• Using the two large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, Horizon-AGN (H-AGN) and Horizon-noAGN (H-noAGN, no AGN feedback), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the total density profiles (dark matter + stars) at the effective radius of massive early-type galaxies (M*>10^11 Msun). We have studied the dependencies of the mass-weighted density slope gamma'_tot with the effective radius, the galaxy mass and the host halo mass at z~0.3 and found that the inclusion of AGN feedbackalways leads to a much better agreement with observational values and trends. Our analysis suggests also that the inclusion of AGN feedback favours a strong correlation between gamma'_tot and the density slope of the dark matter component while, in the absence of AGN activity, gamma'_tot is rather strongly correlated with the density slope of the stellar component. Finally, we find that gamma'_tot derived from our samples of galaxies increases from z=2 to z=0,in good agreement with the expected observational trend. The derived slopes are slightly lower than in the data when AGN is included because the simulated galaxies tend to be too extended, especially the least massive ones. However, the simulated compact galaxies without AGN feedback have gamma'_tot values that are significantly too high compared to observations.
  • The role of the cosmic web in shaping galaxy properties is investigated in the GAMA spectroscopic survey in the redshift range $0.03 \leq z \leq 0.25$. The stellar mass, $u - r$ dust corrected colour and specific star formation rate (sSFR) of galaxies are analysed as a function of their distances to the 3D cosmic web features, such as nodes, filaments and walls, as reconstructed by DisPerSE. Significant mass and type/colour gradients are found for the whole population, with more massive and/or passive galaxies being located closer to the filament and wall than their less massive and/or star-forming counterparts. Mass segregation persists among the star-forming population alone. The red fraction of galaxies increases when closing in on nodes, and on filaments regardless of the distance to nodes. Similarly, the star-forming population reddens (or lowers its sSFR) at fixed mass when closing in on filament, implying that some quenching takes place. Comparable trends are also found in the state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulation Horizon-AGN. These results suggest that on top of stellar mass and large-scale density, the traceless component of the tides from the anisotropic large-scale environment also shapes galactic properties. An extension of excursion theory accounting for filamentary tides provides a qualitative explanation in terms of anisotropic assembly bias: at a given mass, the accretion rate varies with the orientation and distance to filaments. It also explains the absence of type/colour gradients in the data on smaller, non-linear scales.
  • Using a suite of three large cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, Horizon-AGN, Horizon-noAGN (no AGN feedback) and Horizon-DM (no baryons), we investigate how a typical sub-grid model for AGN feedback affects the evolution of the inner density profiles of massive dark matter haloes and galaxies. Based on direct object-to-object comparisons, we find that the integrated inner mass and density slope differences between objects formed in these three simulations (hereafter, H_AGN, H_noAGN and H_DM) significantly evolve with time. More specifically, at high redshift (z~5), the mean central density profiles of H_AGN and H_noAGN dark matter haloes tend to be much steeper than their H_DM counterparts owing to the rapidly growing baryonic component and ensuing adiabatic contraction. By z~1.5, these mean halo density profiles in H_AGN have flattened, pummelled by powerful AGN activity ("quasar mode"): the integrated inner mass difference gaps with H_noAGN haloes have widened, and those with H_DM haloes have narrowed. Fast forward 9.5 billion years, down to z=0, and the trend reverses: H_AGN halo mean density profiles drift back to a more cusped shape as AGN feedback efficiency dwindles ("radio mode"), and the gaps in integrated central mass difference with H_noAGN and H_DM close and broaden respectively. On the galaxy side, the story differs noticeably. Averaged stellar profile central densities and inner slopes are monotonically reduced by AGN activity as a function of cosmic time, resulting in better agreement with local observations. As both dark matter and stellar inner density profiles respond quite sensitively to the presence of a central AGN, there is hope that future observational determinations of these quantities can be used constrain AGN feedback models.
  • The XXL survey currently covers two 25 sq. deg. patches with XMM observations of ~10ks. We summarise the scientific results associated with the first release of the XXL data set, that occurred mid 2016. We review several arguments for increasing the survey depth to 40 ks during the next decade of XMM operations. X-ray (z<2) cluster, (z<4) AGN and cosmic background survey science will then benefit from an extraordinary data reservoir. This, combined with deep multi-$\lambda$ observations, will lead to solid standalone cosmological constraints and provide a wealth of information on the formation and evolution of AGN, clusters and the X-ray background. In particular, it will offer a unique opportunity to pinpoint the z>1 cluster density. It will eventually constitute a reference study and an ideal calibration field for the upcoming eROSITA and Euclid missions.
  • The observed massive end of the local galaxy stellar mass function is steeper than its predicted dark matter (DM) halo counterpart in the standard $\Lambda $CDM paradigm. We investigate how active galactic nuclei (AGN) feedback can account for such a reduction in the stellar content of massive galaxies, through an influence on the gas content of their interstellar (ISM) and circum-galactic medium (CGM). We isolate the impact of AGNs by comparing two simulations from the HORIZON suite, which are identical except that one includes super massive black holes (SMBH) and related feedback. This allows us to cross-identify individual galaxies between these simulations and quantify the effect of AGN feedback on their properties, such as stellar mass and gas outflows. We find that the most massive galaxies ($ \rm M_{*} \geq 3 \times 10^{11} M_\odot $) are quenched to the extent that their stellar masses decrease by about 80% at $z=0$. More generally, SMBHs affect their host halo through a combination of outflows that reduce their baryonic mass, particularly for galaxies in the mass range $ \rm 10^9 M_\odot \leq M_{*} \leq 10^{11} M_\odot $, and a disruption of central gas inflows, which limits in-situ star formation, particularly massive galaxies with $ \rm M_{*} \approx10^{11} M_\odot $. As a result of these processes, net gas inflows onto massive galaxies drop by up to 70%. Finally, we measure a redshift evolution in the stellar mass ratio of twin galaxies with and without AGN feedback, with galaxies of a given stellar mass showing stronger signs of quenching earlier on. This evolution is driven by a progressive flattening of the $\rm M_{SMBH}-M_* $ relation for galaxies with $\rm M_{*} \leq 10^{10} M_\odot $ as redshift decreases, which translates into smaller SBMHs being harboured by galaxies of any fixed stellar mass, and indicates stronger AGN feedback at higher redshift.
  • We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~ 5E-15 erg/sec/cm2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-lambda and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-lambda associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. The XXL multi-lambda data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for cosmological and extragalactic studies and will serve as a calibration resource for future dark energy studies with clusters and other X-ray selected sources. With the present article, we release the XMM XXL photon and smoothed images along with the corresponding exposure maps. The XMM XXL observation list (Table B.1) is available in electronic form at the CDS. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey.
  • We use Horizon-AGN, a hydrodynamical cosmological simulation, to explore the role of mergers in the evolution of massive (M > 10^10 MSun) galaxies around the epoch of peak cosmic star formation (1<z<4). The fraction of massive galaxies in major mergers (mass ratio R<4:1) is around 3%, a factor of ~2.5 lower than minor mergers (4:1<R <10:1) at these epochs, with no trend with redshift. At z~1, around a third of massive galaxies have undergone a major merger, while all such systems have undergone either a major or minor merger. While almost all major mergers at z>3 are 'blue' (i.e. have significant associated star formation), the proportion of 'red' mergers increases rapidly at z<2, with most merging systems at z~1.5 producing remnants that are red in rest-frame UV-optical colours. The star formation enhancement during major mergers is mild (~20-40%) which, together with the low incidence of such events, implies that this process is not a significant driver of early stellar mass growth. Mergers (R < 10:1) host around a quarter of the total star formation budget in this redshift range, with major mergers hosting around two-thirds of this contribution. Notwithstanding their central importance to the standard LCDM paradigm, mergers are minority players in driving star formation at the epochs where the bulk of today's stellar mass was formed.
  • State-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations show that gas inflow through the virial sphere of dark matter halos is focused (i.e. has a preferred inflow direction), consistent (i.e. its orientation is steady in time) and amplified (i.e. the amplitude of its advected specific angular momentum increases with time). We explain this to be a consequence of the dynamics of the cosmic web within the neighbourhood of the halo, which produces steady, angular momentum rich, filamentary inflow of cold gas. On large scales, the dynamics within neighbouring patches drives matter out of the surrounding voids, into walls and filaments before it finally gets accreted onto virialised dark matter halos. As these walls/filaments constitute the boundaries of asymmetric voids, they acquire a net transverse motion, which explains the angular momentum rich nature of the later infall which comes from further away. We conjecture that this large-scale driven consistency explains why cold flows are so efficient at building up high redshift thin discs from the inside out.
  • We consider the Gumbel or extreme value statistics describing the distribution function p_G(x_max) of the maximum values of a random field x within patches of fixed size. We present, for smooth Gaussian random fields in two and three dimensions, an analytical estimate of p_G which is expected to hold in a regime where local maxima of the field are moderately high and weakly clustered. When the patch size becomes sufficiently large, the negative of the logarithm of the cumulative extreme value distribution is simply equal to the average of the Euler Characteristic of the field in the excursion x > x_max inside the patches. The Gumbel statistics therefore represents an interesting alternative probe of the genus as a test of non Gaussianity, e.g. in cosmic microwave background temperature maps or in three-dimensional galaxy catalogs. It can be approximated, except in the remote positive tail, by a negative Weibull type form, converging slowly to the expected Gumbel type form for infinitely large patch size. Convergence is facilitated when large scale correlations are weaker. We compare the analytic predictions to numerical experiments for the case of a scale-free Gaussian field in two dimensions, achieving impressive agreement between approximate theory and measurements. We also discuss the generalization of our formalism to non-Gaussian fields.
  • The correlation between the large-scale distribution of galaxies and their spectroscopic properties at z=1.5 is investigated using the Horizon MareNostrum cosmological run. We have extracted a large sample of 10^5 galaxies from this large hydrodynamical simulation featuring standard galaxy formation physics. Spectral synthesis is applied to these single stellar populations to generate spectra and colours for all galaxies. We use the skeleton as a tracer of the cosmic web and study how our galaxy catalogue depends on the distance to the skeleton. We show that galaxies closer to the skeleton tend to be redder, but that the effect is mostly due to the proximity of large haloes at the nodes of the skeleton, rather than the filaments themselves. This effects translate into a bimodality in the colour distribution of our sample. The origin of this bimodality is investigated and seems to follow from the ram pressure stripping of satellite galaxies within the more massive clusters of the simulation. The virtual catalogues (spectroscopical properties of the MareNostrum galaxies at various redshifts) are available online at http://www.iap.fr/users/pichon/MareNostrum/catalogues
  • Galaxy clusters are the largest structures for which there is observational evidence of a magnetised medium. Central cores seem to host strong magnetic fields ranging from a few 0.1 microG up to several 10 microG in cooling flow clusters. Numerous clusters harbor central powerful AGN which are thought to prevent cooling flows in some clusters. The influence of such feedback on the magnetic field remains unclear: does the AGN-induced turbulence compensate the loss of magnetic amplification within a cool core? And how is this turbulence sustained over several Gyr? Using high resolution magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the self-regulation of a radiative cooling cluster, we study for the first time the evolution of the magnetic field within the central core in the presence of a powerful AGN jet. It appears that the jet-induced turbulence strongly amplifies the magnetic amplitude in the core beyond the degree to which it would be amplified by pure compression in the gravitational field of the cluster. The AGN produces a non-cooling core and increases the magnetic field amplitude in good agreement with microG field observations.
  • The largest galaxies acquire their mass early on, when the Universe is still youthful. Cold streams violently feed these young galaxies a vast amount of fresh gas, resulting in very efficient star formation. Using a well resolved hydrodynamical simulation of galaxy formation, we demonstrate that these mammoth galaxies are already in place a couple of billion years after the Big Bang. Contrary to local starforming galaxies, where dust re-emits a large part of the stellar ultraviolet (UV) light at infrared and sub-millimetre wavelengths, our self-consistent modelling of dust extinction predicts that a substantial fraction of UV photons should escape from primordial galaxies. Such a model allows us to compute reliably the number of high redshift objects as a function of luminosity, and yields galaxies whose UV luminosities closely match those measured in the deepest observational surveys available. This agreement is remarkably good considering our admittedly still simple modelling of the interstellar medium (ISM) physics. The luminosity functions (LF) of virtual UV luminous galaxies coincide with the existing data over the whole redshift range from 4 to 7, provided cosmological parameters are set to their currently favoured values. Despite their considerable emission at short wavelengths, we anticipate that the counterparts of the brightest UV galaxies will be detected by future sub-millimetre facilities like ALMA
  • This paper presents MoLUSC, a new method for generating mock galaxy catalogs from a large scale ($\approx 1000^3$ Mpc$^3$) dark matter simulation, that requires only modest CPU time and memory allocation. The method uses a small-scale ($\approx 256^3$ Mpc$^3$) dark matter simulation on which the \galics semi-analytic code has been run in order to define the transformation from dark matter density to galaxy density transformation using a probabilistic treatment. MoLUSC is then applied to a large-scale dark matter simulation in order to produce a realistic distribution of galaxies and their associated spectra. This permits the fast generation of large-scale mock surveys using relatively low-resolution simulations. We describe various tests which have been conducted to validate the method, and demonstrate a first application to generate a mock Sloan Digital Sky Survey redshift survey.
  • The Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) is a second-generation VLT panoramic integral-field spectrograph under preliminary design study. MUSE has a field of 1x1 arcmin**2 sampled at 0.2x0.2 arcsec**2 and is assisted by the VLT ground layer adaptive optics ESO facility using four laser guide stars. The simultaneous spectral range is 465-930 nm, at a resolution of R~3000. MUSE couples the discovery potential of a large imaging device to the measuring capabilities of a high-quality spectrograph, while taking advantage of the increased spatial resolution provided by adaptive optics. This makes MUSE a unique and tremendously powerful instrument for discovering and characterizing objects that lie beyond the reach of even the deepest imaging surveys. MUSE has also a high spatial resolution mode with 7.5x7.5 arcsec**2 field of view sampled at 25 milli-arcsec. In this mode MUSE should be able to obtain diffraction limited data-cubes in the 600-930 nm wavelength range. Although the MUSE design has been optimized for the study of galaxy formation and evolution, it has a wide range of possible applications; e.g. monitoring of outer planets atmosphere, environment of young stellar objects, super massive black holes and active nuclei in nearby galaxies or massive spectroscopic surveys of stellar fields in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.
  • We reproduce the blue and red sequences in the observed joint distribution of colour and magnitude for galaxies at low and high redshifts using hybrid N-body/semi-analytic simulations of galaxy formation. The match of model and data is achieved by mimicking the effects of cold flows versus shock heating coupled to feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), as predicted by Dekel & Birnboim (2006). After a critical epoch z=3, only haloes below a critical shock-heating mass 10^12MSun enjoy gas supply by cold flows and form stars, while cooling and star formation are shut down abruptly above this mass. The shock-heated gas is kept hot because being dilute it is vulnerable to feedback from energetic sources such as AGNs in their self-regulated mode. The shutdown explains in detail the bright-end truncation of the blue sequence at ~L*, the appearance of luminous red-and-dead galaxies on the red sequence starting already at z~2, the colour bimodality, its strong dependence on environment density and its correlations with morphology and other galaxy properties. Before z~2-3, even haloes above the shock-heating mass form stars by cold streams penetrating through the hot gas. This explains the bright star-forming galaxies at z~3-4, the early appearance of massive galaxies on the red sequence, the high cosmological star-formation rate at high redshifts and the subsequent low rate at low redshifts.
  • The Active Galactic Nuclei In Cosmological Simulations (AGNICS) project includes AGN into the GalICS hybrid (N-body + semi-analytic) model to explore the quasar-galaxy link in a cosmological perspective. The key problems are the quasar fuelling mechanism, the origin of the BH to bulge mass relation, the causal and chronological link between BH growth and galaxy formation, the properties of quasar hosts and the role of AGN feedback in galaxy formation. This first paper has two goals: to describe the general structure and the assumptions of the method, and to apply AGNICS to studying the joint formation of BHs and spheroids in galaxy mergers. We investigate under what conditions this scenario can reproduce the local BH distribution and the evolution of the quasar population. AGNICS contains two star formation modes: a quiescent one in discs and a starburst one in protospheroids, the latter triggered by mergers and disc instabilities. We assume that BH growth is linked to the starburst mode. The simplest version of this scenario, in which the BH accretion rate and the star formation rate in the starburst component are simply related by a constant of proportionality, does not to reproduce the cosmic evolution of the quasar population. A model in which this relation is modulated by a scaling with the square root of the starburst gas density can explain the evolution of the quasar luminosity function in B-band and X-rays (accounting for the obscuration inferred from X-ray studies). The scatter and the tilt that this model introduces in the BH-to-bulge mass relation are within the observational constraints. The quasar contribution grows with bolometric luminosity and for a given bulge mass the most massive BHs are in the bulges with the oldest stars.
  • Dark Matter (DM) is generally assumed to be massive, cold and collisionless from the structure formation point of view. A more correct statement however is that DM indeed experiences collisional damping, but on a scale which is supposed to be too small to be relevant for structure formation. The aim of this paper is to present a Cold (although ``collisional'') Dark Matter particle whose matter power spectrum is damped and see whether it is distinguishable from standard candidates. To achieve this purpose, we calculate the collisional damping and free-streaming scales of neutralinos and non conventional candidates (say light particles heavier than ~1 MeV but lighter than O(10) GeV). The latter can be considered as Cold Dark Matter (CDM) particles in the sense that they become non relativistic before their thermal decoupling epoch. Unlike neutralinos, however, their linear matter power spectrum can be damped on scales of ~ 10^3 Msol due to their interactions. Since these scales are of cosmological interest for structure formation, we perform a series of numerical simulations to obtain the corresponding non linear matter power spectra P(k)_{nl} at the present epoch. We show that because of small scale regeneration, they all resemble each other at low redshifts, i.e. become very similar to a typical CDM matter power spectrum on all but the smallest scales. Therefore, even if lensing measurements at redshift below unity were to yield a P(k)_{nl} consistent with CDM models, this would not constitute a sufficiently robust evidence in favour of the neutralino to rule out alternative DM candidates.
  • Bottom-up hierarchical formation of dark matter haloes is not as monotonic as implicitly assumed in the Press-Schechter formalism: matter can be ejected into tidal tails, shells or low density `atmospheres'. The implications that the possible truncation of star formation in these tidal `debris' may have for observational galaxy statistics are examined here using the ArFus N-body plus semi-analytical galaxy modelling software. Upper and lower bounds on stellar losses implied by a given set of N-body simulation output data can be investigated by choice of the merging/identity criterion of haloes between successive N-body simulation output times. A median merging/identity criterion is defined and used to deduce an upper estimate of possible star formation and stellar population losses. A largest successor merging/identity criterion is defined to deduce an estimate which minimises stellar losses. In the N-body simulations studied, the debris losses are short range in length and temporary; maximum loss is around 16%. The induced losses for star formation and luminosity functions are strongest (losses of 10%-30%) for low luminosity galaxies and at intermediate redshifts (1 < z < 3). This upper bound on likely losses is smaller than present observational uncertainties. Hence, Press-Schechter based galaxy formation models are approximately valid despite ignoring loss of debris, provided that dwarf galaxy statistics are not under study.