• The cool white dwarf SDSS J124231.07+522626.6 exhibits photospheric absorption lines of 8 distinct heavy elements in medium resolution optical spectra, notably including oxygen. The Teff = 13000 K atmosphere is helium-dominated, but the convection zone contains significant amounts of hydrogen and oxygen. The four most common rock-forming elements (O, Mg, Si, and Fe) account for almost all the accreted mass, totalling at least 1.2e+24 g, similar to the mass of Ceres. The time-averaged accretion rate is 2e+10 g/s, one of the highest rates inferred among all known metal-polluted white dwarfs. We note a large oxygen excess, with respect to the most common metal oxides, suggesting that the white dwarf accreted planetary debris with a water content of ~38 per cent by mass. This star, together with GD 61, GD 16, and GD 362, form a small group of outliers from the known population of evolved planetary systems accreting predominantly dry, rocky debris. This result strengthens the hypothesis that, integrated over the cooling ages of white dwarfs, accretion of water-rich debris from disrupted planetesimals may significantly contribute to the build-up of trace hydrogen observed in a large fraction of helium-dominated white dwarf atmospheres.
  • We have spectroscopically confirmed a brown dwarf mass companion to the hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf NLTT5306. The white dwarf's atmospheric parameters were measured using Sloan Digital Sky Survey and X-Shooter spectroscopy as T_eff=7756+/-35K and log(g)=7.68+/-0.08, giving a mass for the primary of M_WD=0.44+/-0.04 M_sun, at a distance of 71+/-4 pc with a cooling age of 710+/-50 Myr. The existence of the brown dwarf secondary was confirmed through the near-infrared arm of the X-Shooter data and a spectral type of dL4-dL7 was estimated using standard spectral indices. Combined radial velocity measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, X-Shooter and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph of the white dwarf gives a minimum mass of 56+/-3 M_jup for the secondary, confirming the substellar nature. The period of the binary was measured as 101.88+/-0.02 mins using both the radial velocity data and i'-band variability detected with the INT. This variability indicates 'day' side heating of the brown dwarf companion. We also observe H{\alpha} emission in our higher resolution data in phase with the white dwarf radial velocity, indicating this system is in a low level of accretion, most likely via a stellar wind. This system represents the shortest period white dwarf + brown dwarf binary and the secondary has survived a stage of common envelope evolution, much like its longer period counterpart, WD0137-349. Both systems likely represent bona-fide progenitors of cataclysmic variables with a low mass white dwarf and a brown dwarf donor.
  • A re-evaluation of time-averaged accretion rates at DBZ-type white dwarfs points to historical, time-averaged rates significantly higher than the currently observed episodes at their DAZ counterparts. The difference between the ongoing, instantaneous accretion rates witnessed at DAZ white dwarfs, which often exceed 1e8 g/s, and those inferred over the past 1e5-1e6 yr for the DBZ stars can be a few orders of magnitude, and therefore must result from high-rate episodes of tens to hundreds of years so they remain undetected to date. This paper explores the likelihood that such brief, intense accretion episodes of gas-phase material can account for existing data. For reasonable assumptions about the circumstellar gas, accretion rates approaching or exceeding 1e15 g/s are possible, similar to rates observed in quiescent cataclysmic variables, and potentially detectable with future x-ray missions or wide-field monitoring facilities. Gaseous debris that is prone to such rapid accretion may be abundant immediately following a tidal disruption event via collisions and sublimation, or if additional bodies impinge upon an extant disk. Particulate disk matter accretes at or near the Poynting-Robertson drag rate for long periods between gas-producing events, consistent with rates inferred for dusty DAZ white dwarfs. In this picture, warm DAZ stars without infrared excesses have rates consistent with accretion from particulate disks that remain undetected. This overall picture has implications for quasi-steady state models of accretion and the derived chemical composition of asteroidal debris in DBZ white dwarfs.
  • We present a method to select hot subdwarf stars with A to M-type companions using photometric selection criteria. We cover a wide range in wavelength by combining GALEX ultraviolet data, optical photometry from the SDSS and the Carlsberg Meridian telescope, near-infrared data from 2MASS and UKIDSS. We construct two complimentary samples, one by matching GALEX, CMC and 2MASS, as well as a smaller, but deeper, sample using GALEX, SDSS and UKIDSS. In both cases, a large number of composite subdwarf plus main-sequence star candidates were found. We fit their spectral energy distributions with a composite model in order to estimate the subdwarf and companion star effective temperatures along with the distance to each system. The distribution of subdwarf effective temperature was found to primarily lie in the 20,000 - 30,000 K regime, but we also find cooler subdwarf candidates, making up ~5-10 per cent. The most prevalent companion spectral types were seen to be main-sequence stars between F0 and K0, while subdwarfs with M-type companions appear much rarer. This is clear observational confirmation that a very efficient first stable Roche-lobe overflow channel appears to produce a large number of subdwarfs with F to K-type companions. Our samples thus support the importance of binary evolution for subdwarf formation.
  • We present HST ultraviolet spectroscopy of the white dwarfs PG0843+516, PG1015+161, SDSS1228+1040, and GALEX1931+0117, which accrete circumstellar planetary debris formed from the destruction of asteroids. Combined with optical data, a minimum of five and a maximum of eleven different metals are detected in their photospheres. With metal sinking time scales of only a few days, these stars are in accretion/diffusion equilibrium, and the photospheric abundances closely reflect those of the circumstellar material. We find C/Si ratios that are consistent with that of the bulk Earth, corroborating the rocky nature of the debris. Their C/O values are also very similar to those of bulk Earth, implying that the planetary debris is dominated by Mg and Fe silicates. The abundances found for the debris at the four white dwarfs show substantial diversity, comparable at least to that seen across different meteorite classes in the solar system. PG0843+516 exhibits significant over-abundances of Fe and Ni, as well as of S and Cr, which suggests the accretion of material that has undergone melting, and possibly differentiation. PG1015+161 stands out by having the lowest Si abundance relative to all other detected elements. The Al/Ca ratio of the planetary debris around different white dwarfs is remarkably similar. This is analogous to the nearly constant abundance ratio of these two refractory lithophile elements found among most bodies in the solar system. Based on the detection of all major elements of the circumstellar debris, we calculate accretion rates of ~1.7e8g/s ~1.5e9g/s. We detect additional circumstellar absorption in the SiIV 1394,1403 doublet in PG0843+516 and SDSS1228+1040, reminiscent to similar high-ionisation lines seen in white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. We suspect that these lines originate in hot gas close to the white dwarf, well within the sublimation radius.
  • Spitzer IRAC observations of 15 metal-polluted white dwarfs reveal infrared excesses in the spectral energy distributions of HE 0110-5630, GD 61, and HE 1349-2305. All three of these stars have helium-dominated atmospheres, and their infrared emissions are consistent with warm dust produced by the tidal destruction of (minor) planetary bodies. This study brings the number of metal-polluted, helium and hydrogen atmosphere white dwarfs surveyed with IRAC to 53 and 38 respectively. It also nearly doubles the number of metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs found to have closely orbiting dust by Spitzer. From the increased statistics for both atmospheric types with circumstellar dust, we derive a typical disk lifetime of log[t_{disk} (yr)] = 5.6+-1.1 (ranging from 3*10^4 - 5*10^6 yr). This assumes a relatively constant rate of accretion over the timescale where dust persists, which is uncertain. We find that the fraction of highly metal-polluted helium-rich white dwarfs that have an infrared excess detected by Spitzer is only 23 per cent, compared to 48 per cent for metal-polluted hydrogen-rich white dwarfs, and we conclude from this difference that the typical lifetime of dusty disks is somewhat shorter than the diffusion time scales of helium-rich white dwarf. We also find evidence for higher time-averaged accretion rates onto helium-rich stars compared to the instantaneous accretion rates onto hydrogen-rich stars; this is an indication that our picture of evolved star-planetary system interactions is incomplete. We discuss some speculative scenarios that can explain the observations.
  • This paper reports follow-up photometric and spectroscopic observations, including warm Spitzer IRAC photometry of seven white dwarfs from the SDSS with apparent excess flux in UKIDSS K-band observations. Six of the science targets were selected from 16,785 DA star candidates identified either spectroscopically or photometrically within SDSS DR7, spatially cross-correlated with HK detections in UKIDSS DR8. Thus the selection criteria are completely independent of stellar mass, effective temperature above 8000 K, and the presence (or absence) of atmospheric metals. The infrared fluxes of one target are compatible with a spatially-unresolved late M or early L-type companion, while three stars exhibit excess emissions consistent with warm circumstellar dust. These latter targets have spectral energy distributions similar to known dusty white dwarfs with high fractional infrared luminosities (thus the K-band excesses). Optical spectroscopy reveals the stars with disk-like excesses are polluted with heavy elements, denoting the ongoing accretion of circumstellar material. One of the disks exhibits a gaseous component - the fourth reported to date - and orbits a relatively cool star, indicating the gas is produced via collisions as opposed to sublimation, supporting the picture of a recent event. The resulting statistics yield a lower limit of 0.8% for the fraction dust disks at DA-type white dwarfs with cooling ages less than 1 Gyr. Two overall results are noteworthy: all stars whose excess infrared emission is consistent with dust are metal-rich; and no stars warmer than 25,000 K are found to have this type of excess, despite sufficient sensitivity.
  • We present a method which uses colour-colour cuts on SDSS photometry to select white dwarfs with hydrogen rich (DA) atmospheres without the recourse to spectroscopy. This method results in a sample of DA white dwarfs that is 95% complete at an efficiency of returning a true DA white dwarf of 62%. The approach was applied to SDSS Data Release 7 for objects with and without SDSS spectroscopy. This lead to 4636 spectroscopically confirmed DA white dwarfs with g<=19; a ~70% increase compared to Eisenstein et al.'s 2006 sample. Including the photometric-only objects, we estimate a factor of 3 increase in DA white dwarfs. We find that the SDSS spectroscopic follow-up is 44% complete for DA white dwarfs with effective temperature >~ 8000K. We further cross-correlated the SDSS sample with Data Release 8 of the UKIDSS Large Area Survey. The spectral energy distributions of both subsets, with and without SDSS spectroscopy, were fitted with white dwarf models to determine the fraction of DA white dwarfs with low-mass stellar companions or dusty debris discs via the detection of excess near-infrared emission. From the spectroscopic sample we find that 2.0% of white dwarfs have an excess consistent with a brown dwarf type companion, with a firm lower limit of 0.8%. From the white dwarfs with photometry only, we find that 1.8% are candidates for having brown dwarf companions. Similarly, both samples show that ~1% of white dwarfs are candidates for having a dusty debris disc.
  • We report the identification of 26 cool DZ white dwarfs that lie across and below the main sequence in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-g vs. g-r two-color diagram; 21 of these stars are new discoveries. The sample was identified by visual inspection of all spectra of objects that fall below the main sequence in the two-color diagram, as well as by an automated search for characteristic spectral features over a large area in color space that included the main sequence. The spectra and photometry provided by the SDSS project are interpreted with model atmospheres, including all relevant metals. Effective temperatures and element abundances are determined, while the surface gravity has to be assumed and was fixed at the canonical value of log g = 8. These stars represent the extension of the well-known DZ sequence towards cooler temperatures and fill the gap around Teff = 6500 K present in a previous study. The metal abundances are similar to those in the hotter DZ, but the lowest abundances are missing, probably because of our selection procedures. The interpretation is complicated in terms of the accretion/diffusion scenario, because we do not know if accretion is still occurring or has ended long ago. Independent of that uncertainty, the masses of the metals currently present in the convection zones - and thus an absolute lower limit of the total accreted masses - of these stars are similar to the largest asteroids in our solar system.
  • Spitzer observations reveal the presence of warm debris from a tidally destroyed rocky and possibly icy planetary body orbiting the white dwarf GD 61. Ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy of the metal-contaminated stellar photosphere reveal traces of hydrogen, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, iron, and calcium. The nominal ratios of these elements indicate an excess of oxygen relative to that expected from rock-forming metal oxides, and thus it is possible that water was accreted together with the terrestrial-like debris. Iron is found to be deficient relative to magnesium and silicon, suggesting the material may have originated as the outer layers of a differentiated parent body, as is widely accepted for the Moon.
  • We identify SDSS J130033.48+590407.0 as a common proper motion companion to the well-studied DA white dwarf PG 1258+593 (GD322). The system lies at a distance of 68 +/- 3 pc, where the angular separation of 16.1 +/- 0.1 arcsec corresponds to a minimum binary separation of 1091 +/- 7 AU. SDSS J1300+5904 is a cool (Teff = 6300 +/- 300K) magnetic white dwarf (B ~ 6 MG). PG 1258+593 is a hydrogen-rich (DA) white dwarf with Teff=14790 +/- 77 K and log(g) = 7.87 +/- 0.02. Using the white dwarf mass-radius relation implies the masses of SDSS J1300+5904 and PG 1258+593 are 0.54 +/- 0.06 Msun and 0.54 +/- 0.01 Msun, respectively, and therefore a cooling age difference of 1.67 +/- 0.05 Gyr. Adopting main-sequence life times from stellar models, we derive an upper limit of 2.2 Msun for the mass of the progenitor of PG 1258+593. A plausible range of initial masses is 1.4 - 1.8 Msun for PG 1258+593 and 2 - 3 Msun for SDSS J1300+5904. Our analysis shows that white dwarf common proper motion binaries can potentially constrain the white dwarf initial-final mass relation and the formation mechanism for magnetic white dwarfs. The magnetic field of SDSS J1300+5904 is consistent with an Ap progenitor star. A common envelope origin of the system cannot be excluded, but requires a triple system as progenitor.
  • Stars with masses in the range 7-10Msun end their lives either as massive white dwarfs or weak type II supernovae, and there are only limited observational constraints of either channel. Here we report the detection of two white dwarfs with large photospheric oxygen abundances, implying that they are bare oxygen-neon cores and that they may have descended from the most massive progenitors that avoid core-collapse.