• We present an analysis of the effect of feedback from O- and B-type stars with data from the integral field spectrograph MUSE mounted on the Very Large Telescope of pillar-like structures in the Carina Nebular Complex, one of the most massive star-forming regions in the Galaxy. For the observed pillars, we compute gas electron densities and temperatures maps, produce integrated line and velocity maps of the ionised gas, study the ionisation fronts at the pillar tips, analyse the properties of the single regions, and detect two ionised jets originating from two distinct pillar tips. For each pillar tip we determine the incident ionising photon flux $Q_\mathrm{0,pil}$ originating from the nearby massive O- and B-type stars and compute the mass-loss rate $\dot{M}$ of the pillar tips due to photo-evaporation caused by the incident ionising radiation. We combine the results of the Carina data set with archival MUSE data of a pillar in NGC 3603 and with previously published MUSE data of the Pillars of Creation in M16, and with a total of 10 analysed pillars, find tight correlations between the ionising photon flux and the electron density, the electron density and the distance from the ionising sources, and the ionising photon flux and the mass-loss rate. The combined MUSE data sets of pillars in regions with different physical conditions and stellar content therefore yield an empirical quantification of the feedback effects of ionising radiation. In agreement with models, we find that $\dot{M}\propto Q_\mathrm{0,pil}^{1/2}$.
  • Using spectral-line observations of HNCO, N2H+, and HNC, we investigate the kinematics of dense gas in the central ~250 pc of the Galaxy. We present SCOUSE (Semi-automated multi-COmponent Universal Spectral-line fitting Engine), a line fitting algorithm designed to analyse large volumes of spectral-line data efficiently and systematically. Unlike techniques which do not account for complex line profiles, SCOUSE accurately describes the {l, b, v_LSR} distribution of CMZ gas, which is asymmetric about Sgr A* in both position and velocity. Velocity dispersions range from 2.6 km/s<\sigma<53.1 km/s. A median dispersion of 9.8 km/s, translates to a Mach number, M_3D>28. The gas is distributed throughout several "streams", with projected lengths ~100-250 pc. We link the streams to individual clouds and sub-regions, including Sgr C, the 20 and 50 km/s clouds, the dust ridge, and Sgr B2. Shell-like emission features can be explained by the projection of independent molecular clouds in Sgr C and the newly identified conical profile of Sgr B2 in {l ,b, v_LSR} space. These features have previously invoked supernova-driven shells and cloud-cloud collisions as explanations. We instead caution against structure identification in velocity-integrated emission maps. Three geometries describing the 3-D structure of the CMZ are investigated: i) two spiral arms; ii) a closed elliptical orbit; iii) an open stream. While two spiral arms and an open stream qualitatively reproduce the gas distribution, the most recent parameterisation of the closed elliptical orbit does not. Finally, we discuss how proper motion measurements of masers can distinguish between these geometries, and suggest that this effort should be focused on the 20 km/s and 50 km/s clouds and Sgr C.
  • A nebular analysis of the central Orion Nebula and its main structures is presented. We exploit MUSE integral field observations in the wavelength range 4595-9366 \r{A} to produce the first O, S and N ionic and total abundance maps of a region spanning 6' x 5' with a spatial resolution of 0.2". We use the S$_{23}$ ( = ([SII]$\lambda$6717,31+[SIII]$\lambda$9068)/H$\beta$) parameter, together with [OII]/[OIII] as an indicator of the degree of ionisation, to distinguish between the various small-scale structures. The only Orion Bullet covered by MUSE is HH 201, which shows a double component in the [FeII]$\lambda$8617 line throughout indicating an expansion, and we discuss a scenario in which this object is undergoing a disruptive event. We separate the proplyds located south of the Bright Bar into four categories depending on their S$_{23}$ values, propose the utility of the S$_{23}$ parameter as an indicator of the shock-contribution to the excitation of line-emitting atoms, and show that the MUSE data is able to identify the proplyds associated with disks and microjets. We compute the second order structure function for the H$\alpha$, [OIII]$\lambda$5007, [SII]$\lambda$6731 and [OI]$\lambda$6300 emission lines to analyse the turbulent velocity field of the region covered with MUSE. We find that the spectral and spatial resolution of MUSE is not able to faithfully reproduce the structure functions of previous works.
  • Filaments represent a key structure during the early stages of the star formation process. Simulations show filamentary structure commonly formed before and during the formation of cores. Aims. The Serpens Core represents an ideal laboratory to test the state-of-the-art of simulations of turbulent Giant Molecular Clouds. We use Herschel observations of the Serpens Core to compute temperature and column density maps of the region. Among the simulations of Dale et al. (2012), we select the early stages of their Run I, before stellar feedback is initiated, with similar total mass and physical size as the Serpens Core. We derive temperature and column density maps also from the simulations. The observed distribution of column densities of the filaments has been analysed first including and then masking the cores. The same analysis has been performed on the simulations as well. A radial network of filaments has been detected in the Serpens Core. The analysed simulation shows a striking morphological resemblance to the observed structures. The column density distribution of simulated filaments without cores shows only a log-normal distribution, while the observed filaments show a power-law tail. The power-law tail becomes evident in the simulation if one focuses just on the column density distribution of the cores. In contrast, the observed cores show a flat distribution. Even though the simulated and observed filaments are subjectively similar-looking, we find that they behave in very different ways. The simulated filaments are turbulence-dominated regions, the observed filaments are instead self-gravitating structures that will probably fragment into cores.
  • We investigate the longevity of broad bridge features in position-velocity diagrams that appear as a result of cloud-cloud collisions. Broad bridges will have a finite lifetime due to the action of feedback, conversion of gas into stars and the timescale of the collision. We make a series of analytic arguments with which to estimate these lifetimes. Our simple analytic arguments suggest that for collisions between clouds larger than R~10 pc the lifetime of the broad bridge is more likely to be determined by the lifetime of the collision rather than the radiative or wind feedback disruption timescale. However for smaller clouds feedback becomes much more effective. This is because the radiative feedback timescale scales with the ionising flux Nly as R^{7/4}Nly^{-1/4} so a reduction in cloud size requires a relatively large decrease in ionising photons to maintain a given timescale. We find that our analytic arguments are consistent with new synthetic observations of numerical simulations of cloud-cloud collisions (including star formation and radiative feedback). We also argue that if the number of observable broad bridges remains ~ constant, then the disruption timescale must be roughly equivalent to the collision rate. If this is the case our analytic arguments also provide collision rate estimates, which we find are readily consistent with previous theoretical models at the scales they consider (clouds larger than about 10 pc) but are much higher for smaller clouds.
  • We examine the combined effects of winds and photoionizing radiation from O--type stars on embedded stellar clusters formed in model turbulent molecular clouds covering a range of masses and radii. We find that feedback is able to increase the quantities of dense gas present, but decreases the rate and efficiency of the conversion of gas to stars relative to control simulations in which feedback is absent. Star formation in these calculations often proceeds at a rate substantially slower than the freefall rate in the dense gas. This decoupling is due to the weakening of, and expulsion of gas from, the deepest parts of the clouds' potential wells where most of the star formation occurs in the control simulations. This results in large fractions of the stellar populations in the feedback simulation becoming dissociated from dense gas. However, where star formation \emph{does} occur in both control and feedback simulations, it does so in dense gas, so the correlation between star formation activity and dense gas is preserved. The overall dynamical effects of feedback on the \emph{clusters} are minimal, with only small fraction of stars becoming unbound, despite large quantities of gas being expelled from some clouds. This owes to the settling of the stars into virialised and stellar--dominated configurations before the onset of feedback. By contrast, the effects of feedback on the observable properties of the clusters -- their U--, B-- and V--band magnitudes -- are strong and sudden. The timescales on which the clusters become visible and unobscured are short compared with the timescales which the clouds are actually destroyed.
  • Integral field unit (IFU) data of the iconic Pillars of Creation in M16 are presented. The ionisation structure of the pillars was studied in great detail over almost the entire visible wavelength range, and maps of the relevant physical parameters, e.g. extinction, electron density, electron temperature, line-of-sight velocity of the ionised and neutral gas are shown. In agreement with previous authors, we find that the pillar tips are being ionised and photo-evaporated by the massive members of the nearby cluster NGC 6611. They display a stratified ionisation structure where the emission lines peak in a descending order according to their ionisation energies. The IFU data allowed us to analyse the kinematics of the photo-evaporative flow in terms of the stratified ionisation structure, and we find that, in agreement with simulations, the photo-evaporative flow is traced by a blueshift in the position-velocity profile. The gas kinematics and ionisation structure have allowed us to produce a sketch of the 3D geometry of the Pillars, positioning the pillars with respect to the ionising cluster stars. We use a novel method to detect a previously unknown bipolar outflow at the tip of the middle pillar and suggest that it has an embedded protostar as its driving source. Furthermore we identify a candidate outflow in the leftmost pillar. With the derived physical parameters and ionic abundances, we estimate a mass loss rate due to the photo-evaporative flow of 70 M$_{\odot}$ Myr$^{-1}$ which yields an expected lifetime of approximately 3 Myr.
  • Collisions between giant molecular clouds are a potential mechanism for triggering the formation of massive stars, or even super star clusters. The trouble is identifying this process observationally and distinguishing it from other mechanisms. We produce synthetic position-velocity diagrams from models of: cloud-cloud collisions, non-interacting clouds along the line of sight, clouds with internal radiative feedback and a more complex cloud evolving in a galactic disc, to try and identify unique signatures of collision. We find that a broad bridge feature connecting two intensity peaks, spatially correlated but separated in velocity, is a signature of a high velocity cloud-cloud collision. We show that the broad bridge feature is resilient to the effects of radiative feedback, at least to around 2.5Myr after the formation of the first massive (ionising) star. However for a head on 10km/s collision we find that this will only be observable from 20-30 per cent of viewing angles. Such broad-bridge features have been identified towards M20, a very young region of massive star formation that was concluded to be a site of cloud-cloud collision by Torii et al (2011), and also towards star formation in the outer Milky Way by Izumi et al (2014).
  • We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of sixty--seven observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O--type stars performed by Dale et al (2012a, b, 2013a, b, 2014). We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of two at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback--driven structures in terms of triggering.
  • Aims. We investigate the effects of ionising photons on accretion and stellar mass growth in a young star forming region, using a Monte Carlo radiation transfer code coupled to a smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulation. Methods. We introduce the framework with which we correct stellar cluster masses for the effects of photoionising (PI) feedback and compare to the results of a full ionisation hydrodynamics code. Results. We present results of our simulations of star formation in the spiral arm of a disk galaxy, including the effects of photoionising radiation from high mass stars. We find that PI feedback reduces the total mass accreted onto stellar clusters by approximately 23 per cent over the course of the simulation and reduces the number of high mass clusters, as well as the maximum mass attained by a stellar cluster. Mean star formation rates (SFRs) drop from 0.042 solar masses per year in our control run to 0.032 solar masses per year after the inclusion of PI feedback with a final instantaneous SFR reduction of 62 per cent. The overall cluster mass distribution appears to be affected little by PI feedback. Conclusions. We compare our results to the observed extra-galactic Schmidt-Kennicutt relation and the observed properties of local star forming regions in the Milky Way and find that internal photoionising (PI) feedback is unlikely to reduce star formation rates by more than a factor of approximately 2 and thus may play only a minor role in regulating star formation.
  • Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs) are observed to be turbulent, but theory shows that without a driving mechanism turbulence should quickly decay. The question arises by which mechanisms turbulence is driven or sustained. It has been shown that photoionising feedback from massive stars has an impact on the surrounding GMC and can for example create vast HII bubbles. We therefore address the question of whether turbulence is a consequence of this effect of feedback on the cloud. To investigate this, we analyse the velocity field of simulations of high mass star forming regions by studying velocity structure functions and power spectra. We find that clouds whose morphology is strongly affected by photoionising feedback also show evidence of driving of turbulence by preserving or recovering a Kolmogorov-type velocity field. On the contrary, control run simulations without photoionising feedback have a velocity distribution that bears the signature of gravitational collapse and of the dissipation of energy, where the initial Kolmogorov-type structure function is erased.
  • We model the combined effects of photoionization and momentum--driven winds from O--stars on molecular clouds spanning a parameter space of initial conditions. The dynamical effects of the winds are very modest. However, in the lower--mass clouds, they influence the morphologies of the HII regions by creating 10pc--scale central cavities.\\ The inhomogeneous structures of the model GMCs make them highly permeable to photons, ionized gas and supernova ejecta, and the leaking of ionized gas in particular strongly affects their evolution, reducing the effectiveness of feedback. Nevertheless, feedback is able to expel large fractions of the mass of the lower escape--velocity clouds. Its impact on star formation is more modest, decreasing final star formation efficiencies by 10--20$\%$, and the rate of change of the star formation efficiency per freefall time by about one third. However, the clouds still form stars substantially faster than observed GMCs.
  • We examine the effect of momentum-driven OB-star stellar winds on a parameter space of simulated turbulent Giant Molecular Clouds using SPH hydrodynamical simulations. By comparison with identical simulations in which ionizing radiation was included instead of winds, we show that momentum-driven winds are considerably less effective in disrupting their host clouds than are HII regions. The wind bubbles produced are smaller and generally smoother than the corresponding ionization-driven bubbles. Winds are roughly as effective in destroying the very dense gas in which the O-stars are embedded, and thus shutting down the main regions of star-forming activity in the model clouds. However, their influence falls off rapidly with distance from the sources, so they are not as good at sweeping up dense gas and triggering star formation further out in the clouds. As a result, their effect on the star formation rate and efficiency is generally more negative than that of ionization, if they exert any effect at all.
  • We present the fourth in a series of papers detailing our SPH study of the effects of ionizing feedback from O--type stars on turbulent star forming clouds. Here, we study the effects of photoionization on a series of initially partially unbound clouds with masses ranging from $10^{4}$--$10^{6}$M$_{\odot}$ and initial sizes from 2.5-45pc. We find that ionizing feedback profoundly affects the structure of the gas in most of our model clouds, creating large and often well-cleared bubble structures and pillars. However, changes in the structures of the embedded clusters produced are much weaker and not well correlated to the evolution of the gas. We find that in all cases, star formation efficiencies and rates are reduced by feedback and numbers of objects increased, relative to control simulations. We find that local triggered star formation does occur and that there is a good correlation between triggered objects and pillars or bubble walls, but that triggered objects are often spatially-mixed with those formed spontaneously. Some triggered objects acquire large enough masses to become ionizing sources themselves, lending support to the concept of propagating star formation. We find scant evidence for spatial age gradients in most simulations, and where we do see them, they are not a good indicator of triggering, as they apply equally to spontaneously-formed objects as triggered ones. Overall, we conclude that inferring the global or local effects of feedback on stellar populations from observing a system at a single epoch is very problematic.
  • We extend our previous SPH parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range $10^{4}-10^{6}$M$_{\odot}$ with initial virial ratios $E_{\rm kin}/E_{\rm pot}$=2.3, allow them to form stars, and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3Myr timescale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fractions of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while lower-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this timescale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.
  • We present a detailed study of star formation occurring in bound star--forming clouds under the influence of internal ionizing feedback from massive stars across a spectrum of cloud properties. We infer which objects are triggered by comparing our feedback simulations with control simulations in which no feedback was present. We find feedback always results in a lower star--formation efficiency and usually but not always results in a larger number of stars or clusters. Cluster mass functions are not strongly affected by feedback, but stellar mass functions are biased towards lower masses. Ionization also affects the geometrical distribution of stars in ways that are robust against projection effects, but may make the stellar associations more or less subclustered depending on the background cloud environment. We observe a prominent pillar in one simulation which is the remains of an accretion flow feeding the central ionizing cluster of its host cloud and suggest that this may be a general formation mechanism for pillars such as those observed in M16. We find that the association of stars with structures in the gas such as shells or pillars is a good but by no means foolproof indication that those stars have been triggered and we conclude overall that it is very difficult to deduce which objects have been induced to form and which formed spontaneously simply from observing the system at a single time.
  • We present an SPH parameter study of the dynamical effect of photoionization from O--type stars on star--forming clouds of a range of masses and sizes during the time window before supernovae explode. Our model clouds all have the same degree of turbulent support initially, the ratio of turbulent kinetic energy to gravitational potential energy being set to $E_{\rm kin}/|E_{\rm pot}|$=0.7. We allow the clouds to form stars and study the dynamical effects of the ionizing radiation from the massive stars or clusters born within them. We find that dense filamentary structures and accretion flows limit the quantities of gas that can be ionized, particularly in the higher density clusters. More importantly, the higher escape velocities in our more massive (10$^{6}$M$_{\odot}$) clouds prevent the HII regions from sweeping up and expelling significant quantities of gas, so that the most massive clouds are largely dynamically unaffected by ionizing feedback. However, feedback has a profound effect on the lower--density 10$^{4}$ and 10$^{5}$M$_{\odot}$ clouds in our study, creating vast evacuated bubbles and expelling tens of percent of the neutral gas in the 3Myr timescale before the first supernovae are expected to detonate, resulting in clouds highly porous to both photons and supernova ejecta.
  • We present SPH simulations of protoclusters including the effects of winds from massive stars. Using a particle-injection method, we investigate the effect of structure close to the wind sources and the short-timescale influence of winds on protoclusters. Structures such as disks and gaseous filaments have a strong collimating effect. By a different technique of injecting momentum from point sources, we compare the large-scale, long-term effects of isotropic and intrinsically-collimated winds and find them to be similar. Both types of wind dramatically slow the global star formation process, but the timescale on which they expel significant mass from the cluster is rather long (approaching 10 freefall times). Clusters may then experience rapid star formation early in their lifetimes, before switching to a mode where gas is gradually expelled, while star formation proceeds much more slowly. This complicates conclusions regarding slow star formation derived from measuring the star-formation efficiency per freefall time. Estimates of the efficacy of winds in dispersing clusters derived simply from the total wind momentum flux may not be very reliable. This is due to material being expelled from deep within stellar potential wells, often to velocities well in excess of the cluster escape velocity, and also to the loss of momentum flux through holes in the gas distribution. Winds have little effect on the accretion--driven stellar IMF except at the very high-mass end, where they serve to prevent some of the most massive objects accreting. We also find that the morphology of the gas, the rapid motions of the wind sources and the action of accretion flows prevent the formation of bubble-like structures. This may make it difficult to discern the influence of winds on very young clusters.
  • In this paper, we examine numerically the difference between triggered and revealed star formation. We present Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of the impact on a turbulent 10^4 solar-mass molecular cloud of irradiation by an external source of ionising photons. In particular, using a control model, we investigate the triggering of star formation within the cloud. We find that, although feedback has a dramatic effect on the morphology of our model cloud, its impact on star formation is relatively minor. We show that external irradiation has both positive and negative effects, accelerating the formation of some objects, delaying the formation of others, and inducing the formation of some that would not otherwise have formed. Overall, the calculation in which feedback is included forms nearly twice as many objects over a period of \sim0.5 freefall times (\sim2.4 Myr), resulting in a star--formation efficiency approximately one third higher (\sim4% as opposed to \sim3% at this epoch) as in the control run in which feedback is absent. Unfortunately, there appear to be no observable characteristics which could be used to differentiate objects whose formation was triggered from those which were forming anyway and which were simply revealed by the effects of radiation, although this could be an effect of poor statistics.
  • We conduct Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of the `collect and collapse' scenario (Elmegreen and Lada, 1977) for star formation triggered by an expanding HII region. We simulate the evolution of a spherical uniform molecular cloud with an ionising source at its centre. The gas in the cloud is self-gravitating, although the cloud is prevented from globally collapsing. We find that the shell driven by the HII region fragments to form numerous self--gravitating objects. We repeat our calculations at four numerical resolutions to ensure that they are converged. We compare our results to the analytical model of Whitworth et al, 1994 and show that our simulations and the predictions of Whitworth et al are in good agreement in the sense that the shell fragments at the time and radius predicted by Whitworth et al to within 20% and 25% respectively. Most of the fragments produced in our two highest resolution calculations are approximately half the mass of those predicted, but this conclusion is robust against both numerical resolution and the presence of random noise (local fluctuations in density of a factor of $\sim2$) in the initial gas distribution. We conclude that such noise has little impact on the fragmentation process.
  • We present the first ever hydrodynamic calculations of star cluster formation that incorporate the effect of feedback from ionising radiation. In our simulations, the ionising source forms in the cluster core at the intersection of several dense filaments of inflowing gas. We show that these filaments collimate ionised outflows and suggest such an environmental origin for at least some observed outflows in regions of massive star formation. Our simulations show both positive feedback (i.e. promotion of star formation in neutral gas compressed by expanding HII regions) and negative feedback (i.e. suppression of the accretion flow in to the central regions). We show that the volume filling factor of ionised gas is very different in our simulations than would result from the case where the central source interacted with an azimuthally smoothed gas density distribution. As expected, gas density is the key parameter in determining whether clusters are unbound by photoionising radiation. Nevertheless, we find - on account of the acceleration of a small fraction of the gas to high velocities in the outflows - that the deposition in the gas of an energy that exceeds the binding energy of the cluster is not a sufficient criterion for unbinding the bulk of the cluster mass.