• Starting in December 2014, Kepler K2 observed Neptune continuously for 49 days at a 1-minute cadence. The goals consisted of studying its atmospheric dynamics (Simon et al. 2016), detecting its global acoustic oscillations (Rowe et al., submitted), and those of the Sun, which we report on here. We present the first indirect detection of solar oscillations in intensity measurements. Beyond the remarkable technical performance, it indicates how Kepler would see a star like the Sun. The result from the global asteroseismic approach, which consists of measuring the oscillation frequency at maximum amplitude "nu_max" and the mean frequency separation between mode overtones "Delta nu", is surprising as the nu_max measured from Neptune photometry is larger than the accepted value. Compared to the usual reference nu_max_sun = 3100 muHz, the asteroseismic scaling relations therefore make the solar mass and radius appear larger by 13.8 +/- 5.8 % and 4.3 +/- 1.9 % respectively. The higher nu_max is caused by a combination of the value of nu_max_sun, being larger at the time of observations than the usual reference from SOHO/VIRGO/SPM data (3160 +/- 10 muHz), and the noise level of the K2 time series, being ten times larger than VIRGO's. The peak-bagging method provides more consistent results: despite a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we model ten overtones for degrees l=0,1,2. We compare the K2 data with simultaneous SOHO/VIRGO/SPM photometry and BiSON velocity measurements. The individual frequencies, widths, and amplitudes mostly match those from VIRGO and BiSON within 1 sigma, except for the few peaks with lowest SNR.
  • Simulations predict that hot super-Earth sized exoplanets can have their envelopes stripped by photo-evaporation, which would present itself as a lack of these exoplanets. However, this absence in the exoplanet population has escaped a firm detection. Here we demonstrate, using asteroseismology on a sample of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates observed during the Kepler mission that, while there is an abundance of super-Earth sized exoplanets with low incident fluxes, none are found with high incident fluxes. We do not find any exoplanets with radii between 2.2 and 3.8 Earth radii with incident flux above 650 times the incident flux on Earth. This gap in the population of exoplanets is explained by evaporation of volatile elements and thus supports the predictions. The confirmation of a hot-super-Earth desert caused by evaporation will add an important constraint on simulations of planetary systems, since they must be able to reproduce the dearth of close-in super-Earths.
  • Binary stars provide a valuable test of stellar structure and evolution, because the masses of the individual stellar components can be derived with high accuracy and in a model-independent way. In this work, we study Spica, an eccentric double-lined spectroscopic binary system with a beta Cep type variable primary component. We use state-of-the-art modelling tools to determine accurate orbital elements of the binary system and atmospheric parameters of both stellar components. We interpret the short-period variability intrinsic to the primary component, detected on top of the orbital motion both in the photometric and spectroscopic data. The non-LTE based spectrum analysis reveals two stars of similar atmospheric chemical composition consistent with the present day cosmic abundance standard defined by Nieva&Przybilla (2012). The masses and radii of the stars are found to be 11.43+/-1.15 M_sun and 7.21+/-0.75 M_sun, and 7.47+/-0.54 R_sun and 3.74+/-0.53 R_sun for the primary and secondary, respectively. We find the primary component to pulsate in three independent modes, of which one is identified as a radial mode, while the two others are found to be non-radial, low degree l modes. The frequency of one of these modes is an exact multiple of the orbital frequency, and the l=m=2 mode identification suggests a tidal nature for this particular mode. We find a very good agreement between the derived dynamical and evolutionary masses for the Spica system to within the observational errors of the measured masses. The age of the system is estimated to be 12.5+/-1 Myr.
  • The first discoveries of exoplanets around Sun-like stars have fueled efforts to find ever smaller worlds evocative of Earth and other terrestrial planets in the Solar System. While gas-giant planets appear to form preferentially around metal-rich stars, small planets (with radii less than four Earth radii) can form under a wide range of metallicities. This implies that small, including Earth-size, planets may have readily formed at earlier epochs in the Universe's history when metals were far less abundant. We report Kepler spacecraft observations of KOI-3158, a metal-poor Sun-like star from the old population of the Galactic thick disk, which hosts five planets with sizes between Mercury and Venus. We used asteroseismology to directly measure a precise age of 11.2+/-1.0 Gyr for the host star, indicating that KOI-3158 formed when the Universe was less than 20% of its current age and making it the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets. We thus show that Earth-size planets have formed throughout most of the Universe's 13.8-billion-year history, providing scope for the existence of ancient life in the Galaxy.
  • The chemical composition of stars hosting small exoplanets (with radii less than four Earth radii) appears to be more diverse than that of gas-giant hosts, which tend to be metal-rich. This implies that small, including Earth-size, planets may have readily formed at earlier epochs in the Universe's history when metals were more scarce. We report Kepler spacecraft observations of Kepler-444, a metal-poor Sun-like star from the old population of the Galactic thick disk and the host to a compact system of five transiting planets with sizes between those of Mercury and Venus. We validate this system as a true five-planet system orbiting the target star and provide a detailed characterization of its planetary and orbital parameters based on an analysis of the transit photometry. Kepler-444 is the densest star with detected solar-like oscillations. We use asteroseismology to directly measure a precise age of 11.2+/-1.0 Gyr for the host star, indicating that Kepler-444 formed when the Universe was less than 20% of its current age and making it the oldest known system of terrestrial-size planets. We thus show that Earth-size planets have formed throughout most of the Universe's 13.8-billion-year history, leaving open the possibility for the existence of ancient life in the Galaxy. The age of Kepler-444 not only suggests that thick-disk stars were among the hosts to the first Galactic planets, but may also help to pinpoint the beginning of the era of planet formation.
  • The quantity and quality of satellite photometric data strings is revealing details in Cepheid variation at very low levels. Specifically, we observed a Cepheid pulsating in the fundamental mode and one pulsating in the first overtone with the Canadian MOST satellite. The 3.7-d period fundamental mode pulsator (RT Aur) has a light curve that repeats precisely, and can be modeled by a Fourier series very accurately. The overtone pulsator (SZ Tau, 3.1 d period) on the other hand shows light curve variation from cycle to cycle which we characterize by the variations in the Fourier parameters. We present arguments that we are seeing instability in the pulsation cycle of the overtone pulsator, and that this is also a characteristic of the O-C curves of overtone pulsators. On the other hand, deviations from cycle to cycle as a function of pulsation phase follow a similar pattern in both stars, increasing after minimum radius. In summary, pulsation in the overtone pulsator is less stable than that of the fundamental mode pulsator at both long and short timescales.
  • Context: The central star of the HR 8799 system is a gamma Doradus-type pulsator. The system harbours four planetary-mass companions detected by direct imaging, and is a good solar system analogue. The masses of the companions are not known accurately, because the estimation depends strongly on the age of the system, which is also not known with sufficient accuracy. Asteroseismic studies of the star might help to better constrain the age of HR 8799. We organized an extensive photometric and multi-site spectroscopic observing campaign for studying the pulsations of the central star. Aims: The aim of the present study is to investigate the pulsation properties of HR 8799 in detail via the ultra-precise 47-d-long nearly continuous photometry obtained with the MOST space telescope, and to find as many independent pulsation modes as possible, which is the prerequisite of an asteroseismic age determination. Methods: We carried out Fourier analysis of the wide-band photometric time series. Results: We find that resonance and sudden amplitude changes characterize the pulsation of HR 8799. The dominant frequency is always at f1 = 1.978 c/d. Many multiples of one ninth of the dominant frequency appear in the Fourier spectrum of the MOST data: n/9 f1, where n={1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 17, 18}. Our analysis also reveals that many of these peaks show strong amplitude decrease and phase variations even on the 47-d time-scale. The dependencies between the pulsation frequencies of HR 8799 make the planned subsequent asteroseismic analysis rather difficult. We point out some resemblance between the light curve of HR 8799 and the modulated pulsation light curves of Blazhko RR Lyrae stars.
  • We present results from three weeks' photometric monitoring of the magnetic helium-strong star sigma Ori E using the MOST microsatellite. The star's light curve is dominated by twice-per-rotation eclipse-like dimmings arising when magnetospheric clouds transit across and occult the stellar disk. However, no evidence is found for any abrupt centrifugal breakout of plasma from the magnetosphere, either in the residual flux or in the depths of the light minima. Motivated by this finding we compare the observationally inferred magnetospheric mass against that predicted by a breakout analysis. The large discrepancy between the values leads us to argue that centrifugal breakout does not play a significant role in establishing the magnetospheric mass budget of sigma Ori E.
  • We concentrate on an asteroseismological study of HD 261711, a rather hot delta Scuti type pulsating member of the young open cluster NGC 2264 located at the blue border of the instability region. HD 261711 was discovered to be a pre-main sequence delta Scuti star using the time series photometry obtained by the MOST satellite in 2006. High-precision, time-series photometry of HD 261711 was obtained by the MOST and CoRoT satellites in 4 separate new observing runs that are put into context with the star's fundamental atmospheric parameters obtained from spectroscopy. With the new MOST data set from 2011/12 and the two CoRoT light curves from 2008 and 2011/12, the delta Scuti variability was confirmed and regular groups of frequencies were discovered. The two pulsation frequencies identified in the data from the first MOST observing run in 2006 are confirmed and 23 new delta Scuti-type frequencies were discovered using the CoRoT data. Weighted average frequencies for each group are related to l=0 and l=1 p-modes. Evidence for amplitude modulation of the frequencies in two groups is seen. The effective temperature was derived to be 8600$\pm$200 K, log g is 4.1$\pm$0.2, and the projected rotational velocity is 53$\pm$1km/s. Using our Teff value and the radius of 1.8$\pm$0.5 Rsun derived from SED fitting, we get a log L/Lsun of 1.20$\pm$0.14 which agrees well to the seismologically determined values of 1.65 Rsun and, hence, a log L/Lsun of 1.13. The radial velocity of 14$\pm$2 km/s we derived for HD 261711, confirms the star's membership to NGC 2264. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 261711 is a delta Scuti-type star close to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) with a mass of 1.8 to 1.9Msun. HD 261711 is either a young ZAMS star or a late PMS star just before the onset of hydrogen-core burning.
  • MOST observations and model analysis of the Herbig Ae star HD 34282 (V1366 Ori) reveal {\delta}-Scuti pulsations. 22 frequencies are observed, 10 of which confirm those previously identified by Amado et al. (2006), and 12 of which are newly discovered in this work. We show that the weighted-average frequency in each group fits the radial p-mode frequencies of viable models. We argue that the observed pulsation spectrum extends just to the edge to the acoustic cut-off frequency and show that this also is consistent with our best-fitting models.
  • The Praesepe cluster contains a number of Delta Sct and Gamma Dor pulsators. Asteroseismology of cluster stars is simplified by the common distance, age and stellar abundances. Since asteroseismology requires a large number of known frequencies, the small pulsation amplitudes of these stars require space satellite campaigns. The present study utilizes photometric MOST satellite measurements in order to determine the pulsation frequencies of two evolved (EP Cnc, BT Cnc) and two main-sequence (BS Cnc, HD 73872) Delta Sct stars in the Praesepe cluster. The frequency analysis of the 2008 and 2009 data detected up to 34 frequencies per star with most amplitudes in the submillimag range. In BS Cnc, two modes showed strong amplitude variability between 2008 and 2009. The frequencies ranged from 0.76 to 41.7 c/d. After considering the different evolutionary states and mean stellar densities of these four stars, the differences and large ranges in frequency remain.
  • We present high-precision time-series photometry of the classical delta Scuti star HD 144277 obtained with the MOST (Microvariability and Oscillations of STars) satellite in two consecutive years. The observed regular frequency patterns are investigated asteroseismologically. HD 144277 is a hot A-type star that is located on the blue border of the classical instability strip. While we mostly observe low radial order modes in classical delta Scuti stars, HD 144277 presents a different case. Its high observed frequencies, i.e., between 59.9c/d (693.9 microHz) and 71.1c/d (822.8microHz), suggest higher radial orders. We examine the progression of the regular frequency spacings from the low radial order to the asymptotic frequency region. Frequency analysis was performed using Period04 and SigSpec. The results from the MOST observing runs in 2009 and 2010 were compared to each other. The resulting frequencies were submitted to asteroseismic analysis. HD 144277 was discovered to be a delta Scuti star using the time-series photometry observed by the MOST satellite. Twelve independent pulsation frequencies lying in four distinct groups were identified. Two additional frequencies were found to be combination frequencies. The typical spacing of 3.6c/d corresponds to the spacing between subsequent radial and dipole modes, therefore the spacing between radial modes is twice this value, 7.2c/d. Based on the assumption of slow rotation, we find evidence that the two radial modes are the sixth and seventh overtones, and the frequency with the highest amplitude can be identified as a dipole mode. The models required to fit the observed instability range need slightly less metallicity and a moderate enhancement of the helium abundance compared to the standard chemical composition. Our asteroseismic models suggest that HD 144277 is a delta Scuti star close to the ZAMS with a mass of 1.66 solar masses.
  • Asteroseismology involves probing the interiors of stars and quantifying their global properties, such as radius and age, through observationsof normal modes of oscillation. The technical requirements for conducting asteroseismology include ultra-high precision measured in photometry in parts per million, as well as nearly continuous time series over weeks to years, and cadences rapid enough to sample oscillations with periods as shortas a few minutes. We report on results from the first 43 days of observations in which the unique capabilities of Kepler in providing a revolutionary advance in asteroseismology are already well in evidence. The Kepler asteroseismology program holds intrinsic importance in supporting the core planetary search program through greatly enhanced knowledge of host star properties, and extends well beyond this to rich applications in stellar astrophysics.
  • Extra-solar planet search programs require high-precision velocity measurements. They need to study how to disentangle radial-velocity variations due to Doppler motion from the noise induced by stellar activity. We monitored the active K2V star HD 189733 and its transiting planetary companion that has a 2.2-day orbital period. We used the high-resolution spectograph SOPHIE mounted on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence to obtain 55 spectra of HD 189733 over nearly two months. We refined the HD 189733b orbit parameters and put limits on the eccentricity and on a long-term velocity gradient. After subtracting the orbital motion of the planet, we compared the variability of spectroscopic activity indices to the evolution of the radial-velocity residuals and the shape of spectral lines. The radial velocity, the spectral-line profile and the activity indices measured in HeI (5875.62 \AA), Halpha (6562.81 \AA) and the CaII H&K lines (3968.47 \AA and 3933.66 \AA, respectively) show a periodicity around the stellar rotation period and the correlations between them are consistent with a spotted stellar surface in rotation. We used such correlations to correct for the radial-velocity jitter due to stellar activity. This results in achieving high precision on the orbit parameters, with a semi-amplitude K = 200.56 \pm 0.88 m.s-1 and a derived planet mass of M_{P}=1.13 \pm 0.03 M$_{Jup}$.
  • The M33 galaxy is a nearby, relatively metal-poor, late-type spiral. Its proximity and almost face-on inclination means that it projects over a large area on the sky, making it an ideal candidate for wide-field CCD mosaic imaging. Photometry was obtained for more than 10^6 stars covering a 74' x 56' field centered on M33. Main sequence (MS), supergiant branch (SGB), red giant branch (RGB) and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) populations are identified and classified based on broad-band V and I photometry. Narrow-band filters are used to measure spectral features allowing the AGB population to be further divided into C and M-star types. The galactic structure of M33 is examined using star counts, colour-colour and colour-magnitude selected stellar populations. We use the C to M-star ratio to investigate the metallicity gradient in the disk of M33. The C/M-star ratio is found to increase and then flatten with increasing galactocentric radius in agreement with viscous disk formation models. The C-star luminosity function is found to be similar to M31 and the SMC, suggesting that C-stars should be useful distance indicators. The ``spectacular arcs of carbon stars'' in M33 postulated recently by Block et al. (2004) are found in our work to be simply an extension of M33's disk.
  • Fourier coefficents have been derived for the $V$ and $R$ light curves of 785 overtone RR Lyrae variables in 16 MACHO fields near the bar of the LMC. The $\phi_{31}$ and $R_{21}$ coefficients have been compared with those of the first overtone RR Lyrae variables in the Galactic globular clusters NGC 6441, M107, M5, M3, M2, $\omega$ Centauri and M68. The results indicate that many of the LMC variables have properties similar to the ones in M2, M3, M5 and the Oosterhoff type I variables in $\omega$ Cen, but they are different from the Oosterhoff type II variables in $\omega$ Cen. Equations derived from hydrodynamic pulsation models have been used to calculate the luminosity and temperature for the 330 bona fide first-overtone variables. The results indicate that they have $\log L$ in the range 1.6 to $1.8\lsun$ and $\log T_{eff}$ between 3.85 and 3.87. Based on these temperatures, a mean color excess $E(V-R) =0.08$ mag, equivalent to $E(B-V)=0.14$ mag, has been estimated for these 330 stars. The 80 M5-like variables (selected according to their location in the $\phi_{31}-\log P$ plot) are used to determine a LMC distance. After correcting for the effects of extinction and crowding, a mean apparent magnitude $<V_0>=18.99 \pm 0.02$ (statistical) $\pm 0.16$ (systematic) has been estimated for these 80 stars. Combining this with a mean absolute magnitude $M_V=0.56\pm 0.06$ for M5-like stars derived from Baade-Wesselink analyses, main sequence fitting, Fourier parameters and the trigonometric parallax of RR Lyrae, we derive an LMC distance modulus $\mu=18.43\pm 0.06$ (statistical) $\pm 0.16$ (systematic) mag. The large systematic error arises from the difficulties of correcting for interstellar extinction and for crowding.