• Recent studies establish that the cuprate pseudogap phase is susceptible at low temperatures to forming not only a $d$-symmetry superconducting (SC) state, but also a $d$-symmetry form factor (dFF) density wave (DW) state. The concurrent emergence of such distinct and unusual states from the pseudogap motivates theories that they are "intertwined" i.e derived from a quantum composite of dissimilar broken-symmetry orders. Some composite order theories predict that the balance between the different components can be altered, for example at superconducting vortex cores. Here, we introduce sublattice phase-resolved electronic structure imaging as a function of magnetic field and find robust dFF DW states induced at each vortex. They are predominantly unidirectional and co-oriented (nematic), exhibiting strong spatial-phase coherence. At each vortex we also detect the field-induced conversion of the SC to DW components and demonstrate that this occurs at precisely the eight momentum-space locations predicted in many composite order theories. These data provided direct microscopic evidence for the existence of composite order in the cuprates, and new indications of how the DW state becomes long-range ordered in high magnetic fields.
  • We analyze the interplay between a d-wave uniform superconducting and a pair-density-wave (PDW) order parameter in the neighborhood of a vortex. We develop a phenomenological nonlinear sigma-model, solve the saddle point equation for the order parameter configuration, and compute the resulting local density of states in the vortex halo. The intertwining of the two superconducting orders leads to a charge density modulation with the same periodicity as the PDW, which is twice the period of the charge-density-wave that arises as a second-harmonic of the PDW itself. We discuss key features of the charge density modulation that can be directly compared with recent results from scanning tunneling microscopy and speculate on the role PDW order may play in the global phase diagram of the hole-doped cuprates.
  • When very high magnetic fields suppress the superconductivity in underdoped cuprates, an exceptional new electronic phase appears. It supports remarkable and unexplained quantum oscillations and exhibits an unidentified density wave (DW) state. Although generally referred to as a "charge" density wave (CDW) because of the observed charge density modulations, theory indicates that this could actually be the far more elusive electron-pair density wave state (PDW). To search for evidence of a field-induced PDW in cuprates, we visualize the modulations in the density of electronic states $N(\bf{r})$ within the halo surrounding Bi$_2$Sr$_2$CaCu$_2$O$_8$ vortex cores. This reveals multiple signatures of a field-induced PDW, including two sets of $N(\bf{r})$ modulations occurring at wavevectors $\bf{Q}_P$ and $2\bf{Q}_P$, both having predominantly $s$-symmetry form factors, the amplitude of the latter decaying twice as rapidly as the former, along with induced energy-gap modulations at $\bf{Q}_P$ . Such a microscopic phenomenology is in detailed agreement with theory for a field-induced primary PDW that generates secondary CDWs within the vortex halo. These data indicate that the fundamental state generated by increasing magnetic fields from the underdoped cuprate superconducting phase is actually a PDW with approximately eight CuO$_2$ unit-cell periodicity ($\lambda = 8a_0$) and predominantly $d$-symmetry form factor.
  • There has been growing speculation that a pair density wave state is a key component of the phenomenology of the pseudogap phase in the cuprates. Recently, direct evidence for such a state has emerged from an analysis of scanning tunneling microscopy data in halos around the vortex cores. By extrapolation, these vortex halos would then overlap at a magnetic field scale where quantum oscillations have been observed. Here, we show that a biaxial pair density wave state gives a unique description of the quantum oscillation data, bolstering the case that the pseudogap phase in the cuprates may be a pair density wave state.
  • Theories based upon strong real space (r-space) electron electron interactions have long predicted that unidirectional charge density modulations (CDM) with four unit cell (4$a_0$) periodicity should occur in the hole doped cuprate Mott insulator (MI). Experimentally, however, increasing the hole density p is reported to cause the conventionally defined wavevector $Q_A$ of the CDM to evolve continuously as if driven primarily by momentum space (k-space) effects. Here we introduce phase resolved electronic structure visualization for determination of the cuprate CDM wavevector. Remarkably, this new technique reveals a virtually doping independent locking of the local CDM wavevector at $|Q_0|=2\pi/4a_0$ throughout the underdoped phase diagram of the canonical cuprate $Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O_8$. These observations have significant fundamental consequences because they are orthogonal to a k-space (Fermi surface) based picture of the cuprate CDM but are consistent with strong coupling r-space based theories. Our findings imply that it is the latter that provide the intrinsic organizational principle for the cuprate CDM state.
  • The quantum condensate of Cooper-pairs forming a superconductor was originally conceived to be translationally invariant. In theory, however, pairs can exist with finite momentum $Q$ and thereby generate states with spatially modulating Cooper-pair density. While never observed directly in any superconductor, such a state has been created in ultra-cold $^{6}$Li gas. It is now widely hypothesized that the cuprate pseudogap phase contains such a 'pair density wave' (PDW) state. Here we use nanometer resolution scanned Josephson tunneling microscopy (SJTM) to image Cooper-pair tunneling from a $d$-wave superconducting STM tip to the condensate of Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+x}$. Condensate visualization capabilities are demonstrated directly using the Cooper-pair density variations surrounding Zn impurity atoms and at the Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+x}$ crystal-supermodulation. Then, by using Fourier analysis of SJTM images, we discover the direct signature of a Cooper-pair density modulation at wavevectors $Q_{p} \approx (0.25,0)2\pi / a_{0}$;$(0,0.25)2\pi / a_{0}$ in Bi$_{2}$Sr$_{2}$CaCu$_{2}$O$_{8+x}$. The amplitude of these modulations is ~5% of the homogenous condensate density and their form factor exhibits primarily $s$/$s'$-symmetry. This phenomenology is expected within Ginzburg-Landau theory when a charge density wave with $d$-symmetry form factor and wave vector $Q_{c}=Q_{p}$ coexists with a homogeneous $d$-symmetry superconductor ; it is also encompassed by several contemporary microscopic theories for the pseudogap phase.
  • We demonstrate that the electronic bandstructure extracted from quasi-particle interference spectroscopy [Nat. Phys. 9, 468 (2013)] and the theoretically computed form of the superconducting gaps [Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 111, 11663 (2014)] can be used to understand the $dI/dV$ lineshape measured in the normal and superconducting state of CeCoIn$_5$ [Nat. Phys. 9, 474 92103)]. In particular, the $dI/dV$ lineshape, and the spatial structure of defect-induced impurity states, reflects the existence of multiple superconducting gaps of $d_{x^2-y^2}$-symmetry. These results strongly support a recently proposed microscopic origin of the unconventional superconducting state.
  • Extensive research into high temperature superconducting cuprates is now focused upon identifying the relationship between the classic 'pseudogap' phenomenon$^{1,2}$ and the more recently investigated density wave state$^{3-13}$. This state always exhibits wave vector $Q$ parallel to the planar Cu-O-Cu bonds$^{4-13}$ along with a predominantly $d$-symmetry form factor$^{14-17}$ (dFF-DW). Finding its microscopic mechanism has now become a key objective$^{18-30}$ of this field. To accomplish this, one must identify the momentum-space ($k$-space) states contributing to the dFF-DW spectral weight, determine their particle-hole phase relationship about the Fermi energy, establish whether they exhibit a characteristic energy gap, and understand the evolution of all these phenomena throughout the phase diagram. Here we use energy-resolved sublattice visualization$^{14}$ of electronic structure and show that the characteristic energy of the dFF-DW modulations is actually the 'pseudogap' energy $\Delta_{1}$. Moreover, we demonstrate that the dFF-DW modulations at $E=-\Delta_{1}$ (filled states) occur with relative phase $\pi$ compared to those at $E=\Delta_{1}$ (empty states). Finally, we show that the dFF-DW $Q$ corresponds directly to scattering between the 'hot frontier' regions of $k$-space beyond which Bogoliubov quasiparticles cease to exist$^{31,32,33}$. These data demonstrate that the dFF-DW state is consistent with particle-hole interactions focused at the pseudogap energy scale and between the four pairs of 'hot frontier' regions in $k$-space where the pseudogap opens.
  • Maximizing the sustainable supercurrent density, Jc, is crucial to high current applications of superconductivity and, to achieve this, preventing dissipative motion of quantized vortices is key. Irradiation of superconductors with high-energy heavy ions can be used to create nanoscale defects that act as deep pinning potentials for vortices. This approach holds unique promise for high current applications of iron-based superconductors because Jc amplification persists to much higher radiation doses than in cuprate superconductors without significantly altering the superconducting critical temperature. However, for these compounds virtually nothing is known about the atomic scale interplay of the crystal damage from the high-energy ions, the superconducting order parameter, and the vortex pinning processes. Here, we visualize the atomic-scale effects of irradiating FeSexTe1-x with 249 MeV Au ions and find two distinct effects: compact nanometer-sized regions of crystal disruption or 'columnar defects', plus a higher density of single atomic-site 'point' defects probably from secondary scattering. We show directly that the superconducting order is virtually annihilated within the former while suppressed by the latter. Simultaneous atomically-resolved images of the columnar crystal defects, the superconductivity, and the vortex configurations, then reveal how a mixed pinning landscape is created, with the strongest pinning occurring at metallic-core columnar defects and secondary pinning at clusters of pointlike defects, followed by collective pinning at higher fields.
  • To achieve and utilize the most exotic electronic phenomena predicted for the surface states of 3D topological insulators (TI),it is necessary to open a "Dirac-mass gap" in their spectrum by breaking time-reversal symmetry. Use of magnetic dopant atoms to generate a ferromagnetic state is the most widely used approach. But it is unknown how the spatial arrangements of the magnetic dopant atoms influence the Dirac-mass gap at the atomic scale or, conversely, whether the ferromagnetic interactions between dopant atoms are influenced by the topological surface states. Here we image the locations of the magnetic (Cr) dopant atoms in the ferromagnetic TI Cr$_{0.08}$(Bi$_{0.1}$Sb$_{0.9}$)$_{1.92}$Te$_3$. Simultaneous visualization of the Dirac-mass gap $\Delta(r)$ reveals its intense disorder, which we demonstrate directly is related to fluctuations in $n(r)$, the Cr atom areal density in the termination layer. We find the relationship of surface-state Fermi wavevectors to the anisotropic structure of $\Delta(r)$ consistent with predictions for surface ferromagnetism mediated by those states. Moreover, despite the intense Dirac-mass disorder, the anticipated relationship $\Delta(r)\propto n(r)$ is confirmed throughout, and exhibits an electron-dopant interaction energy $J^*$=145$meV\cdot nm^2$. These observations reveal how magnetic dopant atoms actually generate the TI mass gap locally and that, to achieve the novel physics expected of time-reversal-symmetry breaking TI materials, control of the resulting Dirac-mass gap disorder will be essential.
  • The identity of the fundamental broken symmetry (if any) in the underdoped cuprates is unresolved. However, evidence has been accumulating that this state may be an unconventional density wave. Here we carry out site-specific measurements within each CuO$_2$ unit-cell, segregating the results into three separate electronic structure images containing only the Cu sites (Cu(r)) and only the x/y-axis O sites (O$_x$(r) and O$_y$(r)). Phase resolved Fourier analysis reveals directly that the modulations in the O$_x$(r) and O$_y$(r) sublattice images consistently exhibit a relative phase of ${\pi}$. We confirm this discovery on two highly distinct cuprate compounds, ruling out tunnel matrix-element and materials specific systematics. These observations demonstrate by direct sublattice phase-resolved visualization that the density wave found in underdoped cuprates consists of modulations of the intra-unit-cell states that exhibit a predominantly d-symmetry form factor.
  • Direct visualization of electronic-structure symmetry within each crystalline unit cell is a new technique for complex electronic matter research. By studying the Bragg peaks in Fourier transforms of electronic structure images, and particularly by resolving both the real and imaginary components of the Bragg amplitudes, distinct types of intra-unit cell symmetry breaking can be studied. However, establishing the precise symmetry point of each unit cell in real space is crucial in defining the phase for such Bragg-peak Fourier analysis. Exemplary of this challenge is the high temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+d for which the surface Bi atom locations are observable, while it is the invisible Cu atoms that define the relevant CuO2 unit-cell symmetry point. Here we demonstrate, by imaging with picometer precision the electronic impurity states at individual Zn atoms substituted at Cu sites, that the phase established using the Bi lattice produces a ~2% (2pi) error relative to the actual Cu lattice. Such a phase assignment error would not diminish reliability in the determination of intra-unit-cell rotational symmetry breaking at the CuO2 plane. Moreover, this type of impurity atom substitution at the relevant symmetry site can be of general utility in phase determination for Bragg-peak Fourier analysis of intra-unit-cell symmetry.
  • We review the current state of efforts to use resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSXS), which is an elastic, momentum-resolved, valence band probe of strongly correlated electron systems, to study stripe-like phenomena in copper-oxide superconductors and related materials. We review the historical progress including RSXS studies of Wigner crystallization in spin ladder materials, stripe order in 214-phase nickelates, 214-phase cuprates, and other systems. One of the major outstanding issues in RSXS concerns its relationship to more established valence band probes, namely angle-resolved photoemission (ARPES) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). These techniques are widely understood as measuring a one-electron spectral function, yet a relationship between RSXS and a spectral function has so far been unclear. Using physical arguments that apply at the oxygen $K$ edge, we show that RSXS measures the square modulus of an advanced version of the Green's function measured with STM. This indicates that, despite being a momentum space probe, RSXS is more closely related to STM than to ARPES techniques. Finally, we close with some discussion of the most promising future directions for RSXS. We will argue that the most promising area lies in high magnetic field studies, particularly of edge states in strongly correlated heterostructures, and the vortex state in superconducting cuprates, where RSXS may clarify the anomalous periodicities observed in recent quantum oscillation experiments.