• We present a comparative study of absolute distances to a sample of very nearby, bright Type Ia supernovae (SNe) derived from high cadence, high signal-to-noise, multi-band photometric data. Our sample consists of four SNe: 2012cg, 2012ht, 2013dy and 2014J. We present new homogeneous, high-cadence photometric data in Johnson-Cousins BVRI and Sloan g'r'i'z' bands taken from two sites (Piszkesteto and Baja, Hungary), and the light curves are analyzed with publicly available light curve fitters (MLCS2k2, SNooPy2 and SALT2.4). When comparing the best-fit parameters provided by the different codes, it is found that the distance moduli of moderately-reddened SNe Ia agree within ~0.2 mag, and the agreement is even better (< 0.1 mag) for the highest signal-to-noise BVRI data. For the highly-reddened SN~2014J the dispersion of the inferred distance moduli is slightly higher. These SN-based distances are in good agreement with the Cepheid distances to their host galaxies. We conclude that the current state-of-the-art light curve fitters for Type Ia SNe can provide consistent absolute distance moduli having less than ~0.1 -- 0.2 mag uncertainty for nearby SNe. Still, there is room for future improvements to reach the desired ~0.05 mag accuracy in the absolute distance modulus.
  • The SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES (SUSHIES) survey aims to provide strong new constraints on the progenitors of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) by understanding the relationship to their host galaxies. We present the photometric properties of 53 H-poor and 16 H-rich SLSN host galaxies out to $z\sim4$. We model their spectral energy distributions to derive physical properties, which we compare with other galaxy populations. At low redshift, H-poor SLSNe are preferentially found in very blue, low-mass galaxies with high average specific star-formation rates. As redshift increases, the host population follows the general evolution of star-forming galaxies towards more luminous galaxies. After accounting for secular evolution, we find evidence for differential evolution in galaxy mass, but not in the $B$-band and the far UV luminosity ($3\sigma$ confidence). Most remarkable is the scarcity of hosts with stellar masses above $10^{10}~M_\odot$ for both classes of SLSNe. In the case of H-poor SLSNe, we attribute this to a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.4$ solar metallicity. However, we argue that, in addition to low metallicity, a short-lived stellar population is also required to regulate the SLSN production. H-rich SLSNe are found in a very diverse population of star-forming galaxies. Still, the scarcity of massive hosts suggests a stifled production efficiency above $\sim0.8$ solar metallicity. The large dispersion of the H-rich SLSNe host properties is in stark contrast to those of gamma-ray burst, regular core-collapse SN, and H-poor SLSNe host galaxies. We propose that multiple progenitor channels give rise to this sub-class.
  • Most massive stars end their lives in core-collapse supernova explosions and enrich the interstellar medium with explosively nucleosynthesized elements. Following core collapse, the explosion is subject to instabilities as the shock propagates outwards through the progenitor star. Observations of the composition and structure of the innermost regions of a core-collapse supernova provide a direct probe of the instabilities and nucleosynthetic products. SN 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of very few supernovae for which the inner ejecta can be spatially resolved but are not yet strongly affected by interaction with the surroundings. Our observations of SN 1987A with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are of the highest resolution to date and reveal the detailed morphology of cold molecular gas in the innermost regions of the remnant. The 3D distributions of carbon and silicon monoxide (CO and SiO) emission differ, but both have a central deficit, or torus-like distribution, possibly a result of radioactive heating during the first weeks ("nickel heating"). The size scales of the clumpy distribution are compared quantitatively to models, demonstrating how progenitor and explosion physics can be constrained.
  • We report the first results from our long-term observational survey aimed at discovering late-time interaction between the ejecta of hydrogen-poor Type I supernovae and the hydrogen-rich envelope expelled from the progenitor star several decades/centuries before explosion. The expelled envelope, moving with a velocity of ~10 -- 100 km s$^{-1}$, is expected to be caught up by the fast-moving SN ejecta several years/decades after explosion depending on the history of the mass-loss process acting in the progenitor star prior to explosion. The collision between the SN ejecta and the circumstellar envelope results in net emission in the Balmer-lines, especially in H-alpha. We look for signs of late-time H-alpha emission in older Type Ia/Ibc/IIb SNe having hydrogen-poor ejecta, via narrow-band imaging. Continuum-subtracted H-alpha emission has been detected for 13 point sources: 9 SN Ibc, 1 SN IIb and 3 SN Ia events. Thirty-eight SN sites were observed on at least two epochs, from which three objects (SN 1985F, SN 2005kl, SN 2012fh) showed significant temporal variation in the strength of their H-alpha emission in our DIAFI data. This suggests that the variable emission is probably not due to nearby H II regions unassociated with the SN, and hence is an important additional hint that ejecta-CSM interaction may take place in these systems. Moreover, we successfully detected the late-time H-alpha emission from the Type Ib SN 2014C, which was recently discovered as a strongly interacting SN in various (radio, infrared, optical and X-ray) bands.
  • When a star passes within the tidal radius of a supermassive black hole, it will be torn apart. For a star with the mass of the Sun ($M_\odot$) and a non-spinning black hole with a mass $<10^8 M_\odot$, the tidal radius lies outside the black hole event horizon and the disruption results in a luminous flare. Here we report observations over a period of 10 months of a transient, hitherto interpreted as a superluminous supernova. Our data show that the transient rebrightened substantially in the ultraviolet and that the spectrum went through three different spectroscopic phases without ever becoming nebular. Our observations are more consistent with a tidal disruption event than a superluminous supernova because of the temperature evolution, the presence of highly ionised CNO gas in the line of sight and our improved localisation of the transient in the nucleus of a passive galaxy, where the presence of massive stars is highly unlikely. While the supermassive black hole has a mass $> 10^8 M_\odot$, a star with the same mass as the Sun could be disrupted outside the event horizon if the black hole were spinning rapidly. The rapid spin and high black hole mass can explain the high luminosity of this event.
  • Due to its proximity, SN 1987A offers a unique opportunity to directly observe the geometry of a stellar explosion as it unfolds. Here we present spectral and imaging observations of SN 1987A obtained ~10,000 days after the explosion with HST/STIS and VLT/SINFONI at optical and near-infrared wavelengths. These observations allow us to produce the most detailed 3D map of H-alpha to date, the first 3D maps for [Ca II] \lambda \lambda 7292, 7324, [O I] \lambda \lambda 6300, 6364 and Mg II \lambda \lambda 9218, 9244, as well as new maps for [Si I]+[Fe II] 1.644 \mu m and He I 2.058 \mu m. A comparison with previous observations shows that the [Si I]+[Fe II] flux and morphology have not changed significantly during the past ten years, providing evidence that it is powered by 44Ti. The time-evolution of H-alpha shows that it is predominantly powered by X-rays from the ring, in agreement with previous findings. All lines that have sufficient signal show a similar large-scale 3D structure, with a north-south asymmetry that resembles a broken dipole. This structure correlates with early observations of asymmetries, showing that there is a global asymmetry that extends from the inner core to the outer envelope. On smaller scales, the two brightest lines, H-alpha and [Si I]+[Fe II] 1.644 \mu m, show substructures at the level of ~ 200 - 1000 km/s and clear differences in their 3D geometries. We discuss these results in the context of explosion models and the properties of dust in the ejecta.
  • The recent discovery of the unprecedentedly superluminous transient ASASSN-15lh (or SN 2015L) with its UV-bright secondary peak challenges all the power-input models that have been proposed for superluminous supernovae. Here we examine some of the few viable interpretations of ASASSN-15lh in the context of a stellar explosion, involving combinations of one or more power inputs. We model the lightcurve of ASASSN-15lh with a hybrid model that includes contributions from magnetar spin-down energy and hydrogen-poor circumstellar interaction. We also investigate models of pure circumstellar interaction with a massive hydrogen-deficient shell and discuss the lack of interaction features in the observed spectra. We find that, as a supernova ASASSN-15lh can be best modeled by the energetic core-collapse of a ~40 Msun star interacting with a hydrogen-poor shell of ~20 Msun. The circumstellar shell and progenitor mass are consistent with a rapidly rotating pulsational pair-instability supernova progenitor as required for strong interaction following the final supernova explosion. Additional energy injection by a magnetar with initial period of 1-2 ms and magnetic field of 0.1-1 x 10^14 G may supply the excess luminosity required to overcome the deficit in single-component models, but this requires more fine-tuning and extreme parameters for the magnetar, as well as the assumption of efficient conversion of magnetar energy into radiation. We thus favor a single-input model where the reverse shock formed in a strong SN ejecta-CSM interaction following a very powerful core-collapse SN explosion can supply the luminosity needed to reproduce the late-time UV-bright plateau.
  • We present extensive optical ($UBVRI$, $g'r'i'z'$, and open CCD) and near-infrared ($ZYJH$) photometry for the very nearby Type IIP SN ~2013ej extending from +1 to +461 days after shock breakout, estimated to be MJD $56496.9\pm0.3$. Substantial time series ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy obtained from +8 to +135 days are also presented. Considering well-observed SNe IIP from the literature, we derive $UBVRIJHK$ bolometric calibrations from $UBVRI$ and unfiltered measurements that potentially reach 2\% precision with a $B-V$ color-dependent correction. We observe moderately strong Si II $\lambda6355$ as early as +8 days. The photospheric velocity ($v_{\rm ph}$) is determined by modeling the spectra in the vicinity of Fe II $\lambda5169$ whenever observed, and interpolating at photometric epochs based on a semianalytic method. This gives $v_{\rm ph} = 4500\pm500$ km s$^{-1}$ at +50 days. We also observe spectral homogeneity of ultraviolet spectra at +10--12 days for SNe IIP, while variations are evident a week after explosion. Using the expanding photosphere method, from combined analysis of SN 2013ej and SN 2002ap, we estimate the distance to the host galaxy to be $9.0_{-0.6}^{+0.4}$ Mpc, consistent with distance estimates from other methods. Photometric and spectroscopic analysis during the plateau phase, which we estimated to be $94\pm7$ days long, yields an explosion energy of $0.9\pm0.3\times10^{51}$ ergs, a final pre-explosion progenitor mass of $15.2\pm4.2$~M$_\odot$ and a radius of $250\pm70$~R$_\odot$. We observe a broken exponential profile beyond +120 days, with a break point at +$183\pm16$ days. Measurements beyond this break time yield a $^{56}$Ni mass of $0.013\pm0.001$~M$_\odot$.
  • SN 2012dn is a super-Chandrasekhar mass candidate in a purportedly normal spiral (SAcd) galaxy, and poses a challenge for theories of type Ia supernova diversity. Here we utilize the fast and highly parameterized spectrum synthesis tool, SYNAPPS, to estimate relative expansion velocities of species inferred from optical spectra obtained with six facilities. As with previous studies of normal SN Ia, we find that both unburned carbon and intermediate mass elements are spatially coincident within the ejecta near and below 14,000 km/s. Although the upper limit on SN 2012dn's peak luminosity is comparable to some of the most luminous normal SN Ia, we find a progenitor mass exceeding ~1.6 Msun is not strongly favored by leading merger models since these models do not accurately predict spectroscopic observations of SN 2012dn and more normal events. In addition, a comparison of light curves and host-galaxy masses for a sample of literature and Palomar Transient Factory SN Ia reveals a diverse distribution of SN Ia subtypes where carbon-rich material remains unburned in some instances. Such events include SN 1991T, 1997br, and 1999aa where trace signatures of C III at optical wavelengths are presumably detected.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN 2013fc, a bright type II supernova (SN) in a circumnuclear star-forming ring in the luminous infrared galaxy ESO 154-G010, observed as part of the Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects (PESSTO). SN 2013fc is both photometrically and spectroscopically similar to the well-studied type IIn SN 1998S and to the bright type II-L SN 1979C. It exhibits an initial linear decline, followed by a short plateau phase and a tail phase with a decline too fast for $^{56}$Co decay with full gamma-ray trapping. Initially the spectrum was blue and featureless. Later on, a strong broad ($\sim 8000$ km s$^{-1}$) H $\alpha$ emission profile became prominent. We apply a Starlight stellar population model fit to the SN location (observed when the SN had faded) to estimate a high extinction of $A_V = 2.9 \pm 0.2$ mag and an age of $10_{-2}^{+3}$ Myr for the underlying cluster. We compare the SN to SNe 1998S and 1979C and discuss its possible progenitor star considering the similarities to these events. With a peak brightness of $B = -20.46 \pm 0.21$ mag, SN 2013fc is 0.9 mag brighter than SN 1998S and of comparable brightness to SN 1979C. We suggest that SN 2013fc was consistent with a massive red supergiant (RSG) progenitor. Recent mass loss probably due to a strong RSG wind created the circumstellar matter illuminated through its interaction with the SN ejecta. We also observe a near-infrared excess, possibly due to newly condensed dust.
  • SN 2013dy is a Type Ia supernova for which we have compiled an extraordinary dataset spanning from 0.1 to ~ 500 days after explosion. We present 10 epochs of ultraviolet (UV) through near-infrared (NIR) spectra with HST/STIS, 47 epochs of optical spectra (15 of them having high resolution), and more than 500 photometric observations in the BVrRiIZYJH bands. SN 2013dy has a broad and slowly declining light curve (delta m(B) = 0.92 mag), shallow Si II 6355 absorption, and a low velocity gradient. We detect strong C II in our earliest spectra, probing unburned progenitor material in the outermost layers of the SN ejecta, but this feature fades within a few days. The UV continuum of SN 2013dy, which is strongly affected by the metal abundance of the progenitor star, suggests that SN 2013dy had a relatively high-metallicity progenitor. Examining one of the largest single set of high-resolution spectra for a SN Ia, we find no evidence of variable absorption from circumstellar material. Combining our UV spectra, NIR photometry, and high-cadence optical photometry, we construct a bolometric light curve, showing that SN 2013dy had a maximum luminosity of 10.0^{+4.8}_{-3.8} * 10^{42} erg/s. We compare the synthetic light curves and spectra of several models to SN 2013dy, finding that SN 2013dy is in good agreement with a solar-metallicity W7 model.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are very bright explosions that were only discovered recently and that show a preference for occurring in faint dwarf galaxies. Understanding why stellar evolution yields different types of stellar explosions in these environments is fundamental in order to both uncover the elusive progenitors of SLSNe and to study star formation in dwarf galaxies. In this paper, we present the first results of our project to study SUperluminous Supernova Host galaxIES, focusing on the sample for which we have obtained spectroscopy. We show that SLSNe-I and SLSNe-R (hydrogen-poor) often (~50% in our sample) occur in a class of galaxies that is known as Extreme Emission Line Galaxies (EELGs). The probability of this happening by chance is negligible and we therefore conclude that the extreme environmental conditions and the SLSN phenomenon are related. In contrast, SLSNe-II (hydrogen-rich) occur in more massive, more metal-rich galaxies with softer radiation fields. Therefore, if SLSNe-II constitute a uniform class, their progenitor systems are likely different from those of H-poor SLSNe. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are, on average, not found in as extreme environments as H-poor SLSNe. We propose that H-poor SLSNe result from the very first stars exploding in a starburst, even earlier than GRBs. This might indicate a bottom-light initial mass function in these systems. SLSNe present a novel method of selecting candidate EELGs independent of their luminosity.
  • Aims: The aim of this paper is twofold: 1) to investigate the properties of extragalactic dust and compare them to what is seen in the Galaxy; 2) to address in an independent way the problem of the anomalous extinction curves reported for reddened Type Ia Supernovae (SN) in connection to the environments in which they explode. Methods: The properties of the dust are derived from the wavelength dependence of the continuum polarization observed in four reddened Type Ia SN: 1986G, 2006X, 2008fp, and 2014J. [...] Results: All four objects are characterized by exceptionally low total-to-selective absorption ratios (R_V) and display an anomalous interstellar polarization law, characterized by very blue polarization peaks. In all cases the polarization position angle is well aligned with the local spiral structure. While SN~1986G is compatible with the most extreme cases of interstellar polarization known in the Galaxy, SN2006X, 2008fp, and 2014J show unprecedented behaviours. The observed deviations do not appear to be connected to selection effects related to the relatively large amounts of reddening characterizing the objects in the sample. Conclusions: The dust responsible for the polarization of these four SN is most likely of interstellar nature. The polarization properties can be interpreted in terms of a significantly enhanced abundance of small grains. The anomalous behaviour is apparently associated with the properties of the galactic environment in which the SN explode, rather than with the progenitor system from which they originate. For the extreme case of SN2014J, we cannot exclude the contribution of light scattered by local material; however, the observed polarization properties require an ad hoc geometrical dust distribution.
  • We analyse the early-time optical light curves (LCs) of 20 Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) SN survey II, aiming to study their properties as well as to derive their progenitor parameters. High-cadence, multi-band LCs are fitted with a functional model and the best-fit parameters are compared among the SN types. Bolometric LCs (BLCs) are constructed for the entire sample. We computed the black-body (BB) temperature (T_BB) and photospheric radius (R_ph) evolution for each SN via BB fits on the spectral energy distributions. In addition, the BLC properties are compared to model expectations. Complementing our sample with literature data, we find that SNe Ic and Ic-BL (broad-line) have shorter rise times than those of SNe Ib and IIb. \Delta m_15 is similar among the different sub-types. SNe Ic appear brighter and bluer than SNe Ib, but this difference vanishes if we consider host galaxy extinction corrections based on colors. Our SNe have typical T_BB ~ 10000 K at peak, and R_ph ~ 10^15 cm. Analysis of the BLCs of SNe Ib and Ic gives typical ejecta masses M_ej = 3.6-5.7 M_sun, energies E_K = 1.5-1.7x10^51 erg, and M(^56Ni) = 0.3 M_sun. Higher values for E_K and M(^56Ni) are estimated for SNe Ic-BL (M_ej = 5.4 M_sun, E_K = 10.7x10^51 erg, M(^56Ni) = 1.1 M_sun). For the majority of SNe Ic and Ic-BL we can put strong limits (<2-4 days) on the duration of the expected early-time plateau. In the case of SN Ib 2006lc, a >5.9 days plateau seems to be detected. The rising part of the BLCs is reproduced by power laws with index <2. For two SNe we a possible shock break-out cooling tail. Based on the limits for the plateau length and on the slow rise of the BLCs, we find that in most of our SNe Ic and Ic-BL the ^56Ni is mixed up to the outer layers, suggesting that SN Ic progenitors are de facto helium poor.
  • We present follow-up observations of an optical transient (OT) discovered by ROTSE on Jan. 21, 2009. Photometric monitoring was carried out with ROTSE-IIIb in the optical and Swift in the UV up to +70 days after discovery. The light curve showed a fast rise time of ~10 days followed by a steep decline over the next 60 days, which was much faster than that implied by 56Ni - 56Co radioactive decay. The SDSS DR10 database contains a faint, red object at the position of the OT, which appears slightly extended. This and other lines of evidence suggest that the OT is of extragalactic origin, and this faint object is likely the host galaxy. A sequence of optical spectra obtained with the 9.2-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) between +8 and +45 days after discovery revealed a hot, blue continuum with no visible spectral features. A few weak features that appeared after +30 days probably originated from the underlying host. Fitting synthetic templates to the observed spectrum of the host galaxy revealed a redshift of z = 0.19. At this redshift the peak magnitude of the OT is close to -22.5, similar to the brightest super-luminous supernovae; however, the lack of identifiable spectral features makes the massive stellar death hypothesis less likely. A more plausible explanation appears to be the tidal disruption of a sun-like star by the central super-massive black hole. We argue that this transient likely belongs to a class of super-Eddington tidal disruption events.
  • We present the optical luminosity function (LF) of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) estimated from a uniform sample of 58 GRBs from observations with the Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment III (ROTSE-III). Our GRB sample is divided into two sub-samples: detected afterglows (18 GRBs), and those with upper limits (40 GRBs). The $R$ band fluxes 100s after the onset of the burst for these two sub-samples are derived. The optical LFs at 100s are fitted by assuming that the co-moving GRB rate traces the star-formation rate. The detection function of ROTSE-III is taken into account during the fitting of the optical LFs by using Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the cumulative distribution of optical emission at 100s is well-described with an exponential rise and power-law decay (ERPLD), broken power-law (BPL), and Schechter LFs. A single power-law (SPL) LF, on the other hand, is ruled out with high confidence.
  • We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of SN 2012ap, a broad-lined Type Ic supernova in the galaxy NGC 1729 that produced a relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflow without a gamma-ray burst signature. Photometry and spectroscopy follow the flux evolution from -13 to +272 days past the B-band maximum of -17.4 +/- 0.5 mag. The spectra are dominated by Fe II, O I, and Ca II absorption lines at ejecta velocities of 20,000 km/s that change slowly over time. Other spectral absorption lines are consistent with contributions from photospheric He I, and hydrogen may also be present at higher velocities (> 27,000 km/s). We use these observations to estimate explosion properties and derive a total ejecta mass of 2.7 Msolar, a kinetic energy of 1.0x10^{52} erg, and a 56Ni mass of 0.1-0.2 Msolar. Nebular spectra (t > 200d) exhibit an asymmetric double-peaked [OI] 6300,6364 emission profile that we associate with absorption in the supernova interior, although toroidal ejecta geometry is an alternative explanation. SN 2012ap joins SN 2009bb as another exceptional supernova that shows evidence for a central engine (e.g., black-hole accretion or magnetar) capable of launching a non-negligible portion of ejecta to relativistic velocities without a coincident gamma-ray burst detection. Defining attributes of their progenitor systems may be related to notable properties including above-average environmental metallicities of Z > Zsolar, moderate to high levels of host-galaxy extinction (E(B-V) > 0.4 mag), detection of high-velocity helium at early epochs, and a high relative flux ratio of [Ca II]/[O I] > 1 at nebular epochs. These events support the notion that jet activity at various energy scales may be present in a wide range of supernovae.
  • We present optical and near infrared (NIR) observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J. Seventeen optical and twenty-three NIR spectra were obtained from 10 days before ($-$10d) to 10 days after (+10d) the time of maximum $B$-band brightness. The relative strengths of absorption features and their patterns of development can be compared at one day intervals throughout most of this period. Carbon is not detected in the optical spectra, but we identify CI $\lambda$ 1.0693 in the NIR spectra. We find that MgII lines with high oscillator strengths have higher initial velocities than other MgII lines. We show that the velocity differences can be explained by differences in optical depths due to oscillator strengths. The spectra of SN 2014J show it is a normal SN Ia, but many parameters are near the boundaries between normal and high-velocity subclasses. The velocities for OI, MgII, SiII, SII, CaII and FeII suggest that SN 2014J has a layered structure with little or no mixing. That result is consistent with the delayed detonation explosion models. We also report photometric observations, obtained from $-$10d to +29d, in the $UBVRIJH$ and $K_s$ bands. SN 2014J is about 3 magnitudes fainter than a normal SN Ia at the distance of M82, which we attribute to extinction in the host. The template fitting package SNooPy is used to interpret the light curves and to derive photometric parameters. Using $R_V$ = 1.46, which is consistent with previous studies, SNooPy finds that $A_V = 1.80$ for $E(B-V)_{host}=1.23 \pm 0.01$ mag. The maximum $B$-band brightness of $-19.19 \pm 0.10$ mag was reached on February 1.74 UT $ \pm 0.13$ days and the supernova had a decline parameter of $\Delta m_{15}=1.11 \pm 0.02$ mag.
  • The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features observed in optical and near-infrared spectra that are thought to be associated with carbon-rich polyatomic molecules in interstellar gas. However, because the central wavelengths of these bands do not correspond with electronic transitions of any known atomic or molecular species, their nature has remained uncertain since their discovery almost a century ago. Here we report on unusually strong DIBs in optical spectra of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova SN 2012ap that exhibit changes in equivalent width over short (~30 days) timescales. The 4428 and 6283 Angstrom DIB features get weaker with time, whereas the 5780 Angstrom feature shows a marginal increase. These nonuniform changes suggest that the supernova is interacting with a nearby source of the DIBs and that the DIB carriers possess high ionization potentials, such as small cations or charged fullerenes. We conclude that moderate-resolution spectra of supernovae with DIB absorptions obtained within weeks of outburst could reveal unique information about the mass-loss environment of their progenitor systems and provide new constraints on the properties of DIB carriers.
  • We study the effects of rotation on the dynamics, energetics and Ni-56 production of Pair Instability Supernova explosions by performing rotating two-dimensional ("2.5-D") hydrodynamics simulations. We calculate the evolution of eight low metallicity (Z = 10^-3, 10^-4 Zsun) massive (135-245 Msun) PISN progenitors with initial surface rotational velocities 50% that of the critical Keplerian value using the stellar evolution code MESA. We allow for both the inclusion and the omission of the effects of magnetic fields in the angular momentum transport and in chemical mixing, resulting in slowly-rotating and rapidly-rotating final carbon-oxygen cores, respectively. Increased rotation for carbon-oxygen cores of the same mass and chemical stratification leads to less energetic PISN explosions that produce smaller amounts of Ni-56 due to the effect of the angular momentum barrier that develops and slows the dynamical collapse. We find a non-monotonic dependence of Ni-56 production on rotational velocity in situations when smoother composition gradients form at the outer edge of the rotating cores. In these cases, the PISN energetics are determined by the competition of two factors: the extent of chemical mixing in the outer layers of the core due to the effects of rotation in the progenitor evolution and the development of angular momentum support against collapse. Our 2.5-D PISN simulations with rotation are the first presented in the literature. They reveal hydrodynamic instabilities in several regions of the exploding star and increased explosion asymmetries with higher core rotational velocity.
  • We present fits of generalized semi-analytic supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs including Ni-56 and Co-56 radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and forward and reverse shock heating due to supernova ejecta-circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We apply our models to the observed LCs of the H-rich Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSN-II) SN 2006gy, SN 2006tf, SN 2008am, SN 2008es, CSS100217, the H-poor SLSN-I SN 2005ap, SCP06F6, SN 2007bi, SN 2010gx and SN 2010kd as well as to the interacting SN 2008iy and PTF09uj. Our goal is to determine the dominant mechanism that powers the LCs of these extraordinary events and the physical conditions involved in each case. We also present a comparison of our semi-analytical results with recent results from numerical radiation hydrodynamics calculations in the particular case of SN 2006gy in order to explore the strengths and weaknesses of our models. We find that CS shock heating produced by ejecta-CSM interaction provides a better fit to the LCs of most of the events we examine. We discuss the possibility that collision of supernova ejecta with hydrogen-deficient CSM accounts for some of the hydrogen-deficient SLSNe (SLSN-I) and may be a plausible explanation for the explosion mechanism of SN 2007bi, the pair-instability supernova (PISN) candidate. We characterize and discuss issues of parameter degeneracy.
  • We present observations of the unusual optical transient SN 2010U, including spectra taken 1.03 days to 15.3 days after maximum light that identify it as a fast and luminous Fe II type nova. Our multi-band light curve traces the fast decline (t_2 = 3.5 days) from maximum light (M_V = -10.2 mag), placing SN 2010U in the top 0.5% of the most luminous novae ever observed. We find typical ejecta velocities of approximately 1100 km/s and that SN 2010U shares many spectral and photometric characteristics with two other fast and luminous Fe II type novae, including Nova LMC 1991 and M31N-2007-11d. For the extreme luminosity of this nova, the maximum magnitude vs. rate of decline relationship indicates a massive white dwarf progenitor with a low pre-outburst accretion rate. However, this prediction is in conflict with emerging theories of nova populations, which predict that luminous novae from massive white dwarfs should preferentially exhibit an alternate spectral type (He/N) near maximum light.
  • The nearby, bright, almost completely unreddened Type Ia supernova 2011fe in M101 provides a unique opportunity to test both the precision and the accuracy of the extragalactic distances derived from SNe Ia light curve fitters. We apply the current, public versions of the independent light curve fitting codes MLCS2k2 and SALT2 to compute the distance modulus of SN 2011fe from high-precision, multi-color (BVRI) light curves. The results from the two fitting codes confirm that 2011fe is a "normal" (not peculiar) and only slightly reddened SN Ia. New unreddened distance moduli are derived as 29.21 +/- 0.07 mag (D ~ 6.95 +/- 0.23$ Mpc, MLCS2k2), and 29.05 +/- 0.07 mag (6.46 +/- 0.21 Mpc, SALT2). Despite the very good fitting quality achieved with both light curve fitters, the resulting distance moduli are inconsistent by 2 sigma. Both are marginally consistent (at ~1 sigma) with the HST Key Project distance modulus for M101. The SALT2 distance is in good agreement with the recently revised Cepheid- and TRGB-distance to M101. Averaging all SN- and Cepheid-based estimates, the absolute distance to M101 is ~6.6 +/- 0.5 Mpc.
  • We performed optical spectropolarimetric observations of the subluminous Type Ia SN2005ke at 3 epochs (days -8, -7, and +76). The explosion properties are derived by comparing the data to explosion and radiation transfer models. The SN shows polarimetric properties that are very similar to the only other subluminous event for which spectropolarimetry is available, i.e. SN1999by. The data present a very marked dominant axis, which is shared by both the continuum and lines such as SiII 6355, suggesting that the relatively large, global asymmetry is common to the photosphere and the line-forming region. The maximum polarization degree observed in the SiII 6355 absorption reaches 0.39+/-0.08%. At variance with what is seen in core-normal Type Ia, SN2005ke displays significant continuum polarization, which grows from the blue to the red and peaks at about 7000 A, reaching ~0.7%. The properties of the polarization and flux spectra can be understood within the framework of a subluminous delayed-detonation (DD), or pulsating DD scenario, or WD mergers. The difference in appearance with respect to core-normal SNe Ia is caused by low photospheric temperatures in combination with layers of unburned C, and more massive layers of the products of explosive C and O burning. The comparatively high level of continuum polarization is explained in terms of a significant global asymmetry (~15%), which is well reproduced by an oblate ellipsoidal geometry. Our results suggest that SN2005ke arose either from a single-degenerate system in which the WD is especially rapidly rotating, close to the break-up velocity, or from a double-degenerate merger. Based on the current polarization data, we cannot distinguish between these two possibilities.
  • We study SN 2006oz, a newly-recognized member of the class of H-poor, super-luminous supernovae. We present multi-color light curves from the SDSS-II SN Survey, that cover the rise time, as well as an optical spectrum that shows that the explosion occurred at z~0.376. We fitted black body functions to estimate the temperature and radius evolution of the photosphere and used the parametrized code SYNOW to model the spectrum. We constructed a bolometric light curve and compared it with explosion models. The very early light curves show a dip in the g- and r-bands and a possible initial cooling phase in the u-band before rising to maximum light. The bolometric light curve shows a precursor plateau with a duration of 6-10 days in the rest-frame. A lower limit of M_u < -21.5 can be placed on the absolute peak luminosity of the SN, while the rise time is constrained to be at least 29 days. During our observations, the emitting sphere doubled its radius to 2x10^15 cm, while the temperature remained hot at 15000 K. As for other similar SNe, the spectrum is best modeled with elements including O II and Mg II, while we tentatively suggest that Fe III might be present. We suggest that the precursor plateau might be related to a recombination wave in a circumstellar medium (CSM) and discuss whether this is a common property of all similar explosions. The subsequent rise can be equally well described by input from a magnetar or by ejecta-CSM interaction, but the models are not well constrained owing to the lack of post-maximum observations, and CSM interaction has difficulties accounting for the precursor plateau self-consistently. Radioactive decay is less likely to be the mechanism that powers the luminosity. The host galaxy, detected in deep imaging with the 10 m GTC, is a moderately young and star-forming, but not a starburst, galaxy. It has an absolute magnitude of M_g = -16.9.