuclear explosion of a Chandrasekhar-mass C+O white dwarf, the most popular scenario of a type Ia supernova (SN Ia), is presented. The underlying modeling is pursued in a self-consistent way, treating the combustion wave as a turbulent deflagration using well tested methods developed for laboratory combustion and based on the concept of `large eddy simulations' (LES). Such consistency requires to capture the onset of the turbulent cascade on resolved scales. This is achieved by computing the dynamical evolution on a 1024$^3$ moving grid, which resulted in the best-resolved three-dimensional SN Ia simulation carried out thus far, reaching the limits of what can be done on present supercomputers. Consequently, the model has no free parameters other than the initial conditions at the onset of the explosion, and therefore it has considerable predictive power. Our main objective is to determine to which extent such a simulation can account for the observations of normal SNe Ia. Guided by previous simulations with less resolution and a less sophisticated flame model, initial conditions were chosen that yield a reasonably strong explosion and a sufficient amount of radioactive nickel for a bright display. We show that observables are indeed matched to a reasonable degree. In particular, good agreement is found with the light curves of normal SNe Ia. Moreover, the model reproduces the general features of the abundance stratification as inferred from the analysis of spectra. This indicates that it captures the main features of the explosion mechanism of SNe Ia. However, we also show that even a seemingly best-choice pure deflagration model has shortcomings that indicate the need for a different mode of nuclear burning at late times, perhaps the transition to a detonation at low density.
  • We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the subgrid scale model in this paper as a basis for more advanced applications in numerical simulations of complex astrophysical phenomena involving turbulence.
  • The dynamics of the explosive burning process is highly sensitive to the flame speed model in numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae. Based upon the hypothesis that the effective flame speed is determined by the unresolved turbulent velocity fluctuations, we employ a new subgrid scale model which includes a localised treatment of the energy transfer through the turbulence cascade in combination with semi-statistical closures for the dissipation and non-local transport of turbulence energy. In addition, subgrid scale buoyancy effects are included. In the limit of negligible energy transfer and transport, the dynamical model reduces to the Sharp-Wheeler relation. According to our findings, the Sharp-Wheeler relation is insuffcient to account for the complicated turbulent dynamics of flames in thermonuclear supernovae. The application of a co-moving grid technique enables us to achieve very high spatial resolution in the burning region. Turbulence is produced mostly at the flame surface and in the interior ash regions. Consequently, there is a pronounced anisotropy in the vicinity of the flame fronts. The localised subgrid scale model predicts significantly enhanced energy generation and less unburnt carbon and oxygen at low velocities compared to earlier simulations.
  • We present a systematic survey of the capabilities of type Ia supernova explosion models starting from a number of flame seeds distributed around the center of the white dwarf star. To this end we greatly improved the resolution of the numerical simulations in the initial stages. This novel numerical approach facilitates a detailed study of multi-spot ignition scenarios with up to hundreds of ignition sparks. Two-dimensional simulations are shown to be inappropriate to study the effects of initial flame configurations. Based on a set of three-dimensional models, we conclude that multi-spot ignition scenarios may improve type Ia supernova models towards better agreement with observations. The achievable effect reaches a maximum at a limited number of flame ignition kernels as shown by the numerical models and corroborated by a simple dimensional analysis.
  • We apply an ad hoc model for dynamical ignition in three-dimensional numerical simulations of thermonuclear supernovae assuming pure deflagrations. The model makes use of the statistical description of temperature fluctuations in the pre-supernova core proposed by Wunsch & Woosley (2004). Randomness in time is implemented by means of a Poisson process. We are able to vary the explosion energy and nucleosynthesis depending on the free parameter of the model which controls the rapidity of the ignition process. However, beyond a certain threshold, the strength of the explosion saturates and the outcome appears to be robust with respect to number of ignitions. In the most energetic explosions, we find about 0.75 solar masses of iron group elements. Other than in simulations with simultaneous multi-spot ignition, the amount of unburned carbon and oxygen at radial velocities of a few 1000 km/s tends to be reduced for an ever increasing number of ignition events and, accordingly, more pronounced layering results.
  • We study the dynamics of thermonuclear flames propagating in fuel stirred by stochastic forcing. The fuel consists of carbon and oxygen in a state which is encountered in white dwarfs close to the Chandrasekhar limit. The level set method is applied to represent the flame fronts numerically. The computational domain for the numerical simulations is cubic, and periodic boundary conditions are imposed. The goal is the development of a suitable flame speed model for the small-scale dynamics of turbulent deflagration in thermonuclear supernovae. Because the burning process in a supernova explosion is transient and spatially inhomogeneous, the localised determination of subgrid scale closure parameters is essential. We formulate a semi-localised model based on the dynamical equation for the subgrid scale turbulence energy $k_{\mathrm{sgs}}$. The turbulent flame speed $s_{\mathrm{t}}$ is of the order $\sqrt{2k_{\mathrm{sgs}}}$. In particular, the subgrid scale model features a dynamic procedure for the calculation of the turbulent energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales, which has been successfully applied to combustion problems in engineering. The options of either including or suppressing inverse energy transfer in the turbulence production term are compared. In combination with the piece-wise parabolic method for the hydrodynamics, our results favour the latter option. Moreover, different choices for the constant of proportionality in the asymptotic flame speed relation, $s_{\mathrm{t}}\propto\sqrt{2k_{\mathrm{sgs}}}$, are investigated.
  • The piece-wise parabolic method (PPM) is applied to simulations of forced isotropic turbulence with Mach numbers $\sim 0.1... 1$. The equation of state is dominated by the Fermi pressure of an electron-degenerate fluid. The dissipation in these simulations is of purely numerical origin. For the dimensionless mean rate of dissipation, we find values in agreement with known results from mostly incompressible turbulence simulations. The calculation of a Smagorinsky length corresponding to the rate of numerical dissipation supports the notion of the PPM supplying an implicit subgrid scale model. In the turbulence energy spectra of various flow realisations, we find the so-called bottleneck phenomenon, i.e., a flattening of the spectrum function near the wavenumber of maximal dissipation. The shape of the bottleneck peak in the compensated spectrum functions is comparable to what is found in turbulence simulations with hyperviscosity. Although the bottleneck effect reduces the range of nearly inertial length scales considerably, we are able to estimate the value of the Kolmogorov constant. For steady turbulence with a balance between energy injection and dissipation, it appears that $C\approx 1.7$. However, a smaller value is found in the case of transonic turbulence with a large fraction of compressive components in the driving force. Moreover, we discuss length scales related to the dissipation, in particular, an effective numerical length scale $\Delta_{\mathrm{eff}}$, which can be regarded as the characteristic smoothing length of the implicit filter associated with the PPM.
  • We present numerical calculations of the parameters $C_{\nu}$, $C_{\epsilon}$ and $C_{\kappa}$ associated with the common closures for turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion. In the case of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, these parameters are expected to be statistically scale-invariant within the inertial subrange. In order to scrutinise this conjecture, we utilised a generalisation of the Germano filtering formalism, which is applicable to compressible flows as well. The filtering of data obtained from three-dimensional direct numerical simulations of forced isotropic turbulence with Mach numbers in the range $\sim 0.1...1$ then yielded values of the closure parameters associated with different length scales. The results indicate that the closure parameters are nearly universal for subsonic or moderately transonic flows, although the resolution of $432^{3}$ grid cells in our simulations is not quite sufficient to clearly establish scale invariance. In addition, it was found that the customary assumption of a kinetic Prandtl number of about unity for the gradient-diffusion closure is flawed due to the misalignment between turbulent flux and the gradient of the turbulence energy. Nevertheless, sound correlation can be achieved if the flux magnitude rather than the flux vector is locally matched. This conclusion is particularly useful for the family of subgrid scale models based on the turbulence energy equation. Furthermore, the parameter of production $C_{\nu}$ was computed in the fashion of dynamical procedures. Thereby, superior agreement between modelled and explicitly evaluated turbulence stresses in comparison to the eddy-viscosity closure with constant $C_{\nu}$ was verified.
  • We investigate the interaction of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions with vortical flows by means of numerical simulations. In our study, we focus on small scales, where the flame propagation is no longer dominated by the turbulent cascade originating from large-scale effects. Here, the flame propagation proceeds in the cellular burning regime, resulting from a balance between the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization. The interaction of a cellularly stabilized flame front with a vortical fuel flow is explored applying a variety of fuel densities and strengths of the velocity fluctuations. We find that the vortical flow can break up the cellular flame structure if it is sufficiently strong. In this case the flame structure adapts to the imprinted flow field. The transition from the cellularly stabilized front to the flame structure dominated by vortices of the flow proceeds in a smooth way. The implications of the results of our simulations for Type Ia Supernova explosion models are discussed.
  • We present a numerical investigation of the cellular burning regime in Type Ia supernova explosions. This regime holds at small scales (i.e. below the Gibson scale), which are unresolved in large-scale Type Ia supernova simulations. The fundamental effects that dominate the flame evolution here are the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization, leading to a stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The flame propagation into quiescent fuel is investigated addressing the dependence of the simulation results on the specific parameters of the numerical setup. Furthermore, we investigate the flame stability at a range of fuel densities. This is directly connected to the questions of active turbulent combustion (a mechanism of flame destabilization and subsequent self-turbulization) and a deflagration-to-detonation transition of the flame. In our simulations we find no substantial destabilization of the flame when propagating into quiescent fuels of densities down to ~10^7 g/cm^3, corroborating fundamental assumptions of large-scale SN Ia explosion models. For these models, however, we suggest an increased lower cutoff for the flame propagation velocity to take the cellular burning regime into account.
  • We present a numerical model which allows us to investigate thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions. The model is based on a finite-volume explicit hydrodynamics solver employing PPM. Using the level-set technique combined with in-cell reconstruction and flux-splitting schemes we are able to describe the flame in the discontinuity approximation. We apply our implementation to flame propagation in Chandrasekhar-mass Type Ia supernova models. In particular we concentrate on intermediate scales between the flame width and the Gibson-scale, where the burning front is subject to the Landau-Darrieus instability. We are able to reproduce the theoretical prediction on the growth rates of perturbations in the linear regime and observe the stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The increase of the mean burning velocity due to the enlarged flame surface is measured. Results of our simulation are in agreement with semianalytical studies.
  • We present a numerical model to study the behavior of thermonuclear flames in the discontinuity approximation. This model is applied to investigate the Landau-Darrieus instability under conditions found in Type Ia supernova explosions of Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs. This is a first step to explore the flame microstructure in these events. The model reproduces Landau's linearized stability analysis in early stages of the flame evolution and the stabilization in a cellular flame structure in the nonlinear stage.