• While detecting low mass exoplanets at tens of au is beyond current instrumentation, debris discs provide a unique opportunity to study the outer regions of planetary systems. Here we report new ALMA observations of the 80-200 Myr old Solar analogue HD 107146 that reveal the radial structure of its exo-Kuiper belt at wavelengths of 1.1 and 0.86 mm. We find that the planetesimal disc is broad, extending from 40 to 140 au, and it is characterised by a circular gap extending from 60 to 100 au in which the continuum emission drops by about 50%. We also report the non-detection of the CO J=3-2 emission line, confirming that there is not enough gas to affect the dust distribution. To date, HD 107146 is the only gas-poor system showing multiple rings in the distribution of millimeter sized particles. These rings suggest a similar distribution of the planetesimals producing small dust grains that could be explained invoking the presence of one or more perturbing planets. Because the disk appears axisymmetric, such planets should be on circular orbits. By comparing N-body simulations with the observed visibilities we find that to explain the radial extent and depth of the gap, it would be required the presence of multiple low mass planets or a single planet that migrated through the disc. Interior to HD 107146's exo-Kuiper belt we find extended emission with a peak at ~20 au and consistent with the inner warm belt that was previously predicted based on 22$\mu$m excess as in many other systems. This warm belt is the first to be imaged, although unexpectedly suggesting that it is asymmetric. This could be due to a large belt eccentricity or due to clumpy structure produced by resonant trapping with an additional inner planet.
  • We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) observations at an angular resolution of 0.1-0.2" of the disk surrounding the young Herbig Ae star MWC 758. The data consist of images of the dust continuum emission recorded at 0.88 millimeter, as well as images of the 13CO and C18O J = 3-2 emission lines. The dust continuum emission is characterized by a large cavity of roughly 40 au in radius which might contain a mildly inner warped disk. The outer disk features two bright emission clumps at radii of about 47 and 82 au that present azimuthal extensions and form a double-ring structure. The comparison with radiative transfer models indicates that these two maxima of emission correspond to local increases in the dust surface density of about a factor 2.5 and 6.5 for the south and north clumps, respectively. The optically thick 13CO peak emission, which traces the temperature, and the dust continuum emission, which probes the disk midplane, additionally reveal two spirals previously detected in near-IR at the disk surface. The spirals seen in the dust continuum emission present, however, a slight shift of a few au towards larger radii and one of the spirals crosses the south dust clump. Finally, we present different scenarios in order to explain the complex structure of the disk.
  • The formation of planets strongly depends on the total amount as well as on the spatial distribution of solids in protoplanetary disks. Thanks to the improvements in resolution and sensitivity provided by ALMA, measurements of the surface density of mm-sized grains are now possible on large samples of disks. Such measurements provide statistical constraints that can be used to inform our understanding of the initial conditions of planet formation. We analyze spatially resolved observations of 36 protoplanetary disks in the Lupus star forming complex from our ALMA survey at 890 micron, aiming to determine physical properties such as the dust surface density, the disk mass and size and to provide a constraint on the temperature profile. We fit the observations directly in the uv-plane using a two-layer disk model that computes the 890 micron emission by solving the energy balance at each disk radius. For 22 out of 36 protoplanetary disks we derive robust estimates of their physical properties. The sample covers stellar masses between ~0.1 and ~2 Solar masses, and we find no trend between the average disk temperatures and the stellar parameters. We find, instead, a correlation between the integrated sub-mm flux (a proxy for the disk mass) and the exponential cut-off radii (a proxy of the disk size) of the Lupus disks. Comparing these results with observations at similar angular resolution of Taurus-Auriga/Ophiuchus disks found in literature and scaling them to the same distance, we observe that the Lupus disks are generally fainter and larger at a high level of statistical significance. Considering the 1-2 Myr age difference between these regions, it is possible to tentatively explain the offset in the disk mass/disk size relation with viscous spreading, however with the current measurements other mechanisms cannot be ruled out.
  • We present ALMA observations of the 2M1207 system, a young binary made of a brown dwarf with a planetary-mass companion at a projected separation of about 40 au. We detect emission from dust continuum at 0.89 mm and from the $J = 3 - 2$ rotational transition of CO from a very compact disk around the young brown dwarf. The small radius found for this brown dwarf disk may be due to truncation from the tidal interaction with the planetary-mass companion. Under the assumption of optically thin dust emission, we estimated a dust mass of 0.1 $M_{\oplus}$ for the 2M1207A disk, and a 3$\sigma$ upper limit of $\sim 1~M_{\rm{Moon}}$ for dust surrounding 2M1207b, which is the tightest upper limit obtained so far for the mass of dust particles surrounding a young planetary-mass companion. We discuss the impact of this and other non-detections of young planetary-mass companions for models of planet formation, which predict the presence of circum-planetary material surrounding these objects.
  • We present ALMA observations of the 0.88 millimeter dust continuum, 13CO, and C18O J=3-2 line emission of the circumbinary disk HD142527 at a spatial resolution of about 0.25". This system is characterized by a large central cavity of roughly 120 AU in radius, and asymmetric dust and gas emission. By comparing the observations with theoretical models, we find that the azimuthal variations in gas and dust density reach a contrast of 54 for dust grains and 3.75 for CO molecules, with an extreme gas-to-dust ratio of 1.7 on the dust crescent. We point out that caution is required in interpreting continuum subtracted maps of the line emission as this process might result in removing a large fraction of the line emission. Radially, we find that both the gas and dust surface densities can be described by Gaussians, centered at the same disk radius, and with gas profiles wider than for the dust. These results strongly support a scenario in which millimeter dust grains are radially and azimuthally trapped toward the center of a gas pressure bump. Finally, our observations reveal a compact source of continuum and CO emission inside the dust depleted cavity at about 50 AU from the primary star. The kinematics of the CO emission from this region is different from that expected from material in Keplerian rotation around the binary system, and might instead trace a compact disk around a third companion. Higher angular resolution observations are required to investigate the nature of this source.
  • A relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central young star and the mass of the surrounding protoplanetary disk has long been theoretically predicted and observationally sought. For the first time, we have accurately and homogeneously determined the photospheric parameters, mass accretion rate, and disk mass for an essentially complete sample of young stars with disks in the Lupus clouds. Our work combines the results of surveys conducted with VLT/X-Shooter and ALMA. With this dataset we are able to test a basic prediction of viscous accretion theory, the existence of a linear relation between the mass accretion rate onto the central star and the total disk mass. We find a correlation between the mass accretion rate and the disk dust mass, with a ratio that is roughly consistent with the expected viscous timescale when assuming an interstellar medium (ISM) gas-to-dust ratio. This confirms that mass accretion rates are related to the properties of the outer disk. We find no correlation between mass accretion rates and the disk mass measured by CO isotopologues emission lines, possibly owing to the small number of measured disk gas masses. This suggests that the mm-sized dust mass better traces the total disk mass and that masses derived from CO may be underestimated, at least in some cases.
  • To characterize the mechanisms of planet formation it is crucial to investigate the properties and evolution of protoplanetary disks around young stars, where the initial conditions for the growth of planets are set. Our goal is to study grain growth in the disk of the young, intermediate mass star HD163296 where dust processing has already been observed, and to look for evidence of growth by ice condensation across the CO snowline, already identified in this disk with ALMA. Under the hypothesis of optically thin emission we compare images at different wavelengths from ALMA and VLA to measure the opacity spectral index across the disk and thus the maximum grain size. We also use a Bayesian tool based on a two-layer disk model to fit the observations and constrain the dust surface density. The measurements of the opacity spectral index indicate the presence of large grains and pebbles ($\geq$1 cm) in the inner regions of the disk (inside $\sim$50 AU) and smaller grains, consistent with ISM sizes, in the outer disk (beyond 150 AU). Re-analysing ALMA Band 7 Science Verification data we find (radially) unresolved excess continuum emission centered near the location of the CO snowline at $\sim$90 AU. Our analysis suggests a grain size distribution consistent with an enhanced production of large grains at the CO snowline and consequent transport to the inner regions. Our results combined with the excess in infrared scattered light found by Garufi et al. (2014) suggests the presence of a structure at 90~AU involving the whole vertical extent of the disk. This could be evidence for small scale processing of dust at the CO snowline.
  • In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional and debris disks) collected from the {\it Spitzer} archive. We focus on the two brighter {H~{\sc i}} lines observed in the {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) at 12.37$\mu$m and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) at 11.32$\mu$m. We detect the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in 46 objects, and the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in {\it Spitzer} spectra, the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} at 12.81$\mu$m. We argue that it is unlikely that the {H~{\sc i}} emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the {[Ne~{\sc iii}]} lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the {H~{\sc i}}(9-7)/{H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10$^{10}$-10$^{11}$~cm$^{-3}$. The subsample of objects surrounded by full and transitional disks show a positive correlation between the accretion luminosity and the {H~{\sc i}} line luminosity. These two results suggest that the observed mid-IR {H~{\sc i}} lines trace gas accreting onto the star in the same way as other hydrogen recombination lines at shorter wavelengths. A pure chromospheric origin of these lines can be excluded for the vast majority of full and transitional disks.We report for the first time the detection of the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line in eight young (< 20~Myr) debris disks. A pure chromospheric origin cannot be ruled out in these objects. If the {H~{\sc i}}(7-6) line traces accretion in these older systems, as in the case of full and transitional disks, the strength of the emission implies accretion rates lower than 10$^{-10}$M$_{\odot}$/yr. We discuss some advantages of extending accretion indicators to longer wavelengths.
  • We present the discovery, classification, and extensive panchromatic (from radio to X-ray) follow-up observations of PTF11qcj, a supernova discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory. PTF11qcj is located at a distance of dL ~ 124 Mpc. Our observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that this event is radio-loud: PTF11qcj reached a radio peak luminosity comparable to that of the famous gamma-ray-burst-associated supernova 1998bw (L_{5GHz} ~ 10^{29} erg/s/Hz). PTF11qcj is also detected in X-rays with the Chandra observatory, and in the infrared band with Spitzer. Our multi-wavelength analysis probes the supernova interaction with circumstellar material. The radio observations suggest a progenitor mass-loss rate of ~10^{-4} Msun/yr x (v_w/1000 km/s), and a velocity of ~(0.3-0.5)c for the fastest moving ejecta (at ~10d after explosion). However, these estimates are derived assuming the simplest model of supernova ejecta interacting with a smooth circumstellar material characterized by radial power-law density profile, and do not account for possible inhomogeneities in the medium and asphericity of the explosion. The radio light curve shows deviations from such a simple model, as well as a re-brightening at late times. The X-ray flux from PTF11qcj is compatible with the high-frequency extrapolation of the radio synchrotron emission (within the large uncertainties). An IR light echo from pre-existing dust is in agreement with our infrared data. Our analysis of pre-explosion data from the Palomar Transient Factory suggests that a precursor eruption of absolute magnitude M_r ~ -13 mag may have occurred ~ 2.5 yr prior to the supernova explosion. Based on our panchromatic follow-up campaign, we conclude that PTF11qcj fits the expectations from the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star. Precursor eruptions may be a feature characterizing the final pre-explosion evolution of such stars.
  • We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of GRBs 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-infrared limits establish both bursts as "dark". Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z < 4 (110709B) and 1.8 < z < 2.7 (111215A). Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A_V > 5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A_V > 8.5 mag (z=2), among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to-date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities (N_H > 10^22/cm^2; z=2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E_gamma+E_K ~ 7-9 x 10^51 erg (z=2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density (n~100-350 cm^-3 at 10^17 cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in determining the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.
  • We report results of tests of the MISANS technique at the CG-1D beamline at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A chopper at 40 Hz simulated a pulsed neutron source at the beamline. A compact turn-key MISANS module operating with the pulsed beam was installed and a well characterised MnSi sample was tested. The feasibility of application of high magnetic fields at the sample position was also explored. These tests demonstrate the great potential of this technique, in particular for examining magnetic and depolarizing samples, under extreme sample environments at pulsed sources, such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) or the planned European Spallation Source (ESS).
  • We present Herschel-SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) and radio follow-up observations of two Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) detected strongly lensed distant galaxies. In one of the targeted galaxies H-ATLAS J090311.6+003906 (SDP.81) we detect [OIII] 88\mum and [CII] 158\mum lines at a signal-to-noise ratio of ~5. We do not have any positive line identification in the other fainter target H-ATLAS J091305.0-005343 (SDP.130). Currently SDP.81 is the faintest sub-mm galaxy with positive line detections with the FTS, with continuum flux just below 200 mJy in the 200-600 \mum wavelength range. The derived redshift of SDP.81 from the two detections is z=3.043 +/-0.012, in agreement with ground-based CO measurements. This is the first detection by Herschel of the [OIII] 88\mum line in a galaxy at redshift higher than 0.05. Comparing the observed lines and line ratios with a grid of photo-dissociation region (PDR) models with different physical conditions, we derive the PDR cloud density n ~ 2000 cm^{-3} and the far-UV ionizing radiation field G_0 ~ 200 (in units of the Habing field -- the local Galactic interstellar radiation field of 1.6x10^{-6} W/m^2). Using the CO derived molecular mass and the PDR properties we estimate the effective radius of the emitting region to be 500-700 pc. These characteristics are typical for star-forming, high redshift galaxies. The radio observations indicate that SDP.81 deviates significantly from the local FIR/radio correlation, which hints that some fraction of the radio emission is coming from an AGN. The constraints on the source size from millimiter-wave observations put a very conservative upper limit of the possible AGN contribution to less than 33%. These indications, together with the high [OIII]/FIR ratio and the upper limit of [OI] 63\mum/[CII] 158\mum suggest that some fraction of the ionizing radiation is likely to originate from an AGN.
  • We present 1" resolution CARMA observations of the 3mm continuum and 95 GHz methanol masers toward 14 candidate high mass protostellar objects (HMPOs). Dust continuum emission is detected toward seven HMPOs, and methanol masers toward 5 sources. The 3mm continuum sources have diameters < 2x10^4 AU, masses between 21 and 1200 M_sun, and volume densities > 10^8 cm^-3. Most of the 3mm continuum sources are spatially coincident with compact HII regions and/or water masers, and are presumed to be formation sites of massive stars. A strong correlation exists between the presence of 3mm continuum emission, 22 GHz water masers, and 95 GHz methanol masers. However, no 3mm continuum emission is detected toward ultracompact HII regions lacking maser emission. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that 22 GHz water masers and methanol masers are signposts of an early phase in the evolution of an HMPO before an expanding HII region destroys the accretion disk.
  • We report on near-infrared (IR) interferometric observations of the double-lined pre-main sequence (PMS) binary system DQ Tau. We model these data with a visual orbit for DQ Tau supported by the spectroscopic orbit & analysis of \citet{Mathieu1997}. Further, DQ Tau exhibits significant near-IR excess; modeling our data requires inclusion of near-IR light from an 'excess' source. Remarkably the excess source is resolved in our data, similar in scale to the binary itself ($\sim$ 0.2 AU at apastron), rather than the larger circumbinary disk ($\sim$ 0.4 AU radius). Our observations support the \citet{Mathieu1997} and \citet{Carr2001} inference of significant warm material near the DQ Tau binary.
  • We determine an absolute calibration for the MIPS 24 microns band and recommend adjustments to the published calibrations for 2MASS, IRAC, and IRAS photometry to put them on the same scale. We show that consistent results are obtained by basing the calibration on either an average A0V star spectral energy distribution (SED), or by using the absolutely calibrated SED of the sun in comparison with solar-type stellar photometry (the solar analog method). After the rejection of a small number of stars with anomalous SEDs (or bad measurements), upper limits of ~ 1.5% (rms) are placed on the intrinsic infrared SED variations in both A dwarf and solar-type stars. These types of stars are therefore suitable as general-purpose standard stars in the infrared. We provide absolutely calibrated SEDs for a standard zero magnitude A star and for the sun to allow extending this work to any other infrared photometric system. They allow the recommended calibration to be applied from 1 to 25 microns with an accuracy of ~2 %, and with even higher accuracy at specific wavelengths such as 2.2, 10.6, and 24 microns, near which there are direct measurements. However, we confirm earlier indications that Vega does not behave as a typical A0V star between the visible and the infrared, making it problematic as the defining star for photometric systems. The integration of measurements of the sun with those of solar-type stars also provides an accurate estimate of the solar SED from 1 through 30 microns, which we show agrees with theoretical models.
  • This paper is one in a series presenting results obtained within the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (FEPS) Legacy Science Program on the Spitzer Space Telescope. Here we present a study of dust processing and growth in seven protoplanetary disks. Our spectra indicate that the circumstellar silicate dust grains have grown to sizes at least 10 times larger than observed in the interstellar medium, and show evidence for a non-negligible (~5 % in mass fractions) contribution from crystalline species. These results are similar to those of other studies of protoplanetary disks. In addition, we find a correlation between the strength of the amorphous silicate feature and the shape of the spectral energy distribution. This latter result is consistent with the growth and subsequent gravitational settling of dust grains towards the disk mid-plane. Further, we find a change in the relative abundance of the different crystalline species: more enstatite relative to forsterite is observed in the inner warm dust population at ~1 AU, while forsterite dominates in the colder outer regions at ~5 to 15 AU. This change in the relative abundances argues for a localized crystallization process rather than a radial mixing scenario where crystalline silicates are being transported outwards from a single formation region in the hot inner parts of the disk. Last, we report the detection of emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules in five out of seven sources. We find a tentative PAH band at 8.2 micron, previously undetected in the spectra of disks around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars.
  • We have analyzed HST/NICMOS2 F110W, F160W, F165M, and F207M band images covering the central 1'x1' of the cluster associated with Mon R2 in order to constrain the Initial Mass Function (IMF) down to 20 Mjup. The flux ratio between the F165M and F160W bands was used to measure the strength of the water band absorption feature and select a sample of 12 out of the total sample of 181 objects that have effective temperatures between 2700 K and 3300 K. These objects are placed in the HR diagram together with sources observed by Carpenter et al. (1997) to estimate an age of ~1 Myr for the low mass cluster population. By constructing extinction limited samples, we are able to constrain the IMF and the fraction of stars with a circumstellar disk in a sample that is 90% complete for both high and low mass objects. For stars with estimated masses between 0.1 Msun and 1.0 Msun for a 1 Myr population with Av < 19 mag, we find that 27+-9% have a near-infrared excess indicative of a circumstellar disk. The derived fraction is similar to, or slightly lower than, the fraction found in other star forming regions of comparable age. We constrain the number of stars in the mass interval 0.08-1.0Msun to the number of objects in the mass interval 0.02-0.08 Msun by forming the ratio, R**=N(0.08-1Msun)/N(0.02-0.08Msun) for objects in an extinction limited sample complete for Av < 7 mag. The ratio is found to be R^**=2.2+-1.3 assuming an age of 1 Myr, consistent with the similar ratio predicted by the system IMF proposed by Chabrier (2003). The ratio is similar to the ratios observed towards the Orion Nebula Cluster and IC 348 as well as the ratio derived in the 28 square degree survey of Taurus by Guieu et al. (2006).
  • Fluxes and upper limits in the wavelength range from 3.6 to 70 microns from the Spitzer Space Telescope are provided for twenty solar-mass Pleiades members. One of these stars shows a probable mid-IR excess and two others have possible excesses, presumably due to circumstellar debris disks. For the star with the largest, most secure excess flux at MIPS wavelengths, HII1101, we derive Log(L[dust]/L[Sun]) ~ -3.8 and an estimated debris disk mass of 4.2 x 10^-5 M(Earth) for an assumed uniform dust grain size of 10 microns If the stars with detected excesses are interpreted as stars with relatively recent, large collision events producing a transient excess of small dust particles, the frequency of such disk transients is about ~ 10 % for our ~ 100 Myr, Pleiades G dwarf sample. For the stars without detected 24-70 micron excesses, the upper limits to their fluxes correspond to approximate 3 sigma upper limits to their disk masses of 6 x 10^-6 M(Earth) using the MIPS 24 micron upper limit, or 2 x 10^-4 M(Earth) using the MIPS 70 micron limit. These upper limit disk masses (for "warm" and "cold" dust, respectively) are roughly consistent, but somewhat lower than, predictions of a heuristic model for the evolution of an "average" solar-mass star's debris disk based on extrapolation backwards in time from current properties of the Sun's Kuiper belt.
  • An increased data sample of identified secondary muons is collected at detection level. Project GRAND identifies secondary cosmic ray muons from electrons utilizing a thin steel absorber and tracking (PWC) chambers. The resulting angular resolution for the primary is about +/- 5 degrees. Since there is a 1.5% probability that a 100 GeV gamma primary will produce a single muon track at ground level, the high statistics allows a search for angular enhancements due to gammas. More than 100 billion muons are identified and analyzed. A table of stellar sources is examined.
  • The high energy gamma ray sources provided by experiment EGRET on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory are examined, testing Project GRAND's ability to detect primary gamma rays by means of studying secondary muons. There is ~1.5% chance that a 100 GeV primary cosmic gamma ray will produce a muon at detection level (Fasso & Poirier, 1999), a probability which increases with increasing gamma energy. Project GRAND has 80 square meters of muon detector which identifies secondary muons >0.1 GeV and measures their angles to 0.26 deg (projected angle in the XZ and YZ planes). Data taken during the last two years are analyzed. A table of EGRET's gamma ray sources is examined (The Third EGRET Catalog of High Energy Gamma Ray Sources (EGRET webpage, 1999). EGRET's flux (>0.1 GeV), angular information, and spectral index were extrapolated to GRAND's energy region (>30 GeV). Then the geometrical acceptance was calculated for each of these events. Thus, GRAND's sensitivity to each of EGRET's sources was predicted. A product of extrapolated flux and GRAND's detection sensitivity yields an overall parameter indicating GRAND's relative sensitivity to each source, assuming an energy dependence given by EGRET's spectral index. The 14 sources with the best extrapolated detection efficiency were selected to be examined with the data.
  • Project GRAND presents the results of a search for coincident high-energy gamma ray events in the direction and at the time of nine Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by BATSE. A gamma ray has a non-negligible hadron production cross section; for each gamma ray of energy of 100 GeV, there are 0.015 muons which reach detection level (Fasso & Poirier, 1999). These muons are identified and their angles are measured in stations of eight planes of proportional wire chambers (PWCs). A 50 mm steel plate above the bottom pair of planes is used to distinguish muons from electrons. The mean angular resolution is 0.26 degrees over a +/- 61 degree range in the XZ and YZ planes. The BATSE GRB catalogue is examined for bursts which are near zenith for Project GRAND. The geometrical acceptance is calculated for each of these events. The product is then taken of the GRB flux and GRAND's geometrical acceptance. The nine sources with the best combination of detection efficiency and BATSE's intensity are selected to be examined in the data. The most significant detection of these nine sources is at a statistical significance of +3.7 sigma; this is also the GRB with the highest product of GRB flux and geometrical acceptance.
  • Project GRAND presents results on the atomic composition of primary cosmic rays. This is accomplished by determining the average height of primary particles that cause extensive air showers detected by Project GRAND. Particles with a larger cross sectional area, such as iron nuclei, are likely to start an extensive air shower higher in the atmosphere whereas protons, with a smaller cross section, would pass through more air before interacting and thus start showers at lower heights. Such heights can be determined by extrapolating identified muon tracks backward (upward) to determine their height of origin (Gress et al., 1997). Since muons are from the top, hadronic part of the shower, they are a good estimator for the beginning of the shower. The data for this study were taken during the previous year with 20 million shower events.
  • Project GRAND is an extensive air shower array utilizing position sensitive detectors of proportional wire chambers. The 64 detectors deployed in a field 100 m x 100 m are located at 86.2 deg W and 41.7 deg N, at 220 m above sea level. The project was completed about two years ago and has been taking data, simultaneously on two triggers: 1) multiple-hit coincidence triggers which collect data on extensive air showers, and 2) 200 Hz triggers which collect the single tracks stored in each station during the last 5 msec.