• We report the discovery of four short period extrasolar planets transiting moderately bright stars from photometric measurements of the HATSouth network coupled to additional spectroscopic and photometric follow-up observations. While the planet masses range from 0.26 to 0.90 M$_J$, the radii are all approximately a Jupiter radii, resulting in a wide range of bulk densities. The orbital period of the planets range from 2.7d to 4.7d, with HATS-43b having an orbit that appears to be marginally non-circular (e= 0.173$\pm$0.089). HATS-44 is notable for a high metallicity ([Fe/H]= 0.320$\pm$0.071). The host stars spectral types range from late F to early K, and all of them are moderately bright (13.3<V<14.4), allowing the execution of future detailed follow-up observations. HATS-43b and HATS-46b, with expected transmission signals of 2350 ppm and 1500 ppm, respectively, are particularly well suited targets for atmospheric characterisation via transmission spectroscopy.
  • Using HST/STIS, we have detected far-ultraviolet nuclear activity in the giant elliptical galaxy NGC 1399, the central and brightest galaxy in the Fornax I cluster. The source reached a maximum observed far-UV luminosity of \~1.2 x 10e39 ergs/s in January 1999. It was detectable in earlier HST archival images in 1996 (B band) but not in 1991 (V band) or 1993 (UV). It faded by a factor of ~4x by mid-2000. The source is almost certainly associated with the low luminosity AGN responsible for the radio emission in NGC 1399. The properties of the outburst are remarkably similar to the UV-bright nuclear transient discovered earlier in NGC 4552 by Renzini et al. (1995). The source is much fainter than expected from its Bondi accretion rate (estimated from Chandra high resolution X-ray images), even in the context of "radiatively inefficient accretion flow" models, and its variability also appears inconsistent with such models. High spatial resolution UV monitoring is a valuable means to study activity in nearby LLAGNs.
  • This paper concludes a series of three papers presenting ROSAT High-Resolution Imager (HRI) observations of unidentified Einstein and serendipitous ROSAT X-ray sources in the direction of the Magellanic Clouds. Accurate positions and fluxes have been measured for these sources. Optical photometry and spectroscopy were obtained to search for identifications in order to determine the physical nature of these sources. The present paper includes new data for 24 objects; identifications are given or confirmed for 30 sources. For six sources optical finding charts showing the X-ray positions are provided. The results from this program are summarized, showing the populations of luminous X-ray sources in the Magellanic Clouds are quite different from those in the Galaxy.